Eric Ebron (TE, North Carolina) vs Georgia Tech

September 24th, 2013 | Written by Rob Staton

As noted yesterday, there are things I like about Eric Ebron. It looks like he’s got bigger this year without losing any speed or fluidity. Clearly he has a knack for making the spectacular catch — as evidenced by his one-handed touchdown catch. I’m not convinced he’ll be a dominating difference maker in the mould of Jimmy Graham, but certainly he’s a mobile tight end that will make plays in the passing game.

But there is one area that does concern me a little. He appears to play the game at his own pace. It’s hard to put into words, it’s almost a little like he’s going through the motions. The potential is there for all to see, but I think he could be even better.

Jimmy Graham ran a 4.56 at the combine at 6-6 and 260lbs. Jordan Cameron managed a 4.59 at 6-5 and 254lbs. Neither went in the first round, but that’s the way the league is going. That for me is the bench mark for any tight end you want to draft early in the modern NFL. You can find serviceable guys in round two. The league is looking for elite difference makers at the position and they’re few and far between. For Ebron to avoid being yet another second round tight end (at best) he’s probably going to have to run as well as Graham and Cameron.

Have a look at the tape above and let me know what you think.

15 Responses to “Eric Ebron (TE, North Carolina) vs Georgia Tech”

  1. MJ says:

    Good stuff Rob.

    I personally really like Ebron. In fact, I like him much more than ASJ. If Lyerla wasn’t such a knucklehead, I’d have him significantly higher than Ebron, bc I think Lyerla can be that dominant in the NFL with his rare athletic ability and physicality.

    I am not sure what to make of Ebron as a blocker. I could see SEA holding onto Zach Miller for a long time simply due to his blocking ability, which is a dying skill set amongst younger TEs. That said, does Luke Willson develop enough to fill the pass catching TE role? Secondly, would it be advantageous to have 2 pass catching TEs who run legit 4.5s, even if their blocking isn’t the best?

    This is a really intriguing offseason for SEA (including the draft). Part of me thinks they will still be leaning towards an athletic big body on the defensive side in R1 – Hageman, Easley, etc.

    • Miles says:

      Since Lyerla’s stock seems to be free-falling, he could go in rounds 4 or 5. That being said, Luke Willson looked really good last week albeit against a crumbled-up Jaguars team. I think in year two Luke Willson could be ready to be a starting tight end in this league (could). With Zach Miller sticking around another two years after this, Lyerla could be drafted in the 4th or 5th with the same intention the Hawks had for Willson: to take his athletic abilities and develop him into a reliable pass-catching tight end/H-Back.

      I don’t care how Lyerla plays the rest of the year. His best games are ahead of him, and I’d be stoked to get him in the fourth or fifth with the intention of grooming him a bit year one.

      • MJ says:

        Right there with ya. I think Lyerla could ben a very good blocker too.

      • Kenny Sloth says:

        I’m not sure his stock is dropping that much. I think the 4th is wishful thinking.

        • MJ says:

          There are an awful lot of red-ish flags stacking up with Lyerla. I’m not saying he’s Aaron Hernandez, but he’s got enough to make teams think twice.

          That said, I do agree with you that 4th round might be too wishful thinking, but I don’t see him going top 50.

  2. smitty1547 says:

    He made a great catch for TD, but he also aligator armed one over the middle in traffic that made him look awful soft.

  3. Mylegacy says:

    I’m not sold on him. As a runner he’s a big stride – no change of pace – but reasonably fast guy. Great hands. Finds the open spot. As a blocker – no anger or power – just a lot of legs and big arms.

    Is he teachable? Actually, looks more like Williams than Miller. That’s good – but – he’s gotta be able to block to make it with the Hawks.

  4. Miles says:

    The Seahawks released DT D’Anthony Smith today.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/09/24/seahawks-dump-danthony-smith/

    Since the Seahawks gave up a “conditional” pick for Smith, does this mean we get to retain the pick? It would seem silly to trade a pick for a player only to release him three weeks later. I hope we get the pick back.

    Mike Florio words this wrong though; “He arrived in exchange for an unconditional draft pick. It’s unknown whether the condition(s) triggering draft-pick compensation have been satisfied.” If the pick is unconditional, then what condition(s) is he talking about?

    • Colin says:

      Florio talks just to talk. That rumor mill is constantly loaded with misguided information.

      • Michael says:

        Speaking of rumors… We’ve all heard a rumor or two that Josh Gordon is being made available. Does anyone see a reason the Lions wouldn’t be at least making a phone call, given Burleson’s broken arm?

        • Miles says:

          The way Gordon is playing right now, lots of teams should be calling the Browns about the pick. More importantly, I don’t think the Seahawks will be making any kind of serious offer as he will likely require a 2nd or 3rd round pick to obtain. Is he the big-bodied wide receiver the Seahawks have been looking for? If so, he might be worth the 2nd round pick. As a big, tall, lanky receiver who’s putting up big numbers on a dumpy team, he could be a poor man’s Brandon Marshall (that poor man is still pretty rich).

          But if you’re not sure he is that guy, I don’t think a 2nd round pick is really worth it. Better to take a shot at a receiver in the upcoming draft which should be fairly deep with WR talent.

    • Miles says:

      Here’s the answer I was looking for, though it’s not official.

      https://twitter.com/ryanohalloran/status/382633423791079424

      :)

    • Rob Staton says:

      It’s being reported we didn’t lose the 7th rounder we would’ve been expected to give up.