BJ Daniels working out for Seattle today

April 12th, 2013 | Written by Rob Staton

This won’t be much of a surprise to anyone who read Kip’s piece a month ago.

Meanwhile, USA Today is reporting that Tyrann Mathieu has admitted to an unnamed team he failed more than ten drugs tests at LSU. Or in his words, “I stopped counting at ten.”

Here are the three people we seem to have talked about the most this off-season:

1. Tyrann Mathieu

2. Da’Rick Rogers

3. Matt Flynn

Two overrated players with major character concerns and a backup quarterback. That can’t be right. I’m not sure what it is about guys like Mathieu or Rogers that make them so appealing to fans, but I’ve been prepared for another team to roll that particular dice for a long time.

Yes, credit Mathieu for being open and honest about his problem. But it’s still a very serious issue and it will be a distraction. I’m not sure what will come first in Mathieu’s life over the next couple of years — fighting an addiction to drugs, taking drugs or playing football. If he’s going to become an All-Pro (something I highly doubt based on his on-field ability) then I’m ready to congratulate the other team who gets him there.

It’s the same with Rogers. Here’s a guy who’s courted controversy everywhere he’s gone. During recruitment, during his time with Tennessee. Then we see reports suggesting the coaches at Tennessee Tech weren’t ready to giving him a positive reference. He too has failed drugs tests, but was a royal pain in the backside to his coaches. And before anyone brings up Percy Harvin — note the lack of Harvin being kicked off his team. It’s not like Florida wasn’t prepared to be tough with Janoris Jenkins. Unlike Rogers.

The team has enough playmakers, receivers and corners to not need to go down this line. It’s not about wanting choir boys. It’s about judging every case on its merits. I’ll pass.

76 Responses to “BJ Daniels working out for Seattle today”

  1. Hawksince77 says:

    As far as Mathieu goes, PC/JS have favored players in the secondary with length (Thomas the shortest among them at something like 5’11″). Now they are looking to sign Winfield, breaking two molds (height and age). If Seattle is willing to take a chance on an undersized player in the secondary, why not draft Shamarko Thomas? Instead of signing the current Winfield, use the roster spot to develop the next one.

    As far as Rogers goes, there are so many other options at the position I can’t see it for Seattle. Both he and Mathieu are busts waiting to happen. For a 7th rounder, maybe. Even then, I could probably name 4 or 5 players you’d rather take a chance on that will be available then (thanks to this site).

    And let the ‘MF’ word never again be spoken here (other than to point out the latest news that Oakland worked out Vince Young and liked him. Now wouldn’t that just be a shame…)

    • Belgaron says:

      I think you need to be a 1st round or high 2nd round draft choice to really be eligible to be called a “bust”. If these guys go as they are projected in the third or higher, they could definitely still fail but there gets to be a point where there was an accepted risk that they would fail. Bust is a perfect label for Aaron Curry and it weakens the label to call a 3rd round pick a bust although expectations should be higher on them than say an undrafted guy like Burfict.

      • Hawksince77 says:

        Fair enough. Every college player is a risk transitioning from college to the pros. Witness the recent concerns about Lacey and his work ethic. My sense is that both Mathieu and Rogers have exhibited attitude and behavior that greatly increases the risk of them being unable to make a successful transition, regardless of what round they are selected. So what I meant to say was something more like, “They are both more likely to bust out of the league than other players with similar skill-sets.”

        • Michael (CLT) says:

          Win now. Sign Antoine, draft guys that can grow without distraction. Plenty of guys have Rogers and Mathieu talent. Draft them and grow them. Reward them.

    • mjkleko says:

      I wouldn’t say the Winfield signing is at all breaking the mold. Rather, it’s following a consistent pattern that Schneider has adhered to in his short time in Seattle. Specifically, it’s having a highly experienced veteran defensive back to help mentor the young secondary. Sherman and Thomas have been vocal about the knowledge they were able to glean from Trufant, which along with his familiarity with the system and organization, was likely a huge reason he was brought back for the 2012 season.

