More Schefter on Wilson & an even newer podcast

April 11th, 2019 | Written by Rob Staton

Two things today. I was invited onto the Waxing Lyrical podcast to talk about the Seahawks and the draft. By bit starts 17 minutes in. Check it out below. Plus Adam Schefter has also been giving further thoughts on the Russell Wilson situation today…

145 Responses to “More Schefter on Wilson & an even newer podcast”

  1. Volume12 says:

    Why was the thought that Seattle would only target a blocking TE when they have like 4, Pete mentioned Fant with the TEs, they don’t have a guy who can threaten the seam and give RW an outlet/security blanket, Pete has always wanted a 2 TE set.

    I’m just trying to understand the mindset or frame of mind. Is it because that’s what Seattle has traditionally gone after? Because their a run based offense?

    I say this and watch Drew Sample end up being the pick.

    • ZB says:

      My favorite TE in our range is most definitely Irv Smith jr. I think he is a total stud and not talked about enough. I know he is a bit undersized but he has the pedigree/hands/agility/character and work ethic to be an outstanding TE that will be an a nightmare for LB’s to cover. He is in my top 5 hopeful players the Hawks take with their first pick.

    • j says:

      Do we have four blocking TEs? Dissly is injured, Vannett is not good, and the jury is still out on Dickson. So that leaves Fant as the only guy. I can see why they would be dissatisfied with that.

      Not that we don’t need a playmaker to threaten the seam. That’d be great. But a TE that can block is important too.

      • DCD2 says:

        Jury is still out on Dickson? He’s been in the league for like 10 years. He’s a blocking TE who can catch a bit.

        Dissly is a blocking TE. Fant is an OT posing as a TE.

        Vannett is the only questionable blocker.

        The fact that we were trying to sign ASJ is more telling to me than anything though.

        • j says:

          Dissly is great, and if he was healthy it’d be different. But he is not healthy, and will likely miss the start of next year. Dickson is 32 years old and missed games last season due to injury. Health typically does not improve with age. Fant is not a TE – offers nothing receiving wise.

          Really our TE depth chart to start the season is Dickson, Vannett, draft pick.

          • DCD2 says:

            You’re right about Dissly, but he ‘should’ be back early in the year. Dickson is as healthy as he’s going to be coming into the year and Pete specifically pointed to his blocking as a reason we went after him so early in FA.

            They’re using Fant as a TE, and he was a really good basketball player years ago. He’s been groomed as a tackle for years, but there is some athleticism under that big body. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2ZFpm6qcK4

            Hopefully if they draft a TE, they can do some of both.

      • Jamho3 says:

        Jury still out on Dickson? Dissagree SEA just doesnt wanna pay.

  2. Volume12 says:

    WR Nyqwan Murray would be 3 WRs Seattle has brought in who create YAC.

  3. Jim Nagy said Patriots board has around 75 player. And some teams have more than 300.

  4. Volume12 says:

    I know they met with him at the SR bowl, but does Oregon’s Jalen Jelks have a VMAC visit as well? I’ve seen 2 or 3 people having him listed a such.

  5. Gohawks5151 says:

    SCENE: EXTERIOR. DOWN TOWN SEATTLE

    Russel Wilson walks along the sidewalk. There is mist in the air. The season ready to turn from the cold of winter to the bloom of spring. Russell smiles at all who pass by. He is a nice fellow. Suddenly he stops in tracks. In a panic he pats his jeans pockets. First the front, then the back. Nothing. He tries the side pockets on his jacket. Nothing still. Desperate he tries the pocket near his chest. A quick look inside. Instant relief. Thank you lord. Adam Schefter is still in Russel Wilson’s pocket…. 😉

  6. Trevor says:

    I think what Schefter said was the most logical things said to date and makes a ton of sense.

    Russel Wilson is a Seahawk and likely more valuable to them than any other team. Yet they are hesitant in giving him the contract he is looking for. Why would any other team want to give him that contract and then have to give up a couple of 1st round picks minimum .

    I am guessing the number of potential suitors at that price is basically zero. If a team would magically give them (2) 1st round picks + then I think they would seriously consider it. I just don’t think anyone will. I can’t think of one team that makes sense.

    If a deal is not done by the 15th then I think the most likely scenario is Russ will play this year without a new deal and next year on the tag. Then it will be gone baby gone to the highest big market bidder.

    • Volume12 says:

      In other words, we should enjoy the last bit of the PC era of Seahawk football because all good things must come to an end unfortunately.

  7. Sea Mode says:

    So you’re telling me there’s a chance…? 😉

    Ian Rapoport
    @RapSheet

    The #Giants are doing QB homework for their No. 6 pick, hosting #Oklahoma QB Kyler Murray at their facility today, source said.

    2:26 PM – 11 Apr 2019

  8. Dale Roberts says:

    After a trade down which is the most likely first pick? Thornhill, Collier, Oliver, or Harry?

  9. At the end of the day I cant really see Russell Wilson going anywhere. Franchise QB’s just dont get traded in there prime. Frank Clark could be another story.

    • DCD2 says:

      Yet. If every QB takes this tactic of needing to be the highest paid ever, because it’s their turn to get paid, it will happen. Might not be Russ, but someone’s going to do it. If it works out, it won’t be the last time.

      QB’s are coming into the league more and more prepared. It’s a matter of time before a team says, sorry but we’re taking the picks from the cellar-dweller.

      I wonder if some of the teams who didn’t trade their ‘franchise’ QB’s would go back and do it differently. Stafford, Carr, Dalton, Flacco… Mostly just albatross contracts with nothing to show for it, even though at the time everyone thought you had to because “no one trades a franchise QB in their prime”.

      In order to move on you have to have a viable succession in place. That’s why WAS failed so spectacularly with Cousins and traded with (in no small bit of irony) a KC team that had drafted their heir apparent already.

