Senior Bowl day three & thoughts on Austin Hooper

January 23rd, 2020 | Written by Rob Staton

Today’s practise at the Senior Bowl has been moved indoors due to bad weather. The extremely limited coverage on the NFL Network could be non-existent today as a consequence.

For that reason I wanted to spend a bit more time discussing yesterday’s report from Tony Pauline regarding Austin Hooper:

“Austin Hooper is another soon-to-be free agent tight end who is expected to sign a big contract once the frenzy begins. Where could Hooper land?

“Speculation here in Mobile says the Arizona Cardinals, Green Bay Packers and Seattle Seahawks are teams expected to court Hooper. Don’t leave out the Washington Redskins, who may be ready to move on from Jordan Reed who has struggled with injuries.”

It’s not a surprise that the Seahawks are among the teams listed with apparent interest. They will add a tight end at some point during the off-season.

Will Dissly has suffered two serious injuries in just over a year. As talented as Dissly is, they’re in a position now of needing to find out whether he can stay healthy.

Ed Dickson will be cut, freeing up $3m in cap space. Jacob Hollister and Tyrone Swoopes are the only other tight ends on the roster. Hollister is a restricted free agent and Swoopes an exclusive rights free agent. They’d presumably have interest in bringing back Hollister — but not as TE1 or TE2.

Seattle’s offense felt the loss of Dissly. It’s in part why they went out and signed Josh Gordon. They need a safety net and a dynamic target, especially for key third downs.

There are options in the draft but it isn’t a strong class of tight end’s. We’ll need to see how the group measures and works out at the combine to get a full reading of the realistic options. However, this is a strong draft class for wide receiver’s and offensive linemen. It might be wise to try and address other needs (D-line, tight end) in free agency to max out the potential of the 2020 draft class.

The Seahawks have a history of making a splash at the tight end position. They made a bold move to sign Zach Miller to a big contract in 2011. They then traded a first round pick for Jimmy Graham in 2015. It wouldn’t be a surprise if they made another big move in free agency for someone like Austin Hooper.

So why is he a realistic target?

Firstly, let’s talk about the player. At the mid-way point of the 2019 season he was one of the few bright spots for the Falcons. As Oliver Hodgkinson notes, he was performing as one of the top tight end’s in the league by week six.

An injury and missing three games stalled some of his progress but he still finished the season with a strong stat line of 75 receptions, 787 yards, six touchdowns, 96 targets, 313 yards after the catch and 41 first downs in 2019. He only dropped one pass all season and averaged 60.5 yards per game.

He’s been a consistent reliable target throughout his time in Atlanta. You can often learn a lot from how fans feel about a player. Cory Woodroof wrote this piece for the Falcoholic, suggesting it would be a “colossal mistake” to lose Hooper in free agency.

The problem for Atlanta is cap space. They’re currently projected to have $7.5m available in 2020. Yet unlike the Jaguars (who can cut Marcell Dareus and create $20m immediately), there’s no obvious way to create room.

They’ve paid a lot of players but the structure of the contracts is hampering their flexibility. Matt Ryan, Julio Jones, Jake Matthews, Deion Jones, Grady Jarrett and Desmond Trufant are all on big money. Yet their middle class is also handsomely paid.

For example, Devonta Freeman’s cap hit in 2020 is $9.5m. Yet the structure of the deal means they’d have to eat $6m in dead salary to cut or trade him. There’s virtually no saving. James Carpenter’s cap hit in 2020 is $5.1m. The dead salary hit is $4.1m. If they cut Freeman and Carpenter they only save $4m and both players would need to be replaced.

There’s nothing wrong with trying to pump up the middle class of your roster — but you have to create contracts that enable you to move on when needs be.

The two big ways they can save money is to trade or cut top center Alex Mack ($8m saving) or cut/trade Keanu Neal ($6.4m saving). Again though — both players would need to be replaced and you’re talking about two players you’d rather keep.

They are stuck in a situation of having to make a judgement call on Hooper. They can’t really transition or franchise tag him because it would cost +$8m or +$10m respectively. So they have to decide is he so good that they can afford to lose a player like Mack or Neal in order to keep him?

I suspect they will move on. Throughout Matt Ryan’s career he’s done an excellent job with any tight end he’s been given to work with — whether it’s a Hall of Fame talent like Tony Gonzalez, Levine Toilolo, Jacob Tamme or Hooper. Considering they have Julio Jones and Calvin Ridley at receiver, they might feel like they can plug in a cheap replacement and succeed without needing to gut their roster.

ESPN’s Falcons reporter Vaughn McClure expects Hooper to leave Atlanta:

“The Falcons, with so much money tied up in top players such as Ryan, Julio Jones, Jarrett, and Deion Jones, will pass on signing Hooper to a lucrative extension and let him sign elsewhere. And Hooper will exceed $10 million per year with his new team. Meanwhile, the Falcons will see what they have in Jaeden Graham, who filled in nicely when Hooper was hurt this past season and is due to make $585,000 in 2020. The Falcons also will look hard at the draft class to find a potential pass-catching threat.”

So while the Los Angeles Chargers have the flexibility to tag Hunter Henry if they wish and keep him from reaching the market, the Falcons will likely allow Hooper to become a free agent.

As mentioned, the Seahawks have placed a high value on the tight end position. Hooper also fits what they look for. He’s a good blocker and a useful receiver. He’s well sized at 6-4 and 254lbs and can line-up in any formation. He has the length they crave (34 inch arms) and he has the agility they like.

The three cone and short shuttle appear to be important tests for the Seahawks and tight end’s. Here’s the evidence based on the player’s they’ve acquired in the Pete Carroll era:

Short shuttle times

Luke Willson — 4.29 at pro-day
Will Dissly — 4.40 (8th best in 2018)
Nick Vannett — 4.20 (2nd best in 2016)
Anthony McCoy — 4.57
Zach Miller — 4.42
Jimmy Graham — 4.45

Hooper ran a 4.32 short shuttle and a 7.00 three cone. Physically he ticks every box and he has the production, versatility and age to appeal as a big free agent target.

It won’t be a surprise if they’re willing to pay a salary towards the top-end of the market — around $10m a year. They will have a limit, of course, and Carroll may well be attempting a recruitment job on Hooper at the Pro-Bowl this week to aid any future negotiations.

It would be a competitive market though. The weak draft class at tight end and the likelihood of Hunter Henry not reaching free agency would make Hooper one of the star attractions. He’s only just turned 25, he blocks well and he’s a dynamic target as a receiver. He might not be Travis Kelce or George Kittle but he’d be in the next tier.

The Cardinals have $51m to spend in 2020 currently but have very little scope to create more. They should focus on rebuilding their offensive line but might feel the addition of a top tight end will do just as much for Kyler Murray’s development. The Packers have $29m to spend but can create $8m more by cutting Jimmy Graham. They could simply transfer Graham’s salary to Hooper.

Pauline noted the Redskins too. Ron Rivera knows the value of a good tight end. Greg Olsen was a huge part of his success in Carolina. Washington has $46m to spend and can easily create more. Cutting Josh Norman would save $12m, trading Trent Williams would save $12.5m, trading Ryan Kerrigan would save $11.6m and cutting Jordan Reed would save $8.5m.

If there’s a team who could really make a big pitch for Hooper — it’s Washington. Whether Rivera is capable of diluting some of the Redskins’ reputation for being a lousy organisation remains to be seen. They are in a strong position to be very aggressive in free agency though, especially as they start a new era.

The Seahawks are in a strong position too of course — with a healthy $69m in cap space projected overall and the ability to create more. They also have the offer of Russell Wilson and a much more positive organisational structure.

Yes — the big need is defensive line. It’s not the only need though. They have the cap flexibility to make multiple moves this year. This isn’t going to be a one or two player fix. Carroll is at the Pro-Bowl for a reason. He knows they need an injection of talent onto the roster and this is likely to be the busiest Seattle has been in a long time in terms of talent acquisition.

If they can add to their D-line and the tight end position before the draft, it’ll free them up to really tap into the strength of the 2020 class. They can get a receiver, some offensive line help and maybe add even more to the defense.

