Kendall Wright (WR, Baylor) game tape vs Texas

December 11th, 2011 | Written by Rob Staton

Tape courtesy of JMPasq

18 Responses to “Kendall Wright (WR, Baylor) game tape vs Texas”

  1. Ryan says:

    For what it’s worth, my calculations say that:

    - A loss vs. STL on Monday leaves the Hawks on pace to draft 11th, ahead of BUF, KC, and ARZ

    - A win vs. STL leaves them on pace to draft 14th.

    Do with that what you will.

  2. Rob says:

    Thanks Ryan.

    Do you have the draft order to hand in full for Wednesday’s new mock?

  3. Peter says:

    At the expense of kissing internet butt, Rob, yesterday I watched the AZ vs. SF game and and have now come away with a new found appreciation for the idea of a game changing wide receiver. Obviously anyone with a brain knows that Larry Fitzgerald is fantastic, but he took the game away from SF, with a mediocre QB. I can see the definite power of having a wide receiver like that.

    At approximately the 1:07 mark Kendall Wright appears to pluck the ball away from a defender. It’s a pretty nice play from a an alleged “smurf” (god I hat that term) WR.

    You’ve watched a lot more of him this season. How is he in traffic, and how is he when forced to fight a CB for the ball?

  4. Rob says:

    He’s very competitive, not just in fighting for the ball but also when being jabbed at the line. His best skill is the extreme speed, but he plays above his size when compteting with bigger CBs – an issue Golden Tate had even though he was very competitive fighting for the ball in the air. Clearly Wright isn’t going to have a similar impact to Fitzgerald, but he can be an offensive X-factor who puts up big yardage, makes big plays and constantly offers a threat. He’s in the Mike Wallace, DeSean Jackson bracket for me. This isn’t a defined mock where I’m saying he’s a must draft, but if we’re looking at non-QB options I see no reason to not include Wright as an option.

  5. Tom says:

    Peter,

    Larry Fitzgerald has the BEST hands in the NFL, Kendall Wright has always had average hands. It doesn’t mean Wright can’t make a nice catch because he has excellent body control but to even think that a 5’10 receiver can be compared to a 6’3″ leaper in Fitz with the BEST hands in the NFL is totally absurd.

  6. John says:

    Tom,

    Peter was simply stating that he can see how having a game changing reciever can impact an offense. No where did he ever state that Fitzgerald and Wright are the same calliber of WR.

  7. Rob says:

    Tom – please stop using the word ‘smurf’. Wright’s height is irrelevant to his ability. The top three leading receivers for yardage in the NFL right now? Wes Welker (5-9), Steve Smith (5-9) and Victor Cruz (6-0). Being 6-3+ is not essential to being a productive NFL receiver.

  8. Ryan says:

    What I come up with:

    1. Colts (0-13, 114 wins)
    2. Vikings (2-11, 118)
    3. Rams (2-11, 121)
    4. Redskins (4-9, 95)
    5t. Jaguars (4-9, 105)
    5t. Panthers (4-9, 105)
    7. Dolphins (4-9, 109)
    8. Browns (4-9, 110)
    9. Buccaneers (4-9, 112)
    10. Eagles (5-8, 102)
    11. Bills (5-8, 107)
    12. Chiefs (5-8, 109)
    13. Cardinals (6-7, 96)
    14. Seahawks (6-7, 104)
    15. Chargers (6-7, 111)
    16. Cowboys (7-6, 95)
    17. Titans (7-6, 98)
    18t. Bengals (7-6, 106)
    18t. Giants (7-6, 106)
    20t. Bears (7-6, 109)
    20t. Raiders (7-6, 109)
    22. Falcons (8-5, 98)
    23. Jets (8-5, 101)
    24. Broncos (8-5, 107)
    25. Lions (8-5, 113)
    26. Texans (10-3, 90)
    27. Saints (10-3, 92)
    28. Patriots (10-3, 93)
    29. 49ers (10-3, 94)
    30. Ravens (10-3, 101)
    31. Steelers (10-3, 102)
    32. Packers (13-0, 95)

    Regarding the tiebreakers, NFL.com says “…such ties shall be broken by strength-of-schedule. If any ties cannot be broken by strength-of-schedule, the divisional or conference tie-breakers, if applicable, shall be applied. Any ties that still exist shall be broken by a coin flip.”

    I find this a little vague, since, for example, is head-to-head considered a conference tiebreaker? It is when considering playoff seeding. Or is it just referring to conference W-L? Anyway, I haven’t broken the ties between Jags-Panthers, Bengals-Giants, Bears-Raiders because they aren’t in the same division or conference, and I don’t know if the NFL considers them applicable anymore.