      Hawks don’t have that contingency in place, so no, they won’t trade RW this year. If they draft a QB because they didn’t get a deal done and they show some promise, who knows. Being willing to trade a franchise QB and finding a team willing to pay market value in both trade capital and salary for that QB is quite another.

      • RealRhino2 says:

        Right. It does make you wonder. I think it’s about job security. I went back a dozen years to see how the teams of the “franchise QBs” that were given 2nd (and 3rd) contracts fared to see WHY so many teams think you just don’t do it.

        06: Aarod – Greatest QB of all time (?) has average 8 wins per year after his rookie contract. Now, some of that is due to injury, but even in those years the team was on maybe a 10-win pace. In the hunt, but not spectacular. But at least he gave them three great years of 12, 10 and 10 wins.

        07: Cutler – Traded to be Chicago’s franchise QB, won 10 games 2x, then 7 and under a bunch of times.

        08: Ryan, Flacco – 12 total seasons, only 3 seasons with 10+ wins, no titles
        09: Stafford: 11, 7, 9, 9, 6 wins
        11: Cam, Dalton – After rookie deals, 6,11,6 and 6,7,5 wins
        12: Luck and Russ won 10 games this year, Tannehill and Cousins stunk

        So I would say so far if you sign your “don’t let ’em leave” franchise QB, history says you might have one great year surrounded by a bunch of mediocrity, where you are in the playoff hunt but not much more.

        Meanwhile, Goff, Wentz/Foles, Cam, Russ 2x, Flacco, Eli, Ben, etc., went to the SB on a rookie deal. So just pick whether it’s okay to sink for 3-4 years then rise up, or to just muddle along in the middle all the time.

        • Trevor says:

          Agree with a lot of what you are saying and have been saying it for a while now. The surest way to assure the Hawks don’t win another SB in the PC era would be to give Russell the $35 mil + APY record setting deal he wants. All it assures is years of mediocrity.

        • AlaskaHawk says:

          I don’t think paying Russell Wilson means the team will decline in strength. Any decent quarterback on a contract will make at least 20 million. So the difference in pay between 20 and 35 million amounts to the signing cost for a single great defensive linemen. Or two offensive linemen. It is a factor but not an overwhelming factor. What would hurt is if Seahawks sign Wilson to a long term guaranteed contract (the other part is he will want guarantees as that is his only advantage over being franchised yearly) and then Wilson was severely injured.

          I wouldn’t mind a rooky QB but I don’t think that solves anything about the QB issue. Other than giving the team more money to use elsewhere. Which is an advantage, but unless you get a Mahone, your giving up a lot too.

        • God of Thunder says:

          Good points but those aren’t all elite QBs. And RW is. Moreover, he’s tougher, better, faster and more competitive than most of them. I can see him being well paid and winning 8-10 games, and getting us into the playoffs for years.

          It seems to me that what happens isn’t just a QB thing. Teams get 3-4-5 years out of their drafted QB on a low salary/first contract. They are very competitive. Then they have to pay the QB. The entire team needs to be retooled, so to speak to reflect the massive change in salary structure. Teams struggle with this. It’s not a rebuild but it’s a tricky retooling.

  10. jujus says:

    Rob is there any way you could provide a link to this audio that circumvents Itunes? I dont have Itunes and I refuse to use it.

  11. All I see is 12s says:

    I still think the colts a very viable option. Guys in their front office were some of the ones who helped draft him. They will be In win now mode and have the cap room to pay him.

  12. KD says:

    General question that I’m hoping someone can shed some light on: Why do the Seahawks FO have so few meetings with prospects relative to other teams? So far SEA has had 23 meetings, but most teams have met with at least twice as many, and a few meetings SEA has had are baffling such as Jake Browning and Jalen Jelks. Do they just take the process slower than everyone else by being extra diligent so they can spend more time with each prospect (still 2 weeks to go…), or are they convinced enough of other prospects that they really just want to do extra homework to fill in where they may have a lack of knowledge. Those are the first two ideas that come to mind, but does anyone else have some insight?

    • DCD2 says:

      I’ll give it my best guess. Browning is a ‘local school’ so doesn’t count against the official 30. Oregon, and thus Jelks may be as well, but I don’t think so. He was actually a more productive player as a junior and in hindsight would have been better served coming out a year earlier.

      Pocic is one example of a guy that they drafted having never done an official or let on that they were interested. Rob or others might know of others, where we tried to mask our interest.

    • charlietheunicorn says:

      There are only 30 official visits (roughly) to VMAC. They however have met with plenty of guys at the combine and senior bowl. They also meet with guys along the way while scouting each season. At least the scouts talk to them, while the HC and GM are hands off until near draft time.

      The official visits to VMAC normally are guys they are looking to bring in via RFA after the draft is completed. At least, that is my read. They rarely bring in the big name guys, though they did bring in a few higher 1st or 2nd round picks this year, which was a bit unusual.

      • KD says:

        Thanks. I wasn’t aware of the official 30 rule, but I should probably clarify a bit. Of the 23 meetings that they have had with players, all but 5 have been official visits, but those remaining 5 were either combine or senior bowl meetings. So why only 5 outside the official 30? Senior bowl meeting included Adderly, Dillard and Jelks, and they only met with Browning and Lonnie Johnson at the combine. I guess this is where I am puzzled as to why they didn’t meet with more players at those events or pro days.

        • DCD2 says:

          Ya, there was a twitter post or something that showed each team and how many visits they had with guys at each position. Hawks were pretty low overall, with safety being the highest number and it being only 5 or so. I think Tampa Bay had met with over 15 WR per that chart.

          There was another that weighted different types of visits (1 point for a meeting and the combine, 2 for a visit at the pro-day, 3 for an official at the team… something like that). Maybe that’s the one you’re talking about?