This doesn’t mean Hooper is the only option. Let’s see if a trade market emerges for players like O.J. Howard, David Njoku and maybe even Evan Engram. Howard and Engram would likely cost high picks however plus the inevitable large extension. The benefit with Hooper is you’re not paying out twice (draft + salary) and he has better production and consistency in the NFL.

Amid a likely influx of D-line additions, there is room for a tight end signing. Hooper is a strong option for the Seahawks and one to monitor.

Gregg Rosenthal posted a top-25 list of pending free agents recently. Hooper just missed the cut, along with Dante Fowler and Arik Armstead. All three could be strong options for Seattle.

Don’t forget to check out yesterday’s big review of days one and two at the Senior Bowl. Here are some notes from day two’s drills (video below).

North team

The first rep is a reasonable job by Colt McKivitz. He plays inside/out against Joshu Uche and forces him wide. As a tackle sometimes you’ve just got to make the pass rusher take the longest route to the quarterback and it’s up to the QB to get the ball out.

Neville Gallimore is held at bay on the second rep by Hakeem Adeniji. The two shared another rep later in the video and Adeniji won again. Then it’s the return of the Jason Stowbridge show. He just beats Nick Harris with a swipe to the left shoulder to create separation and then he uses his speed to burst into the backfield. Stowbridge has boosted his stock this week.

Then McKivitz handles Carter Coughlin of Minnesota with a nice punch and control. Darrion Daniels does well to leverage Jonah Jackson back into the pocket before Larrell Murchison beats Matt Hennessy with a nice spin move and whipped him again later in the video. Ben Bredeson’s first rep at 1:15 is reasonable. He could do with planting the anchor though because he cedes too much ground, even if the stays in front and in some control.

At 1:23 Josh Jones is blasted backwards by Alton Robinson. He does well to recover but when you’re driven deep into your own backfield on initial contact you’re clinging on by that point.

Hennessy’s second rep, this time against Davon Hamilton, is better. He keeps his feet moving and balanced and controls the block. Nick Harris struggles on the next rep and is driven backwards into the QB’s lap. Harris struggled in 1v1’s yesterday but looked a lot more comfortable during scrimmage.

Matt Peart’s hand placement is still wrong. He’s too wide and grabbing on the outside shoulder. He will be penalised for holding too often and can’t engage properly with this poor technique.

Charlie Heck has struggled this week and his battle against Joshua Uche was a cake-walk for the Michigan man. Uche set him up with the threat of a speed rush to the outside and Heck gave up the inside with no resistance. His footwork is poor and he doesn’t engage. It’s too easy.

On the final rep, Kenny Willekes beats McKivitz with a nice dip and bend.

South team

Logan Stenberg dominates Robert Windsor (as he has done all week) on the first rep. Stenberg just looks the part and would be a great fit at left or right guard.

Javon Kinlaw slips on the second rep but gathers himself and beats Lloyd Cushenberry on the next go-around. He limped back to the line though. Hopefully it’s nothing too serious.

John Simpson plants Josiah Coatney into the grand on the next rep. They run it again and it’s another win for Simpson, this time controlling Coatney comfortably.

Calvin Throckmorton has just arrived in Mobile after attending the Shrine Game and he gives up an easy inside-counter to Jonathan Greenard on his first rep. Then Jabari Zuniga takes a long path to the QB but still does a good job rounding Terence Steele. They replay the rep and this time Steele wins easily. Zuniga offers no counter and can’t disengage.

Logan Stenberg then demolishes Trevis Gipson. This is such a smart rep from Stenberg. He knows Gipson is light and will try to use his speed. So he anticipates contact. He locks on and uses Gipson’s own momentum to send him to the turf. This is so positive — knowing the situation, what kind of rush to expect, how to handle it and executing.

They then replay the rep and Gipson tries to run to the outside. Stenberg just stones him with power and control. If someone said Stenberg ended up sneaking into round one, I wouldn’t have an issue with it.

Cushenberry has a good rep against Benito Jones to follow before John Simpson loses the rematch with Josiah Coatney. Throckmorton’s second rep against DJ Wonnum is a lot better. He reads the outside rush and runs him out of the play. They give him a second rep and the same thing happens.

Alex Taylor does a good job handling Jonathan Greenard before Damien Lewis equally beats Jabari Zuniga. They replay the Lewis vs Zuniga match-up and Lewis dumps him on his backside. This was not a good look for Zuniga at all. TKO to Lewis. They give Zuniga a third rep and again Lewis handles him. What a beating.

Day three notes

Due to the poor weather in Mobile the practise took place indoors. That meant even more limited TV coverage today. Here are some brief notes.

Houston offensive tackle Josh Jones is a bit overrated. All week people have been hyping him up but his performance on the field hasn’t lived up to the chatter. Today, for the first time, he looked comfortable and talented.

That’s fine, of course. You want to see players reach a crescendo at the end of the week and take on coaching. The two reps below are much better examples of tackle play.

Nobody has done this to Jason Strowbridge this week until now:

For once, at last, someone locks on and connects with Strowbridge and handles him. Strowbridge lacks length and on tape his hand-usage was poor. He’s won with quickness all week but here Jones just gets his hands in the right the place, contains Strowbridge and when he tries to disengage desperately, he’s dumped on his arse.

The next rep was just as good:

Here he mirrors superbly. Strowbridge doesn’t even try to engage. He’s swiping at Jones before contact is even made. All Jones does is sit in position and wait for his moment to strike. Once he lands his hands on the frame it’s over. Textbook. Don’t get me wrong, it’s absolutely rubbish from Strowbridge and highlights a major flaw in his technique and tempers some of the hype he’s received this week. This is the reality with him. Poor hand use and short arms. Yet Jones took him on and showed well.

You need to see every rep though, because here’s Jones kicked into guard versus Neville Gallimore:

Jones isn’t a guard but still. The angles are different but he’s driven backwards fairly easily.

Gallimore has had good and bad moments this week. This is a good rep against Matt Hennessy (who also had good and bad moments):

He’s too quick and attacks the outside shoulder. Hennessy has to play defense and Gallimore has the position to do whatever he wants. Drive the blocker into the QB or try and disengage.

K.J. Hill had the nicest one-handed catch of the week:

Hill has excellent agility and quick feet and will run a superb short shuttle at the combine. The big questions with him are consistency and long speed.

I’ve not seen much of Denzel Mims working out because nobody’s seen much of practise outside of Mobile. However, he’s received rave reviews for his play. He’s a high-point, contested catch specialist:

You can now support Seahawks Draft Blog via Patreon by clicking the tab below.

Become a Patron!

206 Responses to “Senior Bowl day three & thoughts on Austin Hooper”

  1. drewdawg11 says:

    I’m sort of warming to the idea of stealing Armstead from the niners. He’s really blossomed the last two years after really being sort of “meh” for me. I can’t see them having the ability to re-sign him. Weaken a divisional opponent and strengthen your own roster is a no-brainer. Put him next to clowney and see what havoc they could bring to opposing offenses. 🙂

    • You wonder though, did he finally put it together or did he get that production because you have Nick Bosa next to you gobbling up attention. Either way we hope Armstead leaves Frisco to weaken them.

      • Trevor says:

        I think that was definitely part of it. I like Armstead but really hope they go for a speed rusher in the Avril mould instead.

        • One Bad Mata'afa says:

          Why not both?

          And Armstead on a line with Clowney, Reed (or similar), and Fowler (or similar) would be too much to allow him constant attention

    • Justin Mullikin says:

      I agree drewdawg11, I like my freak athletes and not many 6’7″ people can move like him. He looks to be able to play the base DE and move to DT in pash rush situations. We need someone like him, exciting offseason!

  2. Simo says:

    I could definitely get on board with acquiring Hooper, no question he improves the team. I’m just not sure if spending $10m+ of your available cap space on the position is the right move, especially when they need to invest heavily on the defense this offseason.

    Pick up Fowler and Armstead, and if you can still fit Hooper into the remaining budget then go for it! It’s going to take quite a bit to resign Clowney, Ifedi/Fant, Jefferson, maybe Kendricks and Reed as well.

    It will be interesting to see which direction they decide to go, but we all agree they need to be aggressive this offseason!

    • cha says:

      It doesn’t work that way Simo. You don’t get to sign free agents in the order that is convenient for you. As Rob mentioned he likely won’t sit on the market for long.