  9. John_S says:

    Kendall Wright may not be Larry Fitzgerald, but he does have the capability of blowing the top off of the defense and take it the distance at any time.

    Sort of like this guy….
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqQ75O5r1BA

  10. Tom says:

    Hey John, thanks for clarifying Peter’s statement as I mis-interpreted his post and potential comparison, my bad.

    I just didn’t want a Hawk brethren to think that because Fitz at 6’3″ and arguably in the top 3 greatest WR hands in the history of the NFL “who took the game away from SF, with a mediocre QB” that he would wake up on Sundays watching the Hawks and expect Kendall to do the same with a mediocre QB.

    Mediocre QB’s like Shelton or Kolb can just toss the ball up and Fitz will acrobatically go up with 2 or 3 db’s and make the catch. Look no further than the Fitz TD reception against the Hawks earlier this season. That’s not Wright’s game. You need a quality QB for Wright and not mediocrity.

    I wouldn’t want him to be expecting more and be disappointed.

  11. Tom says:

    Rob, what is so wrong with calling Wright a ‘smurf’ WR? I grew up old school and clearly remember the old Washington Redskin receivers being called the smurfs. They were 5’10 and below in stature but excellent receivers.

    Gary Clark was a wicked receiver and awesome to watch. If you don’t remember here are a few links about the ‘smurfs’.

    Smurfs[104] Gary Clark, Alvin Garrett, and Charlie Brown

    1980s Redskins’ receiving corps; because of their diminutive size (Garrett was 5’7”, Clark was 5’9”, and Brown the tallest at 5’10”), comparing them to the tiny blue comic and cartoon characters.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NFL_nicknames#cite_note-103

    http://deadspin.com/196440/nfl-season-preview-washington-redskins?tag=sportsnfl

    I really like Kendall Wright but how many slot receivers do the Hawks need, especially with Baldwin stepping up and cementing a spot on this team for the near future. It’s really a crowded position now.

    Sorry if you don’t like the smurf reference. It’s officially retired from my vocabulary.

  12. Rob says:

    It just sounds derogatory, and I’d rather discuss skill sets. I wouldn’t classify him as a slot receiver at all, he’s a deep ball receiver who makes explosive plays. Mike Wallace and DeSean Jackson don’t play in the slot, neither are the tallest or most physical. Those are the players I’d compare to Kendall Wright.

  13. Colin says:

    Why is Kendall Wright limited to being a slot receiver, Tom?

  14. Tom says:

    Rob,

    Sorry if it sounded derogatory. It’s one of the classic WR nicknames of all time and far from derogatory.

    If you want your readers to discuss skill sets here’s another write up for Kendall. Remember, I really like Wright and would love a package of RG3 and Kendall on the squad but WR is our deepest position and unnecessary to stockpile.

    It’s o.k. to have differing opinions. I’m not calling your views wrong or incorrect, we just have differing views of what the Hawks need to be serious contenders in the NFC.

  15. Tom says:

    Forgot the Wright link and info.

    http://nfldraftmonsters.com/scouting/wide-receivers-scouting/preliminary-scouting-report-kendall-wright/

    Size: Wright is only listed at 5’10”, 190 pounds but he is well built for his size and could probably add 5-10 pounds of weight to help him withstand even more hits than he takes in college. He is big enough to take big hits and still hang onto the ball, plus it helps him run through arm tackles and other contact.

    Speed: Wright has very good speed. I would estimate it in the low 4.4’s, and his listed 40 yard dash time is 4.42. He can burn defenders downfield and get vertical very easily. He is definitely going to be a deep threat in the NFL whether as an outside receiver or more likely as a slot receiver. He is very hard to keep from getting behind the secondary, and it is almost impossible to keep him from being you one on one in man coverage. He is lethal on double moves, especially when Griffin works in a good pump fake.

    Quickness: Wright has very impressive burst, acceleration and change of direction speed. He can make guys miss in the open field because of how fast he can accelerate from a still position to running full speed. He has good burst in and out of cuts which helps him create separation when he runs routes.

    Release: I don’t think I have seen Wright get pressed once in the four games I have watched of him so far, and I believe that is a direct result of teams worrying about him beating them deep. That is a very rational fear, and due to his relative strength for his size I think it would be tougher to jam him at the line of scrimmage than many might expect. However, I can’t say I have seen him get jammed or pressed at the line, so I am waiting to see how he handles that. Has a good get-off from the line of scrimmage when allowed a clean release.

    Route Running: Wright runs good routes and has the athleticism to create separation in the NFL. I believe his routes could use some polish, but overall I was impressed by the separation he was able to create. He changes directions effectively, bursts in and out of his cuts, plants his foot effectively to drive into the route, and does a good job of setting up defenders when running routes. This is exemplified very easily when he runs double moves as he sets up the defender to think that he is running a curl or an out, then he burns them deep.