          Not sure really. Maybe it’s just that the info isn’t completely up to date and accurate. As an example, a reporter asks a prospect “who did you meet with today?” and he says (having met with 12 team officials) “a bunch of teams. The Steelers, the Rams, the Ravens… there were a lot of teams.” Maybe that gets quantified as a visit for each of them and not the 9 others that he did meet with?

          I’m just spit-balling. I have to believe that they are doing their due diligence on anyone that they have interest in though.

        • KD says:

          Looks like I didn’t have all the facts to begin with. I was using walterfootball’s prospect meeting list, but Fieldgulls has a much more comprehensive list. The full list has 43 players listed as having met with the Seahawks. unless the fieldgulls list is unconfirmed, looks like i may have jumped the gun a bit. 😛

      • Volume12 says:

        Not unusual at all. Seattle has selected someone from one of their visits, meetings, etc. with one of their first 2 picks like 4 years in a row.

  13. charlietheunicorn says:

    Giving RW 35M/year = “All it assures is years of mediocrity.”

    Hogwash. I remember what it used to be like, and this is not mediocrity. You at least have a chance for a SB, not 2-14 record like in the 1990s with RW in the building. This is the “golden age” of Seahawks football… enjoy it, because when it is over… we will be sad.

    • Jamho3 says:

      100% Agree. Might add that our halcyon days have coincided with PGA’s control. #Thankful.

    • DCD2 says:

      The thing with the Hawks as it stands right now, is that it does make sense to pay Russ $35M. What else are we hoarding cap space for? We can sign RW, Clark, Bobby and Reed and still be ok cap wise. After that we don’t really have any big cap hits looming.

      Maybe Shaq, maybe Ifedi, maybe McDouglad… We honestly don’t have anyone else who can’t be replaced.

      I started off this ‘saga’ thinking that we should trade Russ, get some picks and regain cap flexibility. I’ve come around to the idea that a 3-4 year extension makes sense. We aren’t likely to get many trade offers, based on the fact that we need a team to have cap space/draft capital/QB need and a belief that RW will make them a contender if they give up the aforementioned cap space and draft capital.

      We have the 3rd most cap space in the league going into next year. Kam comes off the books and likely Doug too. I’m happier paying our guys than joining in the insanity of the UFA market, where average players command ultra-premium prices. If we had a similar ‘big four’ (or 3 or even 2) situation looming next year as well, I might be singing a different tune.

      When his next contract is up, if we’ve drafted well and set up a successor, by all means let’s re-evaluate.

    • Trevor says:

      Since Russ signed his first big extension they have been an 9-10 win team and nothing even remotely close to being an SB contender. Love Russ and hope they can get a deal done that gives them a chance to build a roster around him but that is not likely. No team has figured out how to make thier QB the highest paid and then build a roster to compete for an SB yet in the salary cap era but I hope you are right and the Hawks are the first.

      I have been a Hawks fan for 38 years so I have seen lots of down years I would sooner a couple of those with lots of draft capital and early round picks than another 4-5 years of 9-10 wins wirh everyone talking about how amazing Russ is and how they just need to put a roster around him as he drags them into a Wildcard spot and first round playoff loss.

      Respect your opinion Charlie just disagree as fellow long time Hawks fan.

      • jdk says:

        You keep noting how Seattle hasn’t been a contender since Wilson signed his first extension, but I am not sure I have ever seen you acknowledge the fact that there are far more variables at play than Wilson’s ‘bloated’ contract.

        Here are some 2018 qb cap hits (https://overthecap.com/position/quarterback/2018/):

        Russell Wilson: $23.8

        Flacco, Jackson, and Griffin: $27.5. Sure the Ravens weren’t any more contenders than Seattle, but they had a top 2 defense and a good running game while paying the qb more. The reason they weren’t really contenders is because they didn’t get great quarterback play.

        Luck: $24.4. Again, not real contenders but they had a top ten defense and ran the ball decently.

        Brees: $24. Except for two of the strangest endings in recent playoff memory, the Saints might be two time defending champs. Better defense than Seattle and a strong running game.

        Brady and Rivers: $22 each. Obviously both true contenders. Was it the $1.8 million they saved at the qb position?

        The point is that paying Wilson is not what caused the defense and running game to fall off. It was the inability to keep that roster together because paying everybody was impossible whilst also squandering draft capital and failing to get compensation for leaving Hall of Famers in an effort to win now.

        Continuing to state or imply that Seattle has dropped off since the glory days mostly because of Wilson’s contract is either disingenuous or head-in-the-sand ignorance of the facts.

        Paying Wilson $35+ is a whole different kettle of fish, but Wilson’s first extension was not what caused the downturn.

        Being fiscally responsible apart from the qb position, consistent stock piling of draft capital, good drafting, great coaching, and great qb play are the keys to being a contender. Throwing money at the roster largely doesn’t work, which is why this whole offseason conversation is misguided. If Wilson will sign for under $40, you do it because you can do that and do all the other things listed as well.

      • DCD2 says:

        Trevor, empirically I agree with a lot of what you are saying. I’ve previously made many of the same arguments myself.

        Here are the reasons I can’t reconcile for NOT paying RW.

        The Cap: $35M is lot of money and a lot of the cap. However next year we have $95M in space, Kam coming off for another $12M, Doug possibly (probably?) coming off for another $11M, and if we want it Dickson could be cut for another $3.4M. So worst case is that we have $107M in cap space (less some rookie deals) and likely case that we have ~$120M.

        If we give Frank $22M, Bobby $18M, Reed $15M, that only eats up $55M. Britt’s cap hit for 2020 is $11.66M, so an extension probably wouldn’t change the cap much. So, we are looking at $52-$65M in cap room. What do we do with that? FA is a very inefficient way to build a team. It’s a fine way to supplement one, albeit with value contracts (ie Bennett, Avril). If we signed RW, we would likely have close to $30M in cap space to do that.