      We’re just talking about Hooper because of the report of the Hawks’ interest. I guarantee there will be plenty more rumors on the wire about the Hawks chasing defensive talent in FA. This is just the one that hit first.

      And yes they do have the room to sign him. If they signed him to say a 4 year $40m deal the first year hit would likely be something like $7-8m. Leaves plenty of room to fill out the defense.

      • Simo says:

        Cha, I’m only suggesting that acquiring a TE is not as high of a priority as fixing the defensive line. Sure, it would be great to add Hooper or Howard, but not if it costs them a chance at Armstead or Fowler.

        Maybe they can sign two quality (expensive) DL targets, add Hooper, and still resign all their key free agents, but it definitely starts to get very tight against the cap at that point. I also don’t want to see them go back to the years of little to no salary cap space (unless of course they are playing in super bowls).

        • Rob Staton says:

          They can budget what they can do in advance and set realistic limits to avoid having to do things in a certain order.

          • Simo says:

            I’m certain they’ll have a plan, and likely a good one.

            With so many of the belief the Hawks will be very active in free agency, I wonder how much the comp pick issue will factor into their free agent plan? Seems like it’s usually a fairly big consideration for John/Pete, they love it when they have multiple comp picks.

            • cha says:

              I agree but I think this is the year you say forget comp picks and go big. They have cap room and by signing players in FA you bolster your depth and elevate the team to a high level in 2020. They have a good chunk of young talent on rookie contracts on the roster already.

              • Simo says:

                I hope this is the approach, to some degree anyway. John and Pete will always try to find deals if they can (the next Bennett and Avrill signings), but they have also shown a willingness to swing for the fences at times. Maybe this is the time again?

                I do agree with Submanjoe that not much current money is tied to WR/TE, so maybe its time to splurge!

    • Submanjoe says:

      Hooper is definitely someone Seahawks should go after. Wilson needs weapons. Metcalf is cheap for 3 more years. The only real expense at receiver, te, and running back they have is Lockett. Spend some money on a receiver or TE please!

      • Jerad says:

        Maybe it’s time to play price is right with Atlanta. We had a good trade “template” with Houston on JC. Maybe we get Atlanta to franchise tag Hooper and then do a 3rd round draft pick for him.

  3. Arizona says:

    Kinlaw has pulled out of the senior bowl with tendinitis in one of his knees.

  4. Uncle Bob says:

    Sound analysis as usual Rob. Fans who’ve been extra restless in calling for Pete’s head the past couple weeks should take your extended Falcons commentary to heart. Perhaps it’s Super Bowl Appearance Syndrome. Seattle was in a similar position a few years back, Atlanta following their drubbing wishing to “maintain” momentum, is now there. And by appearances the Rams aren’t far behind over the next couple years if they don’t do some major adjusting (probably hindered by there competing desire to make a “big splash” in their new building). What looks even worse for LA is the near wholesale changes in coordinator/second & third tier coaches. Defections or house cleaning? Probably a bit of each, but it is strange that the special teams coordinator, arguably one of the top three in the league, took what on the surface looks like a lateral move. While I think the Seahawks could use some “tuning up” of the staff under Pete (those in charge of game/scheme planning have demonstrated considerable lack of ability given first half performances on a routine basis) it’s nowhere near the disfunction that appears around the league in lesser teams.

    My personal focus is on the trenches, both sides of the ball. I suspect JS will do a mix of FA and draft adds, hopefully the correct ones for the system. TE is part of that in my eyes for the sake of blocking, though the receiving part is critical as well.

    Let’s hope we have a Spring full of lively action including insights and debate. Lots of talent observations over the next couple months.

    • Mark Souza says:

      My personal focus is on the trenches, both sides of the ball.” – Absolutely, Bob. If you win that battle, you win the war. If you don’t, winning is very hard and inconsistent.

  5. Have you spent much time looking at Adam Trautman? Was reading up on him yesterday and he looks the part, at least catching wise. Hooper and Dissly would be a fantastic duo with Metcalf and Lockett mixed in there that could be a solid group.

  6. Mark Souza says:

    Stenberg – a man among boys. A real tone setter. Great call Rob. I would love to see him in blue and green.

  7. https://twitter.com/PFF_College/status/1220074814313914368?s=19

    https://twitter.com/PFF_College/status/1220378385836380160?s=19

    Uche could be perfect Sam/Leo.

    He is about Sam height and weight as Jacob Martin just with longer arms.

    If he runs fast 40y and 10y split I could see him as a Seahawks high pick (maybe even first round).

  8. LLLOGOSSS says:

    I’ve yet to click the link to the list, but it’s astounding to me that Fowler didn’t crack the top-25. He’s been very productive and is so young. Hooper has never gotten any respect, I think the sentiment has been it’s a function of the system he played in. I really have no idea. He’s always been fairly productive though, but last year was another level. Armstead certainly has the profile, I’m not up to date on his productivity, though.

    Fowler, Hooper, Armstead would be an amazing foray into free agency if you ask me. Add a rotational pass rusher as a compliment (perhaps Quinn?), and retain Clowney, and you’ve got a really viable DL again.

    • Dale Roberts says:

      As a group they would represent a $45 million/yr investment. Add Clowney and Reed and you’re at $80 million for five players. Wilson, Wagner, Diggs, Meyer, Wright, Brown, Lockett, and McDougald combine for $97 million. Add about $15 million for roster bonuses, signing the rookie class, a reserve. That’s $192 million out of a 2020 cap of $197 million leaving $5 million for the remaining appx 33 players… and we have no offensive line. I’m really glad it’s not my job to manage an NFL salary cap.

      • Simo says:

        No doubt it must be agonizing trying to make these salary cap decisions, but come on, wouldn’t it be fun to try to build a team.

        I’m sure John/Pete will make solid decisions though. They know where the team needs to improve, and they will try to be aggressive but also responsible as they look to improve it.

        • Dale Roberts says:

          I’m just pointing out that hitting the market for Armstead and Fowler would be problematic because I don’t think we can spend $80 million on the defensive line. Our Super Bowl run was fueled in no small part by getting Avril and Bennett on the cheap. I think if we’re going to get there again soon we’ll need to find some bargains of a similar nature.

          • EranUngar says:

            Our Superbowl run was fueled by having RW, Wags, K.J. and the whole LOB secondary For 10M combined.

            Now that is a deal that gets you to the SB.

  9. Henry Taylor says:

    The difference in narratives surrounding this offence with and without a reliable TE was Russ is the MVP and Pete should be fired. This is a huge need for the Seahawks and I’d fully support a splashy move like Hooper or OJ Howard.

  10. Ashish says:

    I’m so excited for this off season, Hooper looks ideal fit relatively low profile, young, good in blocking which is rear and must for hawks and good pass catcher. Plus we don’t need to give a draft pick, ticks all the box should not hesitant to pay little more if required as it full fill our need admirably. Also next we can move our resources on getting D-line build. Having Wilson and cap space should make JS life easy to get Hooper.

  11. cha says:

    Where is everyone on tendering Hollister?

    3 options with projected tender $ from overthecap

    first round – $4.6m
    second round – $3.2m
    original round – $2.1m

    Hollister being an UDFA, the Hawks get nothing if they tender him at Original Round and decide not to match any offer he gets.

    Feels like the Original Round tender is the obvious choice. Locks him as a 3rd TE for a reasonable rate and keeps him as a nice option again. But with the TE scarcity and the Hawks’ cap room I could see them upgrading to the Second Round tender to scare any suitors off.

    • Simo says:

      Original round tender IMO. Can’t see them paying $3.2m unless they would be paying him as the TE2 and not TE3.

      • Ashish says:

        Depends would you loose him for $1m or end up matching higher offer from some other team? Now he has some tape out there played well in the end. My having 2nd round tender high is $3.2 min.
        But looking at the past history, hawks will try to save even thousands let alone millon(s). JS will do his research and do well 🙂

      • cha says:

        I tend to agree. Original round makes the most sense.

        Another option is they could bring Luke Willson back for the veteran minimum and just not tender Hollister altogether. Or bring them both back and let them battle it out for the 3rd spot.

        • Personally I wouldnt want to give him any tender as they are all too high. If they really are going after Hooper you might not need him anyways. I would just let him go to free agency then look to sign him for $1 million or so. I would bet he doesnt get big offers.