      In addition, when it comes to a slot defender, PC/JS have shown a willingness to utilize defensive backs of average height. Before Trufant was moved into that role, Thurmond was queued up. In addition, many were clamoring for Lane to see time manned up in the slot after Trufant’s unspectacular play, yet the team was reluctant to do this. At first I assumed it was because they did not want to heap additional responsibilities on a young players plate and continue to have Lane focus on playing on the outside (which paid off well when he filled in for Browner), but I have come to think that his height may have had an impact as well.

      With those factors in mind, Winfield signing is not breaking any molds if you ask me. It’s no secret how well respected he is across the league, heck Sherm was probably watching this guy play when he was in Pop Warner. So far, the members of the secondary have been effusive in their praise of Winfield and appear genuinely excited to have him on board. While you will never hear me say a bad word about all-time Seahawk great Marcus Trufant, I believe Antoine represents a significant upgrade, particularly on 3rd downs with his aggressive play-making technique and vast knowledge of the game. Marcus was ill-suited to play inside and I believe he would have been much more effective as a backup on the outside rather then as a slot defender.

      I do agree with you however that now would be an excellent time to draft a new potential successor to man the slot with Winfield in the fold. Having a late round pick to come in to compete with Thurmond would seemingly be par for the course for Pete and John. Is that player Shamarko Thomas? I have simply quit trying to predict who this front office will take in the draft, but he certainly is a player who appears to be very similar to Winfield and perhaps would make a good understudy.

      • Hawksince77 says:

        Learning more about Winfield, specifically over at The Daily Norseman where Viking fans are leaping off tall buildings in droves, it has become clear the kind of professional he is, and what he brings to Seattle.

        Lane and Thurmond are not ideally suited for the slot. Both guys project better on the outside, which is fine. People around the league are talking about Winfield as the finest slot corner in the league. Seattle couldn’t ask for much more.

        So the bottom line: PC/JS will make exceptions (height/age) for exceptional talent. And as you point out, Winfield’s contribution to the younger players cannot be overstated. It’s a one year deal, and that’s fine. Hopefully we see his successor develop out of this draft.

  2. JW says:

    yep. the headache/talent ratio is out of whack far enough to not really want these guys on the team. If they had either better talent or better character I’d give them more thought. But they don’t.

    • Belgaron says:

      Pete Carroll has some charities that he works with helping troubled youth. I think this is why he might be more likely to be willing to take on character projects.

      • Phil says:

        While signing some guy like Mathieu might “help” him as an individual, what kind of message does it send to others who have to make the choice between weed and the game? IMHO, the message would be that you can repeatedly break team rules and (possibly) the law, get kicked off your college team, and still be rewarded with an NFL contract. Maybe it’s time to show our troubled youth that the choices you make in life have consequences ….

  3. Aaron says:

    It was already pretty clear that Mathieu was smoking marijuana during his time at LSU. I don’t think the number of times they elected to drug test him is particularly relevant. Marijuana stays in your system for about 30 days after you smoke it one time. If he was smoking on anything close to a regular basis, he was certain to test positive every time. This report actually says more about LSU and their willingness to forgive this behavior than it says about Mathieu.

    I’m not saying it’s not news and that it’s not woth posting, but I think it’s just going to reinforce each person’s pre-existing opinion on the issue. If you like his upside and tend to discount the baggage of his past(?) marijuana use (as I do) then you’ll feel the same after this report. If you think the drug issue is of such concern that you are inclined to take him off your board entirely (as you do Rob) then you’ll feel supported by this report.

    In defense of my position, I just have a hard time thinking of a long list of highly talented players whose NFL careers were cut short by drug use, particularly marijuana. Obviously Ricky Williams springs to mind, but he seems to be more of an exception than an example of a rule. He managed to have a decent career regardless. I’d probably spend a 3rd or 4th rounder on him if I knew ahead of time how his career would pan out.