        The Trades: As has been pointed out recently, finding a trade partner is monumentally more difficult than merely finding a team that would sign him were he to become a FA. I just don’t think we’re likely to find a team that will pay RW top dollar AND give us a bounty of picks because any team that could is in no shape to compete.

        The Succession: There isn’t one currently. Paxton Lynch is our only QB at the moment. I will grant that our system is one that doesn’t rely on the QB as often as others. It’s not exactly a creative or imaginative offense however. You need to be able to make big throws, make smart throws and improvise. I’m a little terrified of how that might look with Lynch or a rookie running the show.

        With this being said, let me add that I don’t think this will be the case forever. Right now we only have 4 guys wanting/worth big bucks. If we draft well, that will change. If Green turns into something, or Poona, or Hill, or Jamarco Jones, or any other of our young guys, we start getting into tough decisions quickly.

        I think a 4 year deal or a 5 year with little dead money in year 5 will be the outcome. Ideally, it gets done before the draft so that we aren’t spending a top pick on a QB with so little ammo to begin with. Next year with 11 picks, we start taking a QB, and keep taking one each year.

        • DCD2 says:

          One last thought. I would imagine JS wants to structure it similar to Garapolo’s contract, with a huge cap hit for 2020 and front-loaded guarantees. The ancillary effect of doing this is that it makes trading for him in year 3 or so much more appealing to a potential team. This may be a sticking point in negotiations, as nothing would prevent RW from ending up in Jacksonville or Cincinnati.

          Maybe a no-trade clause? Are those even a thing in the NFL?

        • jdk says:

          Let’s hypothesize that the situation comes down to this:

          Somebody breaks out defensively and will command $15 APY on the open market.

          Wilson’s contract demands make it impossible to keep both that guy and Wilson.

          Whom do you keep?

          Even if you say that it would be better to roll with a rookie contract, I would argue that no combination of non-qb players whose contracts sum to $30 million (open market value, not guys outplaying their contracts) is worth as much Wilson in the win column.

          And that’s completely ignoring the conversation about what a crap shoot a rookie qb is and how much harder it is to keep a great defense together for 15 years than it is to build around a great qb for 15 years.

          In my opinion, we’re not talking about Stafford, Carr, or Cousins. We’re not even talking about Newton or Luck. We are talking about a legit year to year MVP candidate at the most important position in the game.

          The only reason we are having this conversation is because Pete wants to win his way and paying Wilson will make that hard to do.

          • Rob Staton says:

            It’ll never come down to Wilson or one single defensive player.

            The Seahawks can keep whoever they want really.

            But the more big names they sign, the more they’ll have to box clever in the draft to fill other needs.

  14. Sea Mode says:

    Jim Nagy
    @JimNagy_SB

    Couldn’t stop watching Dre’Mont (@TheOfficial_80) while I was trying to watch Nick Bosa. One of the best interior pass rushers in this draft. Better prospect than some being mocked in Round 1.

    8:04 PM – 11 Apr 2019

    Chad Forbes
    @NFLDraftBites

    Sheldon Richardson Comp?

    @JimNagy_SB
    Replying to @NFLDraftBites

    Similar tools. Jones has a better motor.

    8:07 PM – 11 Apr 2019

    • Rob Staton says:

      I don’t see Sheldon Richardson at all. Sheldon was more of a prototype DT. Jones more of a specialist pass rusher could play across the line.

      But maybe we should just be pleased that NFL Draft Bites is taking a day off from posting made up rumours…

      • I saw this yesterday. I wonder if he could be on the Seahawks radar. He played a lot of 3 tech at Ohio State but would probably be a better 5 tech in the NFL. Here is some combine numbers next to Malik McDowell.

        McDowell:

        6’6″ 295
        28.5 VJ
        112 BJ
        7.69 3 cone
        4.53 20 yard

        Jones:

        6’3″ 281
        31.5 VJ
        110 BJ
        7.71 3 cone
        4.53 20 yard

        Sure they are different players and McDowell had 14 pounds on him but similar numbers.

        • Rob Staton says:

          Indeed, Jones could be an option for them with a list of others too.

          But I will always urge caution on McDowell comparisons because Malik McDowell could do stuff I’ve never seen a 6-5, 295lbs player do.

          • Sea Mode says:

            Like, for starters, run a 4.85 40yd with a 1.69 10yd split at 295 lbs.

            Jones (not bashing on him, just saying since you threw out an interesting comp) ran 5.12 40yd with a 1.77 10yd split at 281 lbs. So, a good athlete for the position, but not spectacular like McDowell.

            • He ran a good forty time but his other numbers weren’t great. On the field maybe showed greater athleticism but it didnt really show at the combine.

              • But your right, that 5.12 scares you a little. Thats OLIneman territory.

              • Sea Mode says:

                Agreed. And to Rob’s point, a big guy like that being able to rush the edge like he did is rare.

                Interesting by the way, as I was looking at this, I sorted this year’s DT class by 10yd splits. Interesting to see the names at the top and their weight:

                Zach Allen, 281 lbs, 1.65 10yd
                Quinnen Williams, 303 lbs, 1.67 10yd
                Jerry Tillery, 295 lbs, 1.69 10yd
                Khalen Saunders, 324 lbs, 1.73 10yd
                Trysten Hill, 308 lbs, 1.74 10yd
                Daylon Mack, 336 lbs, 1.74 10yd
                Renell Wren, 318 lbs, 1.75 10yd
                Demarcus Christmas, 294 lbs, 1.75 10yd
                Christian Wilkins, 315 lbs, 1.76 10yd
                Dexter Lawrence, 342 lbs, 1.76 10yd

                Just wanted to show that, even though short-area numbers are important for them as well.