          • cha says:

            We started the year with Vannett, Dickson and Dissly. If they can’t get their injury “luck” stabilized, I think they have to count on 3 full TEs getting significant playing time.

            It’s really hard to count on just 2 TEs even if they get Hooper. Dissly just hasn’t been able to stay healthy.

            And not to be discounted, the Hawks value continuity on offense. There might be value to keeping Hollister for his familiarity and his continued chemistry with RW.

        • Kyle says:

          And if Hollister is untendered, he can still come back. But can be resigned at any rate. For a third tight end I’m good with that risk.

  12. icb12 says:

    Cushenberry is what 6′ 3 or 4″ 315# ish… and dare I say, he looks a tad small in between Stenberg and Simpson. Lol.

    Stenberg looks so comfortable.

  13. Henry Taylor says:

    Kinlaw is done for the week, dealing with tendinitis in one of his knees.

  14. Volume12 says:

    Saw a mock draft with Seattle taking Florida CB CJ Henderson in the 1st round. Just…no.

    I get a lot of mock drafts are superfluous, but if these sites are gonna do one or claim to be a tapped in expert, do better. Know better.

    I don’t follow the Vikings, but I know they love them some CBs in round 1.

  15. I really hope they do go for Hooper. Paying a TE $9-$10 million a year gives you so much more value. Its like paying a WR $17-$18 mill a year.

    • Josh says:

      I have just normal cable tv on the west coast but I got to see a handful of falcons games. Hooper got skillz. He had a knee injury that derailed his production a bit this year but I am a fan of paying him top dollar. Hooper and Dissly would be a sick duo in 12 personnel if rehab goes well and uncle diss can stay on the field.

  16. Steve Nelsen says:

    Signing Austin Hooper makes so much sense. He adds another top-level skill position weapon for Wilson. He is at an age where his development is still growing and his best career years are in his future.

    He also upgrades the line blocking over our other TEs except Dissly. He takes all the pressure off of counting on Dissly to fully recover from last season’s injury. If Dissly fully recovers, having both Cooper and Dissly would open up some passing options 2 TE packages.

    He would be more expensive in terms of salary than some other options but would save us some draft picks.

    • Kyle says:

      Can you imagine a fully recovered Dissly and Hooper in 2 TE sets? With Metcalf and Lockett and a recovered Carson? That would be brutal to try to scheme against.

  17. Volume12 says:

    Teams only get 45 formal IV’s w/ prospects at the combine this year.

    Those and the VMAC visits (in the case of Seattle) are going to be waaaay more important this year. Not that last year’s VMAC visits weren’t. IIRC, Seattle drafted or signed as UDFAs, 8 or 9 of those visits from ’19.

  18. Volume12 says:

    There we go.

    Jeremy Chinn playing some CB.

  19. Matt says:

    Good stuff Rob. Really like the idea of Hooper, especially how young he is. Screams Zach Miller which is still one of the most underrated signings in the PC/JS era. A truly underrated cog in the Super Bowl run.

    Here’s what I think I’d like to see this offseason. I’m really trying to take the approach of how can we graduate the defense from below average to the 10-15 range, while also not neglecting the offense and building an even more lethal unit. Not sure if this is realistic, but here goes:

    1 Year Deal for Jarran Reed: He’s not getting a big contract from anybody.
    Clowney
    Fowler
    Hooper

    Restructure Britt. If he doesn’t agree, cut him unless Cap Space looks healthier than anticipated.

    Draft:
    R1 – WR Jalen Reagor: I have watched more and more of him…he’s better than Percy Harvin. Yep, I’m sticking my flag in the ground on that one. What really separates him from Harvin is that he high points the ball as good as anybody I’ve seen in recent years. May be small, but plays big and super fast. He will contribute big time to special teams and will add a dynamic to the WR corps and run game that is currently missing. Sending him on Jet Sweeps, lining up in the backfield…he is a mismatch that you have to account for. I could easily see DK and Lockett having 1000 yard seasons while Reagor has 600 yards receiving and 400 yards rushing. I think he is the piece that makes this unit borderline un-defendable. He is the one guy that realistically might be available and is a must have in my eyes.

    R2: CB Jaylon Johnson: Long, Fast, and ready to contribute on Day 1. We need to upgrade Flowers who now becomes a really good #3 (with experience) rather than a questionable #2.

    Britt not Cut

    R2: DT Ross Blacklock: Great athlete. High upside 3T that will allow PC/JS to be smarter about Jarran Reed in 2021. Like Reagor, he provides great insurance whilst also being able to contribute right away.

    Britt Cut

    R2: C Lloyd Cushenberry: A completely solid Center prospect that won’t be great but will probably be a league average player right away.

    R3: RB Clyde Edwards-Helaire. This team needs another RB to prepare for the future. This guy is a stud. Not sexy but I can see PC loving his tenacity and reliability.

    R4: OT Matt Peart: This is strictly a long term LT/RT play with a guy who has real ability but needs time. Ideally, we resign Fant who is the future LT and Peart slides over to RT in a few years.

    R5: WR/H-Back Chase Claypool: Here’s where this gets fun. I’m not a huge fan of Claypool the WR, but I really like the idea of him playing the role of Hunter Bryant/Jacob Hollister at a discount. He’s 229 lbs right now – you get him to 235 or 240 and all of a sudden you have a really fun RZ and 3rd down target. This isn’t about making him an inline TE. This is about adding a chess piece that could probably catch 35 balls a year that make a huge difference.

    R5: S Jeremy Chinn: Well built guy, might be able to play some CB. I think he just looks like a really moldable chess piece in the secondary.

    R6: DE Alex Highsmith: Project LEO prospect. Worth a flier.

    Here’s the draft summary: Reagor and Claypool provide very interesting chess pieces that I think can make this offense lethal. Reagor is insane. You want to help the run game? Make the opposing defense account for 3 dynamic WR targets and watch the power run game just explode. I think this pushes the Seahawks into Chiefs/Ravens territory. Edwards-Helaire can help lessen the Carson load and be the RB of the future.

    We grab 2 defenders who can contribute on Day 1. Blacklock can enhance the DL rotation while Johnson can upgrade the CB position. Combine those 2 with Clowney and Fowler additions and you are now looking at a unit that I think can get to the 8-10 range, with the upside to be better.

    We also plan for the future with some higher upside pieces that can be given the time to develop. I think Peart is really interesting long term. I think Chinn is EXTREMELY interesting long term, especially with PC’s track record. Highsmith is a gamble you take and if he only becomes an adequate situational pass rusher, not bad for the 6th round.

    Again – my goal with this is really about enhancing every aspect of this team. We all want the defense to be fixed, but the offense is so close to being lethal that I don’t want to short change that growth. FA is a chance to address Pass Rush with proven commodities. The draft is for targeting players/positions that we have had success with over the years. This team has about a 3-4 year window where RW can be at the top of his game. Once he hits 35, we will need to structure things a literally differently and maybe go back to needing a great defense.

    • Kingdome1976 says:

      Good post. My real concern though is Fowler. I still feel a little uneasy about him in some respects.

      • Matt says:

        I can understand that. I think Fowler’s personality will thrive in Seattle. And he won’t be expected to be the guy. He can feed off Clowney.

    • Trevor says:

      Really like alot of the ideas and the draft. I am with you 100% on Claypool as a TE vs WR. He is a huge kids that could play at 240-250, He is already bigger than Hollister, He is also really good in the red zone and using his body get separation. I comp him to Darren Waller from the Raiders. Really was hoping he would play some TE at the Senior Bowl.

      Fowler would be my #1 free agent choice of Chris Jones is tagged as expected. The Hawks desperately need speed off the edge similar to what Avril provided. He was never really replaced and the D was never the same.

      • Matt says:

        That’s the upside of Claypool, IMO. You hope to get a nice chess piece. You hit the power ball and he becomes Darren Waller. Either way, I think he is a very useful player, even if it is a unique/limited role.

        He could have 6-8 extremely impactful snaps a game. You don’t necessarily need or look to him to be on the field 50% of the time.

    • Simo says:

      I like it a lot, well done!