    I think it’s best to judge the player on his skils and ability just like any other prospect. At the same time do your due diligence and maintain a healthy skepticism during the interview process. If you think he’s potentially going to be a difference-maker in the league, then you take him in the 3rd or 4th round. Low risk, high reward.

    Obviously if the Seahwaks sign Winfield, that alters their calculation to some extent, or maybe I’m wrong about how PC/JS view him as a prospect, and their interest in Winfield is a manifestation of their pre-existing calculation. We’ll see. That’s the fun part about all this.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Not many players careers have been cut short by drug use, but not many players fail more than ten drugs tests in college, get kicked off their team and still make it to the league. I honestly believe if it wasn’t for the hype surrounding ‘the Honey Badger’ last year, he’d be completely off the radar.

      Talent wise he made some impact plays last year. But his overall skill set was worth a middle round pick IMO. The drug issues push that back even further. I would only take him with the level of investment that would allow me to cut him at a moments notice without any regrets. Even if that’s on day one of training camp.

      • Aaron says:

        I understand the other side of this debate, and it may prove correct in this case. I’ll just say again, I think the talent level on the field is much, much more important than past (or even present) marijuana use. That talent level is obviously up for debate as well. Deion Sanders is an evangelist for this guy, and I’ll roll with Deion on this one. It’s true Deion is a positive guy and supports the players he works out, but he’s been unusually adamant about this player and has gone on record saying he would take him in the first round. Between that and his stats and tape playing in the SEC, I’d spend a mid-round pic if I were in Seattle’s position of being able to take a luxury pic at a position of need.

        • Rob Staton says:

          In fairness, I’m not sure I’ve ever heard Deion speak negatively about anyone. And what are his evaluation credentials really?

          I think if you’re willing to take him in the middle rounds (3-4) then you’re essentially preparing yourself for the possibility of cutting a third or fourth rounder at any point in that contract. Whether it’s week one or whatever. The issue with Mathieu off the field cannot be ignored and if he has a relapse, it’s game over for me. He comes into the league on two strikes because of the serious nature of his problems at LSU. Personally, I doubt anyone in the league will go near him in that range. I’m willing to be proven very wrong. I think he’s received far too much attention and part of me’s already regretting bringing his name up again. We’ll see. But if he is drafted, I think it’ll be in a range where teams know that if that third strike comes, they can move on without regrets.

          • Aaron says:

            Lol @ “part of me’s already regretting bringing his name up again.”

            Looks like we got Winfield anyway. I’m happy about that.

          • A. Simmons says:

            If this guy were an alcoholic, I doubt we would even be having this discussion. He’s only a weed smoker, so I guess that’s ok. Koren Robinson’s career was derailed by alcohol problems. I would say Leroy’s marijuana use negatively impacted his career. We’ve seen it with more than Ricky Williams. This isn’t the NFL in the days of Michael Irvin where you could hide a coke habit and be good to go. The modern NFL will be watching Tyrann Mathieu like a hawk. He’ll have extra testing precautions that could cost him games if he can’t control himself even once.

            Late round pick is where you take such risks, not early.

            • Phil says:

              I know this is going to sound preachy, but the NFL has been really successful at marketing its game to the public and, in particular, to a wide fan base including lots of young fans who idolize the players they see on the field. So, IMHO, character does matter.

              I love the image that RW portrays. He’s enthusiastic and hard-working. He’s well-spoken and respectful of the fans. He’s a leader, not only on the field and in the clubhouse, but also in the community. If I had a son or daughter, I would be proud to point to him as an example of what success you can have if you work hard and play by the rules.

              In contrast, I’d have a hard time dealing with someone like Mathieu. Someone who has admitted openly that he has flaunted team rules repeatedly, been kicked off his college team and has lost his scholarship, and yet still gets rewarded with an NFL contract while there are other good players who get passed over. I guess it’s a good example of a society that is willing to make exceptions for those who are thought to have exceptional talents. But, that’s a lesson that I’d rather not have to share with my son or daughter.