                • Rob4q says:

                  There are so many good DT’s in this draft, I really doubt they target one early unless it’s the one guy they really want. Look at Daylon Mack above…he might go RD 4-5 and could be a steal then! I know they signed a couple of EDGE players, but they still need that DE opposite of Clark. Add another TE, a hybrid S/Slot CB and a play making WR and this draft is starting to take shape!

    • Volume12 says:

      Ask Jim if he’s better than 60 prospects since that seems to be how many are reported to be 1st rounders this year.

      • Volume12 says:

        Do these media guys forget that just because one team would willingly take a prospect in round 1, doesn’t mean 31 other teams feel the same? Teams set THEIR boards for a reason. I feel and fear we aren’t too far off from having a consensus big board based on all the mumblings, rumors, and innuendo.

      • Sea Mode says:

        I know, I know. 😃

        I’m not trying to say Nagy’s takes are some type of Draft Gospel either. I just find it interesting to see him pushing back a little bit on some guys some draft media has over-hyped, as well as highlighting some guys many have perhaps overlooked.

        For example, he also posted this the other day on Haskins’ recent “fall”:

        Jim Nagy
        @JimNagy_SB

        Replying to @CarlBanksGIII

        He’s dropping because the media narrative pumped him too high in the first place. Media pumped him too high. The league doesn’t value him nearly as high. A couple media members pushed him. That’s all I can tell you. Feel bad for the player.

        8:54 PM – 10 Apr 2019

        I think most of us here on SDB never rated Haskins as high as many other draft media because we actually watched him before all of the “Top-5 lists” came out and saw for ourselves all those easy throws to incredibly talented WRs. But he has definitely been over-hyped by others.

        • Volume12 says:

          That wasn’t meant as a shot fired at Jim. He should clap back on these dudes. He’s actually helped construct boards, got his hands dirty, and sat in on these things.

        • Rob Staton says:

          The hype has been incredible this year. I remember one draft site with Kelvin Harmon in the top-10, many had Deionte Thompson in the top-10 and many saw Haskins as a the top QB in the draft.

          • Sea Mode says:

            I wonder if any teams ever actually fall into this a little bit?

            I imagine prohibiting their scouts from social media helps, but it’s hard to avoid so much echo in draft media/public opinion on some of these guys.

            • Rob Staton says:

              Without a doubt, people (probably owners more than scouts) will be influenced by the noise.

              If I was a scout or a GM I wouldn’t go on the internet after December.

            • Volume12 says:

              Usually scouts are cut out of the picture after February, but not Seattle. According to Jim, see what I did there, JS actually encourages his scouts to be a part of the final process.

              • DCD2 says:

                They do consider the scouts a part of the draft family and Family Matters. Helps to have guys familiar with the prospects when Pete and John meet them, so they aren’t Perfect Strangers. There were some Growing Pains when they first incorporated the system, but there are some guys that Blossom late and it’s good to have them involved late. They’ve spent a lot of time getting to know these guys and their backstories, their Facts of Life. We know that’s important to Coach, and we know Who’s The Boss.

                Every team will see it differently and use Different Strokes to paint the overall picture. Those are just the Facts of Life.

                Cheers
                ~Alf

        • Volume12 says:

          He’s a QB of course he has. I like Haskins for the record, but am wary of anyone coming out of an Urban Meyer offense.

  15. DCD2 says:

    Here’s another video from PFF responding to Del Rio’s comments.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iu6RiCjozMc

  16. clbradley17 says:

    PFF’s 2019 NFL Draft Profile: QB Will Grier, West Virginia – https://www.profootballfocus.com/news/draft-2019-nfl-draft-profile-qb-will-grier-west-virginia

    2nd highest passing grade behind Murray from a clean pocket, but terrible when moved off the spot, where Murray is also the best by a mile. Definitely shows why Murray is the best QB in the draft, and possibly the best in years.

  17. Sea Mode says:

    Continuing to look at 10yd splits for heavier EDGE guys, besides Rashan Gary, one of them stands out quite a bit:

    John Cominsky, 6052, 286, 33.5 arm, 79.75 wing, 9.75 hand, 4.69 40yd, 1.61 10yd, 4.38 SS, 7.03 3C

    Those are some amazing numbers. And I remember seeing this from Jim Nagy a couple days ago:

    Charleston (WV) DE John Cominsky isn’t being talked about enough. Dominant D-II tape. Answered the small-school doubters at @seniorbowl, particularly in the game. High ceiling. Hearing he could go on Day 2.
    ✅6050
    ✅286
    ✅4.69
    ✅33.5 VJ
    ✅7.03 3-cone

    2:18 PM – 10 Apr 2019

    And fwiw when Chad Reuter suggested a potential comp, Nagy replied:

    Jared Allen isn’t a bad comp…I like it.

    • Seemss like you could almost just draft from the state West Virginia alone. Will Grier, Gary Jennings, Trevon Wesco, and John Cominsky.

    • DCD2 says:

      Just posted his name below and thought I had a hot prospect to drop on everyone… Scroll up and it’s old news to SeaMode. You’re on top of it my friend.

      Pauline has him listed as a 4th round DT. He did play 3 tech quite a bit on the limited tape I watched.

      • Sea Mode says:

        Hehe, it’s all good, my man. We’re a scouting community; we’re in this together! Plus, C-Dog has mocked him to us (albeit in R6…) back on Mar. 4.

        I just looked up Cominsky’s comps on Mockdraftable, and the #1 comp in the last 5 years is Rasheem Green… the other two listed from the last 5 years are Taco Charlton and Bradley Chubb fwiw.

        I can imagine that in D-II, being such a superior physical specimen, they could basically just play him wherever and he would wreak havoc. But maybe the Hawks would see some inside/out potential, as with Green.