      If I was going to nitpick anything it would be that they may need to focus a bit heavier on the defensive side of the ball in FA and with their top 3 picks. It just seems like they are more than one key DL player away from having a better than average pass rush and run defense (two huge areas that need improvement).

      It would be great to add Hooper and Reagor to the offense, but they probably need more than just Fowler on the def line. Rookie defensive linemen just don’t seem to produce much on Pete’s defense, so hard to count much on Blacklock.

      • Matt says:

        I absolutely agree. The reason I didn’t avoided DL in R1 is that quite frankly, I think there will be significantly better value elsewhere. I really don’t want to see a repeat of the LJ Collier pick – who might turn into a player (still early), but it felt too forced. Collier, IMO, was never seen as a difference maker but rather a well-rounded 5T.

        I think there will be a playmaker, in some sense, available at 27. That might be a LBer who can really run (Murray or Queen). I’d be happy with either of those 2. I just want a player that opposing teams *potentially* have to account for with that pick. I’m not saying it’s an all-pro player in their rookie year, but rather someone who brings a dynamic element that forces opposing coaches to look and say, “if we don’t watch that guy, he could burn us.” An easier way to put it is getting speed with that first pick.

        I really think that’s critical for this team moving forward.

        Last note – they could also substitute Fowler for 2 “good” pass rushers. I think I’d actually prefer that route (ie Judon + another player). I think you are absolutely right that this would probably be better than just Fowler.

    • Dale Roberts says:

      Reed on a one year prove-it deal at $10 million would be good for the Hawks but I suspect someone will offer a 3 year, $13 mil/apy contract that Seattle will pass on.

      Center is a tough decision. I like the experienced, gritty Britt but I think our style needs a bigger, mauler type center to pair with our big guards.

      I agree on Reagor but if he tests well and interviews well he may not last and I think we can satisfy the position a little later.

      Right now I see Johnson slotted around the #58 pick and he’s moving up. I suspect he’ll end up going in the top 50. I also wonder if Pete/John will invest a second round pick on a CB.

      Is Cushenberry at 315 lbs the big, powerful center we need? Biadasz and Ruiz are just a few pounds heavier but they look bigger and seem to have more of a mauler mentality. That said if he was available with the 90th pick he’d be a steal.

      Ross Blacklock is a bit under the radar so nice catch. We don’t yet have an idea what his TEF score will be and he missed all of 2018 with an achilles injury so his combine testing will be really important. He’s also 22 years old which is likely why he came out regardless of the draft board’s recommendation that he return to school. I like the pick at this point in the draft.

      Clyde Edwards-Helaire would be a nice addition just due to his attitude however I don’t see drafting a running back when good answers can be found in the UFDA market. I think both Carson and Penny will return and be effective.

      Matt Peart is another good find but I don’t think he’ll be available this late. I look for him to go in the top 90 picks.

      You’ve unearthed an number of nice picks and this draft would make me happy which means that none of these players will be Seahawks. I’d like to see us move Fant to right tackle and replace his current position with a true TE like Jared Pinkney, Cheyenne O’Grady, or Albert Okwuegbunam who are bigger, block-first guys.

      Here’s my current happy place draft.

      Trade #27 pick to Indy for 44, 75, Indy picks Jason Eason.
      44 Raekwon Davis DT – Replace Reed, better against the run
      59 Brandon Aiyuk WR – Talented without the hype
      64 Jared Pinkney TE – Best blocking TE
      75 Cesar Ruiz C – This is where he’s currently rated but I suspect he’ll move up.
      98 Reggie Robinson CB – Our next great CB (FA comp pick)
      123 Logan Stenberg OL – Plug him in at left guard
      130 Trevon Hill Edge – Has the required bend. (FA comp pick)
      137 Myles Bryant CB – Future nickel star
      219 Drew Richmond OT – Former 5 star recruit lost his way at Tennessee, played final year at USC

      • Rob Staton says:

        “I like the experienced, gritty Britt but I think our style needs a bigger, mauler type center to pair with our big guards.”

        Britt is 6-6 and pushing 320lbs. I’ve stood next to him — he’s massive.

        Cesar Ruiz will not last to round three. No chance. Whoever rates him there should be ignored.

  20. cha says:

    Something just occurred to me with the free agent talk starting to ramp up.

    There is no CBA beyond 2020, but there is a pretty established line of thought that the next CBA will take into account all the new revenue streams from gambling. So the cap going forward should see a healthier increase than the usual $10m/year we’ve seen the last couple years.

    With that in mind, could we see some crazy contracts (well, crazier than even normal for FA) this year?

    When we all try to project contracts, we look at similar players and positions from the previous year, and there’s always a bit of an increase that we don’t look at. But this year it might be even more than we’re collectively thinking of with an unknown cap in year 2021 forward.

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      IMO I think we’re more likely to see more average players get overpaid than top players breaking the bank. Though I’m sure top players will continue to set new precedents.

    • Matt says:

      Great comment.

      I could very much see 25-27 year old Free Agents maybe even going to 1 year prove it route knowing they could get a major boost the following year. The nice thing is that I think this very idea allows us to retain Jarran Reed on a 1 year deal that is team friendly.

      • Matt says:

        *Obviously guys aren’t going to turn down top of the market deals this offseason. That’s too big of a risk (injury, performance, etc).

    • Steve Nelsen says:

      There are also some rules against extending cap hits beyond the duration of the CBA that could come into play with extensions. I think the likelihood of bigger cap increases after the CBA might incline a younger player coming off a down season (like Jarran Reed) to prefer a 1-year deal if they find that the market for a long-term deal is not as robust as they hoped.

      • cha says:

        Same thing for June 1 cuts too. There can’t be any June 1 cuts until a new CBA is in place, because they extend the cap hit into the next year. If there’s no “next year” on the books, that’s not a move that can be made within the bounds of the current CBA.

  21. Nick says:

    I really like Hooper. I’d be very happy if we brought him in. Though, personally, I’d prefer to draft Hunter Bryant and apply 10-15 million per year to an interior pass rusher, like Reed. I think TE is a position that is easier to develop than DT.

  22. Volume12 says:

    G Joe Thuney is a FA?

    LT- Duane Brown
    Rookie OT that can play both sides

    LG- Joe Thuney
    Jamarco Jones/Phil Haynes

    C- Nick Harris/Cesar Ruiz/Cushenberry/Hennessy
    Hunt or Pocic

    RG- DJ Fluker
    Phil Haynes/Jamarco Jones

    RT- George Fant
    ” “

  23. Volume12 says:

    IDK if his tape matches, but I like what I’ve seen from ND corner Troy Pride, jr. Will be interesting to see if his arm length hits the Hawks threshold at the combine.

    Like his story. He’s held his own against these bigger receivers. High effort. Very good footwork. Gonna run a lightning fast 40. Seen him run the route for a receiver a couple times.

    • Trevor says:

      Looks like he is ulra competitive and likes to battle, The limited tape I saw was hit an miss like alot of the CB in this draft class.

  24. Bigten says:

    My way to early outlook on FA and draft.

    We resign Clowney, 4 years 82 million. 40 guaranteed. Reed signs a one year prove it for 9 after having a down year and not getting much interest. We sign Armstead to a 3 year 36. Beasley to a 1 year prove it at 12. Hooper signs a 4 year 42. Carl Nassib 3 year 19 million. Not a great rusher, but very competent against the run. Would like another proven edge, just not many options for cheap. I’m not sure Armstead will agree to come to a rival, so maybe that could be used for someone like Fowler. I just see Fowler getting a hefty contract, having proved himself last year, and the draft having very few edge options (and last year having so many which could have been a factor in why there was limited interest).