    • Bobby Cink says:

      Marijuana stays in your system for that long provided you are using it on a daily basis.

      The length of time it stays in your system also depends on a variety of other factors, most notably body types. A very athletic person like TM who smokes one time isn’t going to keep it in his system as long as Joe Schmoe who weighs 200 lbs with 30% body fat.

      • Nolan says:

        Not actually correct if you work out your it will leave your fat cells and enter your blood stream that’s why if your trying to pass a drug test they tell you not to work out.

  4. Leonard says:

    I know it was very selfish of him but I just have a hard time getting to upset at a kid for smoking pot. Even A LOT of pot. He was very immature, even for a twenty year old. From what I understand, he had a hard life and weed was how he dealt with things. I’m not excusing his behavior because it hurt his team and knew it would. All that being said, most people grow up some time and weed isn’t like crack. It’s not a physical addiction, it’s a mental one. Not easy to deal with but not close to impossible either. If he can convince an NFL front office that he has grown up then someone is going to take a shot on him. He has instincts and play making abilities that you just can’t coach into someone. You can coach technique and scheme to help round out his game which is why I think Carroll would like him. Again, if he has grown up.
    Rodgers on the other hand just doesn’t seem to be a good guy. Two different coaching staffs have nothing good to say about the kid. By all accounts he was a pain in the butt during practice and didn’t take well to coaching. That sounds like an attitude problem and that’s not something that most people grow out of. Definately a non starter on a team like Seattle where everyone gets coached up and puts in more than minimum work. By comparison, I have never heard a coach say anything negative about Mathieu’s work ethic or attitude aside from the drug problem. Les Miles is kind of a hard ass but he recently said that Mathieu could be trusted enough to draft and start in his first year. The opinions of former coaches means a lot.
    I’m not saying that I think Mathieu will be an all pro. With some maturity he could be a pretty good nickle back or free safety though. Also a huge weapon on special teams and even on offense for a few plays. He was the best return man in college a few years ago who was a threat to score every time he touched the ball.
    IF…he has grown up.

    • peter says:

      Courtney Upshaw, Michael Oher, Robert Turbin….there are many more names of people with difficult struggles at young ages, who still had enough upstairs to make the choices that are important to them.

      I don’t care if anyone smokes pot….Not in the slightest….that said, if it’s not that important to you to stay clean to pursue the opportunities given to you by talent and chance, then it’s simply not that important.

      I’ve said it before and you hear it all the time in sports vernacular but your availability as a player is more important to the team and your own self then your abilities.

      Thusly we can talk abut taking chances all we want to, but why would we not be better served by taking more chances on division 2 players, working their tails off, because they played the wrong sport in high school (ie: track or baseball, or what not instead of football) and want badly to be recognized then a player with sub optimal strength, speed, coverage skills, that is not concerned in the slightest with staying clean which is a huge deal to the image that the NFL wants to project.

      Sure his plays are splashy, but if you want a return man Seattle could have gotten say Trindon Holiday for a roster bonus, not a draft pick, If you want a slot/nickel corner Kip and Rob have pointed out a good deal of options….

      • Rob Staton says:

        Upshaw, Oher and Turbin had difficult upbringings. But their issues were behind them. Mathieu’s issues are not in the past, unfortunately.

        • peter says:

          True…I was just expressing names of young men who had something, whatever that may be to not allow “troubled youth,” be their albatross, and perhaps maybe even use it to their advantage.

          I think a lot of this Tyrann love is weird actually. he gets more pub then guys even like Banks/Rhodes/Trufant from this years draft good players who will be going in the first round expected to be real impact players from day one…

          • A. Simmons says:

            Did you just mention Robert Turbin’s name in the same breath as the Mathieu? Did you really just do that? Robert Turbin, a kid that didn’t have any substance abuse issues, a kid that helped take care of sick sister with cerebral palsy? A kid that lost a brother and sister and stilled stay strong in himself and stuck by his family? You kidding me?