        Either way, I’m honestly seeing this type of profile as less likely to be one of our picks given that we have Green in the wings. I mean, if a stud falls to them, they might take him, but otherwise see what Green can give you before you go investing further draft capital into the position, especially in a year where you start with just 4 picks.

        • Thats a good thought process. They obviously no more about Rasheem Greene and how he is evolving than us. If they do go 5 tech that could say they dont think he is the future starter. I still think Winovich could be in play if they dont think they can come to terms with Frank long term. Like the way they could select a QB if RW talks arent going well.

          • That spot next to Reed could be an option as well. Either to fill that gap to maybe to replace in the future. I still think they will sign Danny Shelton sometime in mid May.

  18. Sea Mode says:

    I wonder if the media even needs inside info on this fed to them by Seattle at this point or if it’s just so obvious they just publish it straight up anyway… 😂

    Mike Garafolo
    @MikeGarafolo

    Ohio State WR Parris Campbell is in Seattle this week to meet with the #Seahawks. Seattle doesn’t have a second-round pick, but they’re hoping to change that via a trade down in the first. Only four picks total but bank on them picking up others via trades.

    8:02 AM – 12 Apr 2019

    • Nick says:

      I would adore Parris Campbell. And then if we could pick up someone like Anthony Nelson/Zach Allen/LJ Collier with our second pick…

      • You still have to think it goes WR/DL or DL/WR with the first two.

        • Nick says:

          The only position that potentially interrupts that pattern is S/Big Nickel. Thornhill, Gardner-Johnson, Adderley etc. There’s a pretty big drop off of talent after mid second round. The WR depth in this draft thru the first three-four rounds is excellent.

          I could see them going something like:

          1. Omenihu
          2. Thornhill
          3. Gary Jennings

          • Rob Staton says:

            Thornhill will be gone if they try to take him second up. But it’s very possible they take DL/nickel or nickel/DL first up and wait for receiver. There’s a drop after the first wave at WR. They also could go DL later because that’s where the depth is this year. And there’s a bigger cliff after the top big nickel types go off the board.

          • GauxGaux says:

            1. CGJ
            2. T. Hill
            3. C. Miller
            4. G. Jennings
            5. T. Wesco

            • DCD2 says:

              I like the looks of that!

              • DCD2 says:

                Dillon Mitchell from Oregon might be a later round WR option as well. He definitely has some flags around work-ethic and concentration. He was literally Herbert’s only reliable WR last year though.

                When he was on, he was on. 75 catches for 1,184/10 last year.
                4.46 – 40
                4.29 – SS
                6.93 – 3 cone

                Maybe a name for day 3 if we haven’t got WR addressed.

            • Trevor says:

              That would be an incredible draft! I would prefer Savage to CGJ but either would be a good pick.

              • GauxGaux says:

                Trevor,
                Curious… why Savage over CGJ? Scheme? Combine? Other?
                (personally I really like Murphy after Rob’s article, but so does 31 other teams)

        • Rob Staton says:

          They will either take a WR with the first pick or I think they wait to R4.

      • DCD2 says:

        Collier doesn’t seem like he ticks many boxes for a Hawks target to me. His TEF is under 3 and his speed numbers weren’t very good. His teammate Bonagu seems more Seahawky to me.

        Nelson is intriguing. Maybe John Cominsky as well. He played D2, but his testing numbers are some of the best in this class.

  19. SamL says:

    Wow the draft is only 13 days away and the Russell Wilson deadline in 3. A lot is about to happen over the next two weeks and I can’t wait.

  20. Sea Mode says:

    Yeeeeessss!!!!

    Walker said he’s scheduled to fly out and visit with the Seattle Seahawks on April 16.

    “It doesn’t matter to me where I get drafted, my presence will be felt in the NFL,” Walker told DawgNation. “Whatever my team wants. If I need to gain weight, I could play at 260 or 265, and if I need to drop, I could get down to 245.”

    https://www.dawgnation.com/football/georgia-dandre-walker-nfl-groin-workout-scout

    • Volume12 says:

      Certainly wasn’t forgotten during the CFB season itself, but has been during this pre-order process probably due to him not testing?

      Incredibly ‘Seahawky’ style of play.

      • Volume12 says:

        *pre draft

      • Sea Mode says:

        Yup. Injury forcing him out of Sr. Bowl, where I think he would have turned heads perhaps even more than in testing.

        BAMF + APM (activity problem maker) = on Seahawks radar.

        Posted this from Nagy a couple months ago:

        this from Jim Nagy a couple months ago:

        “D’Andre was a guy, for me, going back to the scouting process at Seattle, you’re putting on tape last year watching (Davin) Bellamy and Lorenzo Carter, and to me, 15 (Walker) should have been playing over both of those guys,” Nagy said.

        “Every time he was on the field he was disruptive,” Nagy said. “If you did a per play disruption …. every time the guy stepped on the field, he was making something happen.”

    • Volume12 says:

      Doubt he’s the athlete Frank Clark was, but might just be the closest thing to him in this year’s draft.

      • Trevor says:

        If I had to pick two guys to bet would be Seahawks on draft day it would be Walker and Alec Ingold if they pick up a 7th round pick after trade backs.

        Walker seems like a classic Hawks pick.

  21. Can someone post a link to Rob’s articles about Dandre Walker, I cant find them now?

  22. Trevor says:

    I think of all the supposed draft experts on TV that Louis Riddick might be my favorite. Always has some solid takes and insights.

  23. Trevor says:

    Greedy Williams does not have one single top 30 visit planned. That’s kind of odd isn’t it?

  24. RealRhino2 says:

    Interesting info from the Ross Tucker podcast with Andrew Brandt, former agent and Packers exec. He says he has sources that have told him the issue with the Hawks and Russ is not money, but the length of the guarantee. He suggests the Hawks would actually be happy to push more money to him if he’ll agree to their “standard” 1-year guarantee.