    R1- Shenault. The perception is that he is a lock to go early, but With the depth of the WR class, and depth of lineman, I’m thinking that shenault and a few other top WR are going to end up lasting longer than projected. Teams could prefer other more traditional WR before him. And Teams are going to reach to get there guy in the other positions in order to not lose out on that position group. Similar to us taking Collier last year, we just couldn’t risk someone else taking the last of the DEs. Shenault is a Swiss Army knife. May not clearly fit our team or scheme, but Pete sees something special in his skill set that will complement Lockett and Metcalf.
    R2- Stenberg and Queen. Both of these players could end up propelling themselves into the late first- earlier second. Queen could be seen as a special talent, and teams needing to address the LB spot before the depth is gone. And you have mentioned Rob, Stengberg is a really special player. Nasty and tenacious. He could be working himself into the first. But as of right now, these two last to the end of the second and would be a perfect fit.
    R3- Winfield/Dobbins. Again, may be me just wishful thinking, but Winfield has the production, pedigree/blood lines, and personality to be good. Think he would make a great slot corner for us. I also think Dobbins May drop to here. He is behind Swift and Taylor, and I’m not sure many teams will be grabbing a RB early this year. But in the third, the value is just to great for someone I think fits perfect with PC. He is patient and shifty, not a run through your face like Carson, but not shy about it either. Has production, and just looks to be a competitor. RB of this talent have fallen this far before.
    R4- K.J. Hill/Donovan Peoples-Jones. Tapping into the WR class again, we grab Hill. Was a safety net in Columbus, who has the route running skills and quickness to be an asset for Russ. He isn’t going to have burners, and has smaller hands and arms. He is a little redundant to Ursua as a backup to TLock, so that could turn them to someone like DPJ. Peoples Jones was a former 5 start recruit, who never put it together in Ann Harbor. Poor QB play and poor coaching limited his growth and production. But he has all the talent to be special. Pete sees that and uses a fourth to grab him to replace Brown. I also like Duvernay, but I haven’t heard much praise during practices about him.
    R5-McFarland//Akers/trautman. This is more of a wish, I do believe he ends up lasting this long, but not sure Pete sees a way to use him, especially After grabbing Shenault in the first. If not him, I think they might see something in Cam Akers. Former 5 star recruit again, who just wasn’t used well in FSU. Has the idea size Pete likes. If we avoid RB or grab Dobbins in the third, we could grab a Te here. And though we grab Hooper in free agency, we sure up the position by grabbing Trautman. What I think will draw them to him is his willingness to block. Was quoted I believe saying he would rather put someone on there back than catch a pass. That’s going to be coveted.
    R6-Highsmith. The have been using later round picks to take guys with high production (Ursua, Jacob Martin) and highsmith was a highly productive smith on the edge, forging 12 sacks on the year. Adding to the potential blocks to help the DL.
    R7-Montez/Cole McDonald. Developmental guys, something about McDonald makes me feel they will take a chance.

    • Matt says:

      Question: which WRs did you have “available” in this scenario?

      Shenault is a lot like Nick Harris for me. Really love the player, just don’t think they fit in Seattle. Shenault needs a creative OC – reminds me a lot of Cordarrelle Patterson.

      Love everything else.

      • Bigten says:

        Reagor and Hamler are the notable ones. Both of which I think we could trade back and grab, which would also be nice to pick up another 3rd or 4th. Shenault is just something unique. Which like you said could be a good or bad thing. Patterson is a good comp, personally was thinking a little more wr version of Reggie Bush.

      • Eburgz says:

        The hawks traded for and signed Percy Harvin to a huge contract a couple years ago. Shenault’s skill set isn’t too different to Harvin. He’s kinda like Harvin with A+ character. It was a different Offense Coordinator (worse one I think) but it was still Pete and John’s team. I don’t think we would have any trouble scheming some touches for Shenault if he was on the team. Fly sweeps and wide receiver screens aren’t rocket science and they aren’t foreign concepts to this offense. He’s a raw route runner but he can catch the deep ball which is important in this system (Metcalf’s route running was criticized pre draft and we managed to make it work in our system)

        Viska is a dog. Think the hawks will like him. The question is the medicals and if he lasts into range.

        • Rob Staton says:

          Percy was a lot more sudden than Shenault

          • Kenny Sloth says:

            If you like him, he’s the type of player you take and dont look back

            • Rob Staton says:

              I just struggle to work out what his role would be in Seattle. Not a big time separator downfield or on the short stuff. Looks quick not electric. More shifty with the ball in hand. Think in some offense’s they could manufacture his carries but Seattle doesn’t really do that.

              • Kenny Sloth says:

                Not to be patronizing or anything, but you may be forgetting a tenet of PCJS scouting: Focus on what a guy can do not what he can’t. He’s a dynamic weapon that creates explosive plays, physical and productive when healthy. Just because he doesn’t fit our current offense doesn’t mean he cant be successful in it in the future. I made that mistake with Penny, and Viska is going to score high in the interviews.

                Like I said whoever likes him is going to really like him and I wouldnt be mad if it was Seattle*

                (*barring his testing numbers)

                • Rob Staton says:

                  It’s not that I’m focusing on what he can’t do, it’s simply about fit. Much in the way a really talented small cornerback wouldn’t fit. Shenault, to me, simply doesn’t look like a Seahawks player. He’s not a deep threat or really sudden on shorter or intermediate routes. He doesn’t really separate rather than he competes for the ball. He’s more explosive than fast. He needed manufactured touches at Colorado and will need the same at the next level. To me, that isn’t a Seahawks receiver.

                • Jhams says:

                  I think the Jimmy Graham experience shows that the whole “they focus on what he can do no what he can’t” cliche isn’t worth much. If you asked every head coach and coordinator if they ascribe to that philosophy they’d say they do. But it’s not that often it gets put into practice.

                  • Rob Staton says:

                    I don’t think it’s a worthless cliche. It’s not infallible though. Graham didn’t work out. But for the most part focusing on what a player can do rather than merely his limitations is probably for the best.

              • Kenny Sloth says:

                But I echo the concerns of your scouting notes, I just think if he tests well, he’ll have valuable traits for the range into which he falls.

  25. Trevor says:

    Hill looks so polished and his releases off the line look so crisp. Reminds me a little of ADB. What did Baldwin run for a 40 time?

    • Zxvo3 says:

      Baldwin ran a 4.47 but I like the comparison. Just wish Hill’s arms were a bit longer for a better catch radius

  26. Sea Mode says:

    Yup.

    WR James Proche to the New England Patriots?
    Keep this in the back of your mind: New England Patriots scouts were gushing over James Proche during today’s practice – I heard it firsthand. This doesn’t mean they are automatically drafting Proche, but he fits the bill for the type of receiver they love and have great success with.

    Tony Pauline
    @TonyPauline
    ·3h

    Continue to be impressed with James Proche of #SMU. Guy runs scissor sharp routes and defenders cannot stay with him.

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      Van Jefferson has been VERY impressive at Senior Bowl. Unbelievable crop of WR and IOL in this draft class!

  27. Sea Mode says:

    3:30, 5:38, 7:45… 🏃💨

    Jalen Reagor Career Highlights
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TOD1j_9ENE

    • Mark Souza says:

      Wow! Just wow. Amazing speed, great hands, great suddeness, great routes. He has great hops and timing to high point the ball. And he’s extremely dangerous and elusive after the catch or on returns. And he’s physical and will fight for the ball and fight to get defender’s hands off him.

      There was a serious drop off in QB talent at the beginning of 2020 that’s evident in the highlights. Many times Reagor had blown by the defender by 5 or more yards and a poor throw would turn it into a contested catch that Reagor would still make. Would love to see this guy in blue and green.

  28. Volume12 says:

    High praise.

    Jim Nagy said S. Illinois S/DB Jeremy Chinn reminds him of Kam Chancellor.

  29. Ashish says:

    Rob and Gang,

    Based on info so far, there are handful of WR and OL – G and C who are rated high. Hawks will pick 3 times from 27 to 64 which players you would love to have assuming we go WR and OL (G and C?

    • Rob Staton says:

      See my 12 prospects list from last week (but Bredeson sadly will be an adjustment)

    • Sea Mode says:

      Reagor/Aiyuk and Logan Stenberg/Cesar Ruiz. (I’m not so sure the best thing isn’t just to re-sign Britt though at C and spend the draft capital on an impact player somewhere else.)

      • Simo says:

        I would support bringing Britt back as well, provided these two conditions are met:

        1. He is willing to restructure his current contract, or willing to resign after being cut. Either way they need to lower his 2020 cap number.

        2. His knee checks out and he’s ready to go by the start of the season (or close to it).

        He’s a good center and anchor for the line, well experienced in the system, and should have a few more good years left in him. Spend the draft capital elsewhere, there’s plenty of other needs.

  30. Volume12 says:

    Won’t let me copy the link.