            Turbin is as high character as they come. You just compared him to Tyrann Mathieu? Please don’t make that comparison again. Robert Turbin’s will is made of steel. Tyrann could not have even handled what Robert Turbin did.

            Robert Turbin is a prime example of why Tyrann Mathieu’s story isn’t impressive at all. Turbin dealt with far greater adversity, he didn’t turn to drugs or any negative behaviors. He kept on helping his family and improving himself. They’re not even in the same ballpark, yet Turbin went in Round 4.

            • Jon says:

              That is actually his point. Turbin had a hard life and did not turn to pot. Mathieu had a hard life and did.

              Character has to be worth something. A guy that loves pot more than football is to expensive in a draft with so much talent, especially if you take him before the 5th or 6th. I would spend our 6th or 7th in a heartbeat because of the possible playmaking and upside. But before that, there would be to much risk IMO.

              • A. Simmons says:

                I thought the original post was comparing players like Turbin and Mathieu. I see it was Peter using counter-examples. Boy, I”m tired of Tyrann Mathieu talk. Why so many want to give this guy a shot I don’t know. Why would anyone want to invite those kind of problems into the locker room and with an early round pick? I don’t get it.

      • Leonard says:

        I really wasn’t trying to excuse his behavior. I was just trying to make the point that it is very possible that at some point he grows up and becomes a responsible adult. I’ve seen a lot of 20 year old children who make major changes in their early 20′s. It’s a case by case thing and if he doesn’t prove to GM’s he is on the right path then he will probably be a late round pick with a zero tolerance policy. If he has matured in the last year then he will contribute to some team. Probably only as a role player but that still has a lot of value.

      • Michael (CLT) says:

        Wow. I am digging your vibe, dude. Right on!

    • JW says:

      The issue isn’t the weed. It’s the decision to smoke it in the face of such sanction. Over and over and over.

  5. Miles says:

    I’m excited for the BJ Daniels work out. Who the Seahawks work out is quite indicative of who they are interested in. I really believe the team has all but settled on many players even before they bring them in for a workout. That may be the case with BJ. Is he a lock for a 7th round choice or a UDFA signing?

    • Belgaron says:

      I was trying to tell if you were joking because they tend to play their cards close the vest at the high end. They were afraid word would get out about their interest in Irvin and RW was surprised by Seattle’s selection because they hadn’t tipped their hand to him how highly they valued him.

      For UDFA’s on the other hand, they prefer to use their allotment of visits on these types as a recruitment effort so Daniels may very well fall into that category.

      • Miles says:

        The latter part of what you just said is what I meant.

        • Michael (CLT) says:

          I would think UDFA. There will be another BJ next year if he signs elsewhere. Or you can grab him from a practice squad. I think we need to temper our expectations of players like BJ Daniels. He is not Russell Wilson.

          • Jon says:

            We don’t need another Russel Wilson. I think spending 1 of 4 7th round picks in order to secure a QB that you like for a Back up QB competition is an evaluated risk in the end that may pay off, or you could draft another guy in the 7th and cut him instead.

            • Jon says:

              point is on this team I see the 7th round and securing UDFAs that you feel will be in demand, and therefore decide to secure them instead of having to compete against other teams for their services.

  6. Belgaron says:

    I know you are hitting this subject material more than most because of your fine work on this blog. And I’m sure hearing the same names over and over gets old but I wouldn’t equate name saturation with talent evaluation. At the end of the day, professional sports is about talent and how much GMs are willing to risk to get it. In some ways, Russell Wilson’s name last year was very well saturated and discussed and there were many (all?) who thought the risk of his sub-optimal height was more than their board could bear, at least prior to where he was selected. I definitely wouldn’t equate RW to Mathieu and Rogers but I would use it as a precaution to not get too caught up in saturation. RW, Janoris Jenkins, and Burefict were lessons learned last year, I’m sure there were others. People tend to only remember their most recent lessons learned.