    Hands: Wright’s hands are good, but not great. He has made some very impressive catches in traffic and has more than enough ability to make catches above his head and away from his body. However, he tends to body catch at times which concerns me a bit. I don’t think he will have many issues with drops in the NFL, but his range as a receiver isn’t what it could be because of his hands. Like I said, he has good hands, just doesn’t have great hands.

    Body Control: Wright has very impressive body control in my opinion. He displays this effectively when running routes, adjusting for the ball in the air, and when he attempts to get his feet in when he is near the sideline. He also displays this effectively when making people miss when running after the catch. There is no better example than when he seemed to be walking on a tight rope to avoid falling out of bounds and managed to do it just long enough to dive into the endzone for a touchdown against Kansas State earlier this season. The body control that required was astronomical. Here is a clip of it for those that did not see it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrSwC2-RBnk

    In Traffic: Wright is one of the best receivers I have ever seen in traffic for being so short. He’s not a big guy, but I have seen him take some pretty vicious hits as he’s catching a pass and I don’t know if I’ve ever seen him drop one of them. He’s a tough guy to dislodge the ball from, and he’s willing to take a hit to come down with the ball. Because of his height he isn’t a great jump ball receiver, but he has the leaping ability to contest passes high above his head and can come down with them if he can get his hands on the ball.

    YAC: Wright is a master of YAC. He is lethal in the open field because of his great combination of speed, acceleration, change of direction speed and his ability to run through arm tackles. He can break tackles with his strength and then take off for additional yardage or he can make you miss with his agility and gain additional yardage that way. He is very versatile.

    Blocking: Baylor doesn’t run the ball a lot and a lot of the screen passes they throw to receivers involve Wright getting the ball, so evaluating him as a blocker hasn’t been as easy as I expected it to be. Due to his strength and his competitiveness I would anticipate him being a solid blocker in spite of his size, but this is a facet of his game I need to evaluate further.

    Overall: Kendall Wright is a very talented receiver. He is one of the best slot receiver prospects in this class and has a lot of upside once he gets to the NFL. He’s a very versatile and talented athlete that should have a significant impact from the slot in the NFL. He is very explosive and can threaten teams vertically, gain yardage after the catch to turn a short gain into a long one, take reverses as a ball-carrier and has a pretty good arm for a wide receiver. He even made a stick throw on a trick play where he caught a pass behind the line of scrimmage and then threw the ball back to Robert Griffin in between two defenders! He’s got plenty of potential for trick plays in the NFL, and should be able to have an instant impact if he gets drafted into the right situation. He is a good route runner with the potential to get better, he has good enough hands to make big plays but also be reliable on critical downs, he has the speed and athleticism to threaten teams vertically and is a very intense competitor with impressive toughness. He’s got the whole package and he still has ways he can improve his game.

    Projection: Mid-late 2nd round: I don’t think Wright will be able to work his way into round one consideration, but I think he could go anywhere in the 2nd round where he would present an awful lot of value for a team looking for a player who can get behind defenses for big plays as well as gain yardage after the catch which every NFL team is looking for these days. He’s a very good prospect with plenty of NFL upside, but his height will hold him back a bit.

  16. Drew says:

    Rob,
    wanted to point out that mike wallace is 6’1” and Desean Jackson has been pretty quiet this year because of a deep safety shutting him down.

    But, I really don’t see wright offering much more than baldwin does right now. The short, speedy receivers are the kind of picks you can get in later rounds for athleticism. If we draft RGIII and wright is available in the second and is best available then I say go for it. Bu we have too many other needs to take a luxury WR. I respect your opinion and know that everyone will hold their own towards drafts but just don’t see this happening.

    Most mocks i see have wright as a mid-second right now, not sure I see him in the first myself.

    I will admit that we probably do need another WR eventually but with the guys we have now we can get by. Too many other holes to go WR in the first. (I’m hoping RGIII stays in school and we trade down to build picks next year for him and still fill holes this year)

  17. Tom says:

    Let’s discuss.

    Size: Wright is only listed at 5’10”, 190 pounds but he is well built for his size and could probably add 5-10 pounds of weight to help him withstand even more hits than he takes in college. He is big enough to take big hits and still hang onto the ball, plus it helps him run through arm tackles and other contact.

    Speed: Wright has very good speed. I would estimate it in the low 4.4’s, and his listed 40 yard dash time is 4.42. He can burn defenders downfield and get vertical very easily. He is definitely going to be a deep threat in the NFL whether as an outside receiver or more likely as a slot receiver. He is very hard to keep from getting behind the secondary, and it is almost impossible to keep him from being you one on one in man coverage. He is lethal on double moves, especially when Griffin works in a good pump fake.