    The Jeremy Chinn vs Youngstown St. tape (2019) is excellent. Such a smart, disciplined player. Really rangy almost ‘bouncy,’ good ball skills, great open field tackler, versatile.

    He’s gonna need a zone defense IMO. Was also dealing with plantar fasciitis this year.

    Very appealing.

    • Trevor says:

      Physically Chinn looks exactly like the type of player Pete would love to developed. I would be really suprised if they are not taking a close look at him.

  31. charlietheunicorn says:

    I think the Seahawks believe they are set at LG/RG for 2020.
    That leaves the most obvious questions about the OL, RT and C.

    Resign Fant at RT and bring in Ruiz at center. You have continuity on the OL, mixed with youth and cost effective production along the OL. I can’t see them breaking the bank for a OG or C. Ifedi could be retained, but I’m leaning toward “nope”. That leave Fant as a cost effective option at RT. So that leave LG, which I think Haynes has the inside track to win the job (Iupati is a goner) and C, which needs some youth and depth. Hunt is quality guy, but just can’t hold up vs DT bullrushers…. and that leads me to Ruiz (or another top 2 round drafted center as a very viable option.

    I’m for drafting a TE and bringing in 1 FA TE, but I’m not sure they go to 10M for a guy. All I can say is, this should be a very intriguing offseason.

    • Gohawks5151 says:

      I agree with this. Haynes and Jones got experience at the end of the year and they still have Pocic and Simmons. The strength of the draft is on the inside O line though so I think they will take one. I agree that center is likely a Target with one of their first 3 picks. Keep Fant, sign a vet and take another developmental tackle

  32. BobbyK says:

    Part of the reason they’re interested in Hooper is the uncertainty with Dissly ever staying healthy. But if Dissly stayed healthy, they could have the best TE duo in the NFL with two guys who can “tilt the field” on any play with Lockett and DK. This next season could allow Russ the best receiving weapons he’s ever had if they get a guy like Hooper. I’m in on using $10 million in cap space for a TE who can both block and catch at a high level. Blocking TEs are so underrated to have and to have two guys who could do both at a high level would give the offense so much more flexibility than having guys like Hollister and Graham who really can’t block worth a lick.

  33. Dale Roberts says:

    Rob do you thing Britt’s play reflects his size? Do you think of him as a mauler? Could you please compare Britt to Biadasz and Ruiz?

  34. Austin Hooper would be a good splash signing but the more Seahawks value signing could be Eric Ebron. He had a good year two years ago with Andrew Luck and a not so good year this season with Brissett. He will only be 27 this year and I could really see him as a target if Hooper doesnt work out.

    • Ashish says:

      Can he (Ebron) block?

    • cha says:

      Ebron is pretty well known as a terrible run-blocker, and only useful in the passing game. So anytime he enters the game, he signals the intent to the defense. Add in his drops and I’m not sure he’s a great use of resources.

      That’s what made Zach Miller so great. You never knew how he was going to be deployed. Great blocker with sticky hands was always a useful weapon.

      A guy like Ebron is a return to Jimmy Graham. This talented guy who doesn’t quite fit the offense and gets fans stirred up why he isn’t being thrown to more.

      I’d take him as a second wave FA signing for a very reasonable amount if the Hawks don’t get Hooper or someone like Bryant in the draft.

      • AndrewP says:

        Definitely intrigued by KJ Hill. Curious what you mean Rob by ‘long speed’; is the 40+ yard endurance speed? Something that can be measured simply via 40 time?

        Definitely want to read more on Hill in case the likes of Reagor, Aiyuk and Hamler are gone, or if they trade #1 for DL help.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Enron not a Seattle style TE plus he’s so meh aside from that one season. Huge disappointment.

      • Kenny Sloth says:

        Huge disappointment, but a decent plan B. If he finds a cold market I wouldnt mind a one/two year prove it deal. Could be a solid role player for a couple years

      • cha says:

        Enron not a Seattle style TE plus he’s so meh aside from that one season.

        The Seahawks would be unwise to INVEST in him. His STOCK is going down.

        Enron.

      • dcd2 says:

        Enron is a nice nickname.

        Cost a lot, dropped what they were supposed to hold onto and then couldn’t block it from causing damage.

  35. cha says:

    So we did Hollister as an RFA, what about David Moore?

    3 options with projected tender $ from overthecap
    first round – $4.6m
    second round – $3.2m
    original round – $2.1m

    Moore is a 7th round pick, so if they decide on the Original Round tender AND he gets an offer they decide not to match, the Hawks would recoup a 7th round pick in return.

    To me this one seems like the Original Round tender is the obvious choice. The Hawks talked Moore up quite a bit in training camp this year, saying he could now play any WR position now and had looked poised to really contribute before he broke his arm. Another year of occasionally flashing great ability sandwiched around periods of invisibility.

    I think the Hawks hang on to him as a safety blanket to keep the continuity on the offense. His potential and his familiarity in the offense make him worth investing the $2m in. Yes this is a great WR draft class and yes they have Ursua hopefully coming online next season. But you’ve got to give RW all the weapons he needs to be successful and 2020 could be the year Moore finally breaks out. Plus Moore taking punts this year in Lockett’s place signals a level of trust PC has in him.

    What does everyone else think?

  36. Volume12 says:

    I saw a little blurb on Denzel Mims in Rob’s coverage here.

    Really like this IV. Especially the last 10 sec. here. He’s a grown a** man that seems to be a high character as well.

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1220161924903641089

  37. Volume12 says:

    Jeremy Chinn is Steve Atwater’s nephew?!?

  38. Volume12 says:

    There’s no chance the Bengals consider Justin Herbert at no. 1 now. Is there?

    • DC says:

      Are they the Bungles or the Bengals?

      • Aaron says:

        Definitely the Bungles

      • JimQ says:

        Perhaps The Bengals could be trade partners with Seattle, they have the #1 pick and MAY want to get back into the 1-st round (for WR-Jefferson to pair with their new QB?) and are willing to give up their picks at #33 & #97? 680 vs: 692 points on the trade chart. Drop 6 spots & get a late 3-rd rounder would seem like a pretty good deal for the Seahawks, (even if they had to throw a later Rd. 2021 pick in – to make it happen.)

        Also, in spite of the focus on Seniors this week, we shouldn’t forget about some of the prominent Juniors that are in the draft this year, some future Seahawks may be found there. One example, I’m still waiting to hear more about DT(5-tech)-James Lynch ’cause I think he’d make a great addition to the Seahawks DL and he appears to be slotted currently as a middle of round 2 pick, but no noise about him at all is to me somewhat disturbing. Hopefully the combine will fill in enough good information to vault some of these Junior guys up on the list of potential Seahawk options.

      • Volume12 says:

        I do too. I could see there being some internal debate in their FO/coaching staff now that they got to work with Justin Herbert and have seen him up close and personal.

        • Rob Staton says:

          I doubt it to be honest. Burrow just had possibly the greatest season by a QB ever. Not sure being up close to Herbert changes that. But I do think other teams might put him above Tua having seen him.

    • Matt says:

      Anybody considering Herbert over Burrow based on a week of Senior Bowl practices needs to lose their job. Herbert has never had an issue with looking incredible on single read plays. He’s very impressive.

      His problem is he can’t go through progressions and is terrible when plays go off script. I’m convinced that you need to be Lamar Jackson athletic to survive as a QB in the NFL if you are not going to be able to go through a progression and throw guys open and perform when things go wrong.

      Burrow has shown he is able to handle everything. Easily…and I don’t say that lightly, easily the greatest season by a college QB against insane competition. And he has shown he can play on and off script at an elite level. You can’t “unsee” how rare his processing speed is. Tua has a lot of that as well. Love, Herbert, and Eason? Low processing speeds.

      • Volume12 says:

        I’m in agreement. However, I ain’t gonna poo poo the idea of it. If I look stupid as s*** for bringing it up, so be it. And it’s not about a week of practice. Rather, they’ve gotten to go through a process with Herbert. That’s unlike anything they’ll be afforded to do w/ Burrows.

        There’s a possibility. Not that anyone is, but speaking in certainties when it comes to NFL FO’s is ludicrous. If we wanna do that, I’ll make a promise that some teams will like Herbert over Burrows. And Burrows having 1 of the best seasons ever doesn’t guarantee him success at the next level.