    At end of the day (or second round in this case), I suspect that Seattle has a short list of names for 56 that might push the high risk/reward types out of contention but without the capacity to get a glimpse of that list, who knows? But with their track record, I’m already excited about what this draft will bring to the team whether they select bread-and-butter names, saturated names, or ‘who is that?’ names.

    • Michael (CLT) says:

      Good points, especially your example of Burefict. Do you have examples of Mathieu being an excellent cover corner. Otherwise, he would be a early round backup, with no chance of manning the free safety spot, too small for strong side, and too short to play outside.

      Seems he is fairly limited in opportunities to play for Seattle. Perhaps he could be a special teams ace.

  7. Scott Allen says:

    Now this is something I’m excited about. I hope the workout goes well.

  8. Bill Bobaggins says:

    The Hawks will draft Justin Hunter at #56…if Robert Woods is not around. I just have a feeling.

    • Miles says:

      If we draft a receiver in the second round, I think it will be Ryan Swope. He is perfect for this team, I feel like, and the fact that the Seahawks haven’t even mentioned him once gives me the impression they they are hiding their interest.

  9. Scott Allen says:

    Hey Rob. I was thinking about Cordarelle Patterson and how there seems to be so much debate about whether his physical gifts outweigh his lack of skills and whether or not he deserves a first round pick.

    It got me thinking about what pundits were saying last year and the year before that about various players.

    I’m wondering what became of last years or ’11s character concern players, or big body/small skill guys?

    Of the top 3 or 4 rookies at each position last year, which ones were high picks, which ones late draft sleepers?

    Is there any patterns or solid evidence to back up the concerns the pundits voice about these previous draft participants based on the evidence we can see since they joined the league?

    It seems like this type of “where are they now” type article/post could help us to navigate the BS that pundits are slinging and help us to judge it appropriately.

    Is a post like this something you think would be relevant or even something you would take a shot at?

  10. Michael McGlynn says:

    Seahawks sign Winfield to 1-year deal. Love this signing!!

  11. Madmark says:

    Antoine Winfield has decided to be a Seahawk.

    • Scott Allen says:

      Yay! Another top available free agent signing!

        • Miles says:

          Oh my goodness… This is a major addition for an already dynamic secondary. Now you go and add the best run-defending nickel corner in the league? Not only is this secondary good, but it’s unique, and dangerous. This is going to be a very interesting defense this year.

          It does make me wonder what Thurmond’s role will be on the team. Is he going to get a chance to compete with Winfield? Or, does he become expendable now so that we might trade him for a 4 or a 5?

          • Michael says:

            Does a guy with more DL stints than NFL starts have that kind of trade value? I tend to think not…

            • Miles says:

              Not sure. He has an injury history but he’s still very young and very talented. Plus his contract is minimal. You might be right but, there may be some team that comes along. We got a 5th rounder for Josh Wilson. :P

    • Michael (CLT) says:

      I am very curious as to the details. I wonder if Seattle has accepted they can afford to franchise Chancelor in 2014… or perhaps replace him with a draft pick in 2013 or ’14.

      • Miles says:

        I’m also wondering whether the Hawks see Winfield as strictly a nickel corner or if they plan on using him as a third safety on 3rd-and-long ala Jeron Johnson. He’s not a big guy like Winston Guy (who played that role in the playoff game last year) or like a Charles Woodson who is still out there, but is he a corner who is getting to that age where safety might be a more viable option.

        Then again, he had 104 tackles and 3 INTs last year.

  12. Michael McGlynn says:

    Wide open draft BPA!!! Would love to see Armstead at some point.

  13. Michael (CLT) says:

    Amen. Amen. Amen.

    Let’s pleast move on from the “Honey Badger” and talk about football players.

  14. bjammin says:

    Wow, hopefully this will help 3rd down lapses. And runs against nickel.