    According to Brandt, the Hawks — like the Steelers — have made it a policy to only give contracts with the first year guaranteed, with “rolling” guarantees for subsequent years (i.e., roster guarantee: if you’re on the roster on this date, that year’s salary becomes guaranteed). Russ wants multiple years guaranteed up front, the Hawks don’t want to set that precedent.

    Thought it was interesting, as I’d always assumed it was about total $$ or yearly average.

    • GerryG says:

      Russ wants 100+ guaranteed for sure

    • charlietheunicorn says:

      John Clayton and Jake Heaps in Seattle have both said more or less the same thing.

      The sticking point might be a 3 year guaranteed deal
      AND
      highest paid player in NFL (temporarily)…. at the same time.

      Almost every NFL team will trade guaranteed money for less total money in a contract.
      The hot rumor is the agent for RW is trying to reset and redo how NFL contracts work, to follow a model much closer to MLB…… : /

      • I saw this from Joel Corry as well. I looked at Russ’s last contract and it was just the first year guaranteed at signing. However Bobby Wagner’s deal had the second year guaranteed so I just dont think it has to do with the second year. So did Sherman and Thomas. Maybe the third year?

  25. CaptainJack says:

    Anyone else like maxx Crosby out of Eastern michigan?

    Seems like he could turn into a real player in the Nfl in a couple of years.

  26. Trevor says:

    I was thinking about Pete’s coaching style and philosophy last night and how it impacts the Hawks draft decisions. He wants a physically dominant team that can bully the opposition and impose thier will both defensively and offensively. That is why being able to run the ball on offense and stopping the run on defence seems to be priority #1 at all times.

    With this in mind I think almost without exception,if you are drafting in the 20s or later, the first two picks each year should be DL or OL. Depending on the draft class you could potentially double up at either position. Then the rest of the draft round out your roster with high upside elite athletes and then coach them up.

    The one exception to this rule would be if you have a top 10 pick or are in need of a QB and fall in love with a guy you think can be a starter.

    • Nick says:

      Well-articulated Trevor. And a good reminder about what PCJS value. They want to be full of BAMFs. On DL in the late 20s to early 30s…who embodies that? Ben Banogu is a freaky athlete and plays with a nasty streak. They’ve shown great interest in TCU so far…he ran a 1.47 ten yard split for goodness sake!

      I know Rob and others have spoken about him at length, but I really feel like he has a shot of being our first pick (and just wait for Seahawks Twitter to flip the f out).

      • Rob Staton says:

        I can’t see Banogu being an early pick for Seattle. He’s just an athlete at the moment. They might take him later on as an Obum Gwacham type project but not the first pick.

        • Nick says:

          Interesting. Not sure I share that perspective, tbh. He has insane upside—also his production is far superior to someone likee Gwacham. Gwacham had 4 sacks in his college career. Banogu has had eight sacks two seasons in a row. Also, Banogu was a captain and played against some solid competition in the Big 12. That sort of profile is very Seahawky, and without their second round pick, they may feel the need to get their guy at an earlier stage than they’d necessarily like.

          • Rob Staton says:

            He can’t rush the passer Nick.

            Go and watch his tape. He has no clue what to do. He either wins by running clean to the QB or he doesn’t win. There’s no hand-use, no counter, no bull rush, no club/rip, no disengage, no proper use of his length. He’s just an athlete. He will have to learn to become a pass rusher from scratch.

            I watched him a few weeks ago and his best aspect was the ability to cover ground in space against sweeps and reverses. If I was drafting him I’d move him to linebacker. If you’re going to have to coach him into pass rush you might as well coach him to be a linebacker.

            • Nick says:

              I have watched about six of his games and yes he doesn’t have many pass rushing moves and very limited bend. Most of his pressures come from inside stunts. His motor can go cold on some plays. However, there are also some incredible, freakish qualities there too. You often say focus on what a player can do and that applies in this situation. I agree that he’s a big project, but I don’t think his evaluation is as simple as you’re making it out to be.

              • Rob Staton says:

                I listed everything he doesn’t do as a pass rusher — all of the fundamentals. No hand-use, no counter, no bull rush, no club/rip, no disengage, no proper use of his length. To reply and basically admit that is all correct but he’s a great athlete and then accuse me of offering only a simple evaluation is a bit disappointing Nick.

                Again — if people want to counter and show me where he consistently shows a level of pass rushing ability and that you won’t have to start from absolute scratch with him, I’m all ears. We won’t get it though because I’ve seen him play. I’ve studied his games. He’s an athlete, not a pass rusher.

                In fact I’d say focusing on what he ‘can’ do with Banogu is exactly what I’m doing. I wrote a piece highlighting his best asset which was playing in space and covering ground. It’s why I suggested he’s best served converting to linebacker. I think he can be a good linebacker based purely on his athletic profile. And if you’re coaching him up from scratch you might as well do it at a position where he’s better suited.

                But I don’t get all this hype that’s suddenly emerging. Take him with Seattle’s first pick?!?! No way. There’s no evidence at all for any conviction about him as a NFL pass rusher. He’s exactly the type of project Gwacham was. Just a big enormous project with the same chance of panning out.

                • Nick says:

                  I should have been more thorough in my response–typing on my phone is awful.

                  Here is an example of a club rip move on the outside: https://twitter.com/JonahTulsNFL/status/1020387280077447168

                  Here is him showing a lovely little swim move:
                  https://twitter.com/JamesThomasHT/status/1043541650855755777

                  Here is some excellent hand placement and strength:
                  https://twitter.com/benbanogu/status/1088550891626680320

                  Here he shows terrific upper body strength and then explosion to get to the QB:
                  https://twitter.com/RussNFLDraft/status/1081383769804861441

                  Anyways, I don’t offer these plays to change your mind, but to at least erase the idea that I provided a disappointing discussion on this site. I didn’t mean to offend–I’m not sure exactly why this has gotten so heated.