        • Rokas says:

          To be honest, how can we promise anything, when we will not be able to find out?
          If some team which drafts Herbert will say, they liked him even more than Burrow, can we believe that, knowing that they did not have a shot at Burrow?
          If we draft Marlon Davidson and say we preferred it to Kinlaw who was long go, can it be credible?
          I am all in for outside the box thinking, but some good week by Herbert does not make an insurmountable distance to Burrow vanish.
          Now if we know, that Bengals are offered some ridiculous compensation for No. 1 pick like 4 rounders, from Miami, there is a point of debate, who is more valuable Herbert + 3 first rounders our Burrow. But even then, we can’t say that Bengals liked Herbert more.

        • Rob Staton says:

          I don’t think it’s stupid to bring it up but I don’t think there’s a cat in hell’s chance of it happening.

          Burrow is just too good. To me it’s like passing on Andrew Luck simply because you spent a week with another guy who everyone knew was physically top notch. Burrow is also clearly pissed off for greatness and from Ohio. So there’s absolutely no way, not any at all, that they go with Herbert instead.

          However, I wouldn’t be surprised if other teams present move Herbert above Tua.

  39. Volume12 says:

    Curious to see if Seattle makes a splash in the 1st wave of FA in regards to upgrading their pass rush or, as they typically do, get a couple guys in that 2nd wave.

    If it’s the latter, a guy who I think fits their scheme perfectly and is an ascending player, DE Stephen Weatherley.

    6’5, 260-265 lbs., almost 35″ arms, 1.59 10 yd., and he’s been coached by Andre Patterson. One of the 5 best or so positon coaches.

    • Nick says:

      Vol—love the addition of Weatherley. Every time I watch a Vikings game he seems to pop. Would be a great bargain buy.

  40. Coleslaw says:

    If we got Arik Armstead what would that mean for Jarran Reed? I’d love to have Armstead but idk if I’d rather have him over Reed for the $.

    But if we kept both and added a guy like Everson Griffen, with Shaquem Griffin looking like a legit player, I’d be happy with that. Maybe another 3rd wave speed rusher.

  41. Simo says:

    Armstead likely takes Reed’s place if they decide to go that route, just don’t see them both on the same line. And I’m not sure how much of an upgrade that really is, as its hard to fully evaluate Reed’s 2019 season. Still think there’s a chance to keep Reed on a bargain deal (maybe a 1 yr to build back some value), so that might be the best use of available funds, especially if allows them a run at Fowler, Dupree or Barrett.

    • All I see is 12s says:

      I think most would prefer to keep reed, but if we can’t, wouldn’t Suh be the natural replacement? Probably cheaper and probably a better player too. He’s the guy we get if were all in for this season

  42. Sea Mode says:

    Nice. Personally, I put a good bit of stock into this kind of player feedback:

    Jim Nagy
    @JimNagy_SB
    ·7h

    2020 @seniorbowl South Squad Offensive Practice Players of the Week (voted on by the position group they competed against in practice)

    QB: Jalen Hurts, Oklahoma
    RB: La’Mical Perine, Florida
    WR: Van Jefferson, Florida
    TE: Jared Pinkney, Vanderbilt
    OL: Lloyd Cushenberry, LSU

    North Squad Offensive Practice Players of the Week (voted on by the position group they competed against in practice)

    QB: Jordan Love, Utah St.
    RB: Joshua Kelley, UCLA
    WR: K.J. Hill, Ohio St.
    TE: Brycen Hopkins, Purdue
    OL: Josh Jones, Houston

    North Squad Defensive Practice Players of the Week (voted on by the position group they competed against in practice)

    DL: Davon Hamilton, Ohio State
    LB: Francis Bernard, Utah
    DB: Jalen Elliott, Notre Dame
    ST: Tyler Bass, Georgia Southern

    South Squad Defensive Practice Players of the Week (voted on by position group they competed against in practice)

    DL: Javon Kinlaw, South Carolina
    LB: Akeem Davis-Gaither, App. State
    DB: Dane Jackson, Pittsburgh
    ST: Blake Ferguson, LSU

    🚨Oregon QB Justin Herbert named 2020 @seniorbowl Practice Player-of-the-Week.

  43. dcd2 says:

    If we plan to keep Britt, and Ruiz was there with our pick, does it make sense to take him still? Ruiz could be a rotational G and backup C, with the thought of taking over in ’21.

    I keep thinking about Billy Price last year and how he might have been better served in a role like that.

    Or do we think that is poor use of a high pick (a player we know won’t likely be a starter in year one)?

    Basically, does planning to keep Britt rule out Ruiz (or another C)?

    • Sea Mode says:

      I’d say unless he falls significantly for some reason, then yeah, that’s not the best use if we are keeping Britt around, especially with the prime talent available at WR near the end of R1.

    • cha says:

      It’s a good rule of thumb that you not count on starter-level contribution from your first round picks in year one. Particularly if you’re not drafting in the top 5.

  44. DC says:

    Sea Mode, did you ever check out Stephen Sullivan, TE, LSU for your TE master list?

    Height: 6-5″
    Weight: 254
    Arm: 35 1/8″
    Hand: 10 3/8″

    Notes from Tony P. during the week:

    “For someone rarely used in the offense employed by the national champion LSU Tigers, Sullivan acquitted himself well on Tuesday. He’s a good athlete with enough speed to split the seam and get downfield. Sullivan also caught the ball reasonably well.”

    “Sullivan looked terrific all day and was the most impressive tight end on the South. He was dominant as a blocker and made a lot of big plays catching the ball. He oozes with athleticism and shows speed down the field and strength at the point.”

    “Thursday was another solid day for Sullivan, who showed a lot of athleticism and looks like a natural pass catcher.”

    Another one to monitor if he wasn’t on the list already.

    • Trevor says:

      He is definitely a guy to keep an eye on at the combine etc. Could be a real sleeper with ideal size.

    • Sea Mode says:

      Good shout. He was way down on the bottom of my list, but I never got to him. Was listed at 6-5, 242, so definitely a pleasant surprise to see he has the real TE size. Definitely a potential Senior Bowl diamond in the rough.

  45. DC says:

    Darney Holmes, DB, UCLA doesn’t fit the Hawks’ profile at the position but would make a very good slot corner imho.

  46. Rob Staton says:

    New podcast recorded, should be out tomorrow.

  47. Ashish says:

    Brandan and you sounds good. You should do regular podcasts this offseasons

  48. Bigten says:

    Reported that colts are going to be aggressive after Clowney. And they have the most cap space. Concerning to me.

    • BobbyK says:

      Unfortunately, I can see this happening. Money usually wins. That QB position is pretty pathetic though.

    • icb12 says:

      The Colts don’t strike me as a “contender”.

      We’ll see how true Clowney remains to his “contender” statement or if he just wants to chase the biggest payday possible.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Not sure why you’d be worried. Clowney says he wants to play for a contender. Did the Colts look like a contender to you last year?

      The fact is non of the potential contenders have anything like Seattle’s cap room. If the Seahawks want Clowney and if he’s serious about playing for a contender and not just any old team for the money — he will be back. Guaranteed. Plus Seattle has Duane Brown working the phones.

  49. Jesse Williams says:

    Rob, I’d love to hear your thoughts on ESPN’s Mock drafts, especially the lack of Jalen Reagor. Why do you think that is?

    • Rob Staton says:

      There was a report via the superb Tony Pauline recently saying teams were concerned that Reagor was a one-trick pony, capable of running downfield but not much else. My concern would be that the league keeps making mistakes eg Terry McLaurin a year ago. Reagor is a superb talent. I hope he falls to the Seahawks at #64 just like D.K. Metcalf.

      • Von says:

        I spent some time looking at Reagor’s tape today. He’s very sudden, obviously fast, but something else stood out to me. Not only does he play bigger than his size, he has a knack for not giving the defender an idea when the ball is arriving. He just reaches/goes up for the ball at the perfect time. It’s like a center fielder that gets a good jump on a ball in the gap. He knows from the start that he can get there with his speed, and just glides to the finish. All in!

  50. […] could be in the form of an established tight end such as Austin Hooper (discussed in more detail here). It could just as easily be another veteran […]