  15. Christon says:

    BJ Daniels is my favorite late round QB so I’m glad to see we have some interest. The Eagles would be a natural fit for his skill set so that’s no surprise that they have interest either.

    There are players like Christine Michael who had difficulties with coaches but not the drug bagage that Mathieu and Rogers AND Diva mentality – I would obviously be more willing to take the high risk/reward with Michael and let another team draft the two head cases.

    • Miles says:

      More than anything I think BJ Daniels is an interesting draft pick. I do have serious concerns about his throwing motion; it doesn’t look very good. What do other people think about his throwing motion?

      After Kip’s late-round QB post I am high on Ryan Katz. I would love to see the Hawks draft him in the 7th and get Brice Butler as a UDFA. They played on the same SD St. team and could maintain a practice squad-type duo. Then again I think Katz could beat Brady Quinn in a QB competition.

      The Seahawks have been said to be interested in switching Brice Butler to corner. That’s something we could do, but I also really like him as a receiver. Why change what’s working? Unless the Hawks think he can be Brandon Browner 2.0.

      • Leonard says:

        I think worries about throwing motion are sometimes overblown. Unless it’s too low or too slow. Sometimes a guy like Rivers or Cunningham find something that just works for them. I actually think one of Daniels best attributes is how quick his release is. One of the quickest in this draft class. The only thing I’d criticize is sometimes he winds up a little too much on long passes. You can say that about most QB’s without elite arm strength though.

      • Hawksince77 says:

        It’s not so much his throwing motion as it is his arm strength. He has a college QB arm, not an NFL arm, by the looks of it. Perhaps I am getting the wrong impression watching his tape, but he doesn’t seem able to make the big throws, the stick throws, necessary at the next level.

        • Chris F says:

          I agree. I’ve never thought that his QB skills would transfer well to the NFL. He was actually recruited by FSU, but NOT as a QB. He is a talented kid, but I always thought he might be a better fit as a WR or DB. Since the Hawks now have a loaded secondary and receivers with skills similar to Daniels, maybe they’re looking at him as a potential RB/KR/PR ? In any case, it would be cool to get him into camp to explore the possibilities.

    • Hawksince77 says:

      I am hoping that Michael has attitude issues that PC feels comfortable dealing with. This guy looks like one of the top talents at the position in the draft, and will fall a bit due to his behavior. I think (if his character proves out) that he would be a great value in the 3rd or 4th round. And Seattle has an opening for that 3rd RB on the roster.

  16. kevin mullen says:

    Next it TE depth or competition. I see them asking Miller to take a reduced pay at some point this offseason, or maybe this will be his last…

    • Miles says:

      I don’t think this season will be Miller’s last. Barring a statistical collapse this year, Zach should be on the roster in 2014 as well. He is scheduled to make $6.8 million this year. If the Hawks were going to release him, they would have released him by March 22nd when he was due a $3 million roster bonus.

      But his contract calls for a significant dip in salary in 2014 ($4.8 million) and 2015 ($2.8 million). This is a pretty unusual contract that is built to keep Miller on for the entire length of the deal, in my opinion.

      This means that we have more time than you’d think to draft an eventual replacement. Sefarian-Jenkins next year?

    • Michael (CLT) says:

      Why does everybody think Seattle will restructure Miller when they don’t have to. They will pay him out his contract. He drops to around 2M cap hit next year. They can afford him this year. Pay him in 2013, and enjoy him for the next two. He is one of the best TE in the league.

      • mjkleko says:

        While I’m totally with ya, his salary for 2014 is $4.8m with the cap hit being a little higher due to prorated bonuses. I believe it’s something like $5.5 in 14′ then $3.5 in 15′.

        Hsu tweeted the numbers out a while back, but yeah, his contract was intentionally designed to have 13′ be his big cap year, the “pig in the python” as Hsu put it. After getting through this season, his contract becomes incredibly valuable in relation to his contributions on the field. I would put him in the top 5 of most valuable players on this Seattle squad. He has the ability to make an incredible impact on any given play.