    Quickness: Wright has very impressive burst, acceleration and change of direction speed. He can make guys miss in the open field because of how fast he can accelerate from a still position to running full speed. He has good burst in and out of cuts which helps him create separation when he runs routes.

    Release: I don’t think I have seen Wright get pressed once in the four games I have watched of him so far, and I believe that is a direct result of teams worrying about him beating them deep. That is a very rational fear, and due to his relative strength for his size I think it would be tougher to jam him at the line of scrimmage than many might expect. However, I can’t say I have seen him get jammed or pressed at the line, so I am waiting to see how he handles that. Has a good get-off from the line of scrimmage when allowed a clean release.

    Route Running: Wright runs good routes and has the athleticism to create separation in the NFL. I believe his routes could use some polish, but overall I was impressed by the separation he was able to create. He changes directions effectively, bursts in and out of his cuts, plants his foot effectively to drive into the route, and does a good job of setting up defenders when running routes. This is exemplified very easily when he runs double moves as he sets up the defender to think that he is running a curl or an out, then he burns them deep.

    Hands: Wright’s hands are good, but not great. He has made some very impressive catches in traffic and has more than enough ability to make catches above his head and away from his body. However, he tends to body catch at times which concerns me a bit. I don’t think he will have many issues with drops in the NFL, but his range as a receiver isn’t what it could be because of his hands. Like I said, he has good hands, just doesn’t have great hands.

    Body Control: Wright has very impressive body control in my opinion. He displays this effectively when running routes, adjusting for the ball in the air, and when he attempts to get his feet in when he is near the sideline. He also displays this effectively when making people miss when running after the catch. There is no better example than when he seemed to be walking on a tight rope to avoid falling out of bounds and managed to do it just long enough to dive into the endzone for a touchdown against Kansas State earlier this season. The body control that required was astronomical. Here is a clip of it for those that did not see it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrSwC2-RBnk

    In Traffic: Wright is one of the best receivers I have ever seen in traffic for being so short. He’s not a big guy, but I have seen him take some pretty vicious hits as he’s catching a pass and I don’t know if I’ve ever seen him drop one of them. He’s a tough guy to dislodge the ball from, and he’s willing to take a hit to come down with the ball. Because of his height he isn’t a great jump ball receiver, but he has the leaping ability to contest passes high above his head and can come down with them if he can get his hands on the ball.

    YAC: Wright is a master of YAC. He is lethal in the open field because of his great combination of speed, acceleration, change of direction speed and his ability to run through arm tackles. He can break tackles with his strength and then take off for additional yardage or he can make you miss with his agility and gain additional yardage that way. He is very versatile.

    Blocking: Baylor doesn’t run the ball a lot and a lot of the screen passes they throw to receivers involve Wright getting the ball, so evaluating him as a blocker hasn’t been as easy as I expected it to be. Due to his strength and his competitiveness I would anticipate him being a solid blocker in spite of his size, but this is a facet of his game I need to evaluate further.

    Overall: Kendall Wright is a very talented receiver. He is one of the best slot receiver prospects in this class and has a lot of upside once he gets to the NFL. He’s a very versatile and talented athlete that should have a significant impact from the slot in the NFL. He is very explosive and can threaten teams vertically, gain yardage after the catch to turn a short gain into a long one, take reverses as a ball-carrier and has a pretty good arm for a wide receiver. He even made a stick throw on a trick play where he caught a pass behind the line of scrimmage and then threw the ball back to Robert Griffin in between two defenders! He’s got plenty of potential for trick plays in the NFL, and should be able to have an instant impact if he gets drafted into the right situation.

    He is a good route runner with the potential to get better, he has good enough hands to make big plays but also be reliable on critical downs, he has the speed and athleticism to threaten teams vertically and is a very intense competitor with impressive toughness. He’s got the whole package and he still has ways he can improve his game.

    Projection: Mid-late 2nd round: I don’t think Wright will be able to work his way into round one consideration, but I think he could go anywhere in the 2nd round where he would present an awful lot of value for a team looking for a player who can get behind defenses for big plays as well as gain yardage after the catch which every NFL team is looking for these days. He’s a very good prospect with plenty of NFL upside, but his height will hold him back a bit.

  18. Rob says:

    Drew – Wallace is 6-0… and I think Jackson’s ineffective season is down to a lot more than being shut down by a safety. He held out, he’s seen that team throw money at everyone except their best receiver. He’s a pending free agent who’s going to get franchised. There’s a lot of issues there.

    Tom thanks for the link. It’s a different take, one that I disagree with, but that’s Draft Monsters view. I think you need to realise that one mock projection, looking at possibilities if the QB’s are gone and considering I don’t do trades in the projection, is not my ‘view on how you build a team’. It’s not as simple as that, no way.