                  • Rob Staton says:

                    I wouldn’t call the first clip an example of a club/rip personally. He swipes/chops at the hands of the right tackle who completely overextends and once Banogu gets to the outside he’s reaching with absolutely no hope of containing his speed to the edge. That to me is an expression of quickness and athleticism against an overmatched college tackle.

                    I can’t watch the second clip because that James Thomas fellow started trashing me on Twitter, someone added me to the conversation and I said, ‘at least James is here to tell us how it is’ and he blocked me.

                    On the third clip — the first rush is against a tight end. The second is against Kaleb McGary and I have absolutely no idea what McGary is doing. I didn’t recall seeing that in Mobile. McGary doesn’t get anywhere deep enough in his drop, then doesn’t get his hands on Banogu. You can’t do that against him and McGary won’t be able to do that against any NFL pass rusher either. Poor from the tackle. Nice quickness from Banogu but again — that’s athleticism not engage/disengage or winning with power/hands. He just runs by him. There’s some hand contact but not much.

                    On that last play he’s stood up and moving around pre-snap. He settles into a wide stance and I have no idea why the right tackle takes two steps to his right off the snap. He isolates himself! Pause the video after his second step and look at the space either side of him. He basically puts himself on an island against the best athlete on the field. He needed to hold his position and play inside out. Banogu is so wide there, it should be easy. Banogu rightly accepts the invitation to jump inside given the grand canyon in the B-gap and then pulls a nice double move to the outside. The tackle basically grabs at him and tries to hold him to stop him getting past. I’m not sure how this can be described as terrific upper body strength. It’s terrible technique by the tackle and then Banogu uses his superior athleticism to side-step him. It’s all about quickness. And that’s the point I always make with Banogu. Great athlete and he flashes that. But in terms of being a pass rusher and doing the things needed to translate to the next level — he’s at ground zero. You need to coach practically everything from scratch. L.J. Collier is the total opposite. Amazing hands, power, ability to disengage. If you put Collier and Banogu together you’d have a top-10 pick.

                    Please don’t feel it got heated. I never sensed any heat. Just a debate.

  27. DCD2 says:

    Going defense top 3 is certainly an option. I could see Banogu or Walker with our first pick, then Hill with our second and Tell with our 3rd. WR, TE, OL to fill out the back along with depth at BPA.

    This of course blows up a bit if the RW negotiations stall out, and they feel the need to draft a QB early.

    • Rob Staton says:

      I don’t get all this Banogu talk.

      Think people are looking at the athleticism and not the tape. The two have to go hand in hand. There’s a reason Lance Zierlein grades him in round six. I think he’s at best a day three project. He’s not a pass rusher.

      • DCD2 says:

        I’ like the looks of Walker more as well. However, Pauline has him rated right around Walker (2nd/3rd) and the previous poster had mentioned him, so I included his name. This was from FG:

        “If you asked me right now who I believe will be the Seahawks’ first pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, Banogu would be my pick. Like Gary, he checks all of Seattle’s athletic boxes, and is actually an ever better athlete (97th percentile) than Gary. Not only is Banogu incredibly explosive, his short shuttle—of great importance to the Seahawks—was fourth among EDGEs at the Scouting Combine. Banogu combines explosiveness, agility and production, with 17 sacks, 34.5 tackles for loss and 109 pressures in two seasons at TCU.

        Putting on our draft conspiracy hat, we have reason to believe Seattle is indeed interested in Banogu. They’ve shown interest in Banogu’s teammate and fellow edge rusher L.J. Collier numerous times—at his pro day, at the combine and a top-30 visit—despite Collier being remarkably outside their mold. The Seahawks apparent interest in Collier is not them ignoring the guidelines they’ve followed for nearly a decade; it’s just standard draft season operating. On draft weekend it will be Banogu, not Collier, who they circle back to.”

        I would assume that yes, people are looking at his numbers and as above, the production. He also seems like he’s got a good attitude, and fits with Pete’s kind of guy. Definitely raw, but I think round 3 is more likely than round 6.

        https://www.profootballfocus.com/news/draft-ben-banogu-is-eager-grow-as-a-pass-rusher-feels-he-has-the-highest-ceiling-in-the-draft

        • Rob Staton says:

          It’s funny really.

          People have no problem quoting other articles to counter my views, despite the fact you all know how much time I spend watching these players.

          And yet, as with the quote above, not even a single reference to Banogu’s tape. Just stats, athleticism and they met with Collier (so of course they’re after Banogu…).

          • DCD2 says:

            Well, you asked what the Banogu talk was all about. I referenced Pauline who you’ve said you respect and an article that addresses that he’s raw, played one year of HS football, one year of JC and that TCU ran scheme-specific defenses and didn’t teach much technique. He talks about overloading his school schedule so that he had more time to watch tape, practice moves on his own and try to develop that part of his game.

            I honestly haven’t watched any tape of Banogu, that’s why I’m citing other sources, that I didn’t think you would just dismiss. I will look more and give you my thoughts, but was just responding to the “I don’t get all this Banogu talk” with what others are saying.

            • Rob Staton says:

              I didn’t ask what the Banogu talk was all about. I said I didn’t get it. I think he’s increasingly overrated and while a great athlete, basically a day-three project. I respect Tony immensely but it doesn’t mean I agree with everything he says. As for the Field Gulls piece — I didn’t dismiss it. I stated that I think it’s funny that people come on to a draft blog where they know I watch tape and then try and counter my views with quotes from other sites where, in this instance, the author seemingly hasn’t watched the player in question at all.

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