        Also, asking a player in his prime to take a pay cut is just unheard of because it simply won’t happen. If the team asks him to take a pay cut he says “No” because he knows the team won’t cut him. And if they do, his market would easily pay him what he was making, if not more, plus the chance for more guarantees. Heck, it might even be desirable to Miller. And why would he restructure? All that does is push money into his final years, which is entirely what his contract was set up to avoid, as the team wants to have as much money as possible in 14′ & 15′.

        I’m with ya’, it’s easily the most annoying and tiresome comment that’s been uttered (repeatedly) by Seahawks fans all offseaon. Miller is going NOWHERE and his contract will not be touched.

        On the otherhand, MikeRob or McQuistan could easily find themselves out of work after the draft.

        • Michael (CLT) says:

          I am way to attached to MikeRob to see him go. Sometimes you overpay for a guy that glues a team together. I see MikeRob as that glue. That said, the Harvard kid (Juszczyk) was brought in for a visit. Ruskell drove me nuts with his FB drafts. I would prefer to go for the SB this year with MikeRob, Miller, Rice et al “as-is”.

          I do agree McQuistan could find himself being asked to restructure. But remember, McQ is a Cable guy, and a prospective starter that can play all positions. I doubt we mess with McQ in 2013.

        • Jon says:

          Actually about 6 m in both 14 and 15 for Miller. This year is 11. If there is a restructure it will extend him a year and drop this Salary hopefuly to around 6 m cap and extend his contract to 2016 and still have a 5-6 m cap hit. having him count as 24 m against the cap over 4 years is better than 23 m over 3 years which is what he is at now. I could see this happening if they gave more in gaurantees.

    • Leonard says:

      One of my favorite options for TE depth, specifically at the Joker TE is actually listed as a FB. Kyle Juscyzyk from Harvard played at TE and H-Back in college but at 6-1 250 he is more suited as a FB in the NFL. I think he would be really good as a reciever out of the backfield and split out in the slot. All of his numbers at the combine other than forty time would be in the top 1-3 of TE’s. Especially impressive was the 37″ verticle jump. The 4.7 40 is OK too considering his impressive shuttle and 3-cone times. Aside from the numbers he has very good hands and runs really good routes. Very competitive and I assume pretty smart (Harvard). I went back and watched the Senior Bowl and he was actually a very impressive lead blocker too. He had a couple of pancake blocks. He could back up and eventually replace Robinson and also be a weapon in the passing game. Versatility is always good.

    • A. Simmons says:

      Miller has been a workhorse and the epitome of the term football player. Why we would want him to restructure?

  17. Miles says:

    Hey Kip and Rob. Just a suggestion but could you do a piece about kickers please? There are some kicking prospects in the draft but there have also been some very good long-distance kickers who have been trying out at the Super Regional Combines. I think most of them are free agents though (not draft-eligible).

    The most interesting prospect I’ve found is Trey Kramer, who can hit a field goal from 65 yards with ease. For evidence check out the 7:30 mark in this video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6ms8-YwxKk

  18. mjkleko says:

    I remember being at the Green Bay game at the Clink last year and seeing a Packers fan with a Jeff Saturday jersey in the concession line. At first I thought, “Saturday who?” and it took me a minute to remember he had signed with the team. And then I thought, well that’s just lame.

    And now… all I want is a Winfield Seahawks jersey in blue. I suck.

    • Belgaron says:

      I’d like to get some of my favorite Seahawks from the past in the wolf gray jerseys like a 45 Easley…

  19. A. Simmons says:

    Winfield is a great signing. I hope we’re not talking about Tyrann much longer. Him or Flynn or Tebow or any other players that cause strange discussions to emerge.

  20. chris says:

    To be fair Urban Myer was the coach when Percy played at Florida, and never played for Muschamp, who kicked Jenkins off the team.

  21. Patrick G. says:

    Kip, way to call the Seahawks’ interest in BJ Daniels!

    I love him as a 7th round QB.