The Russell Wilson no-news headlines begin

February 3rd, 2019 | Written by Rob Staton

When we talk about a Russell Wilson contract saga and make reference to how frustrating it will be, there are many reasons for that.

At some point in the next six months Wilson’s agent Mark Rodgers will make an appearance on the radio. You’ll hear rumours and conjecture. Both sides will be striving for any leverage they can get.

And you’ll get ‘updates’ like this…

The word ‘still’ is important here. Russell Wilson and the Seahawks still haven’t talked about a new deal.

The headline presents this as a problem. They haven’t talked. Yet realistically, why would they?

It’d actually be a surprise if they had started talking.

As we discussed last week — the eventual negotiating barometers are clear.

Russell Wilson and his team can use the franchise tag to ask for $110m fully guaranteed from 2020-2022. Why? Because if they’re willing to do what Kirk Cousins did and collect franchise tags, Wilson will receive guaranteed salaries of $30.34m, $36.41m and $43m for the three seasons.

There’s simply no pressure for Wilson to ‘secure’ his long term future. He’s incredibly rich. The Seahawks are highly unlikely to just let him walk if he picks up one injury. Even if they did, he’d be able to name his price to any prospective employer on the open market. There is no scenario where Wilson does not get a ton of cash.

So he can say, not unfairly, give me $110m guaranteed or something similar. And the Seahawks would be unwilling to accept that as a proposition. So Wilson’s team are unlikely to propose it and the Seahawks are unlikely to initiate talks knowing what the response will be.

This is business. And it takes time. Knowing when to make the first move, gaining leverage, biding your time. It’s a slow process that takes a while. Just look at 2015. A formality of a new deal with Wilson ended up taking months.

Here’s the reality of the situation. It wouldn’t be a big surprise if talks didn’t happen at all until after the draft. By that point the Seahawks have done free agency and potentially even drafted a quarterback. That would be a preferable time to open talks. They can explain to Wilson their full financial situation. By then they might have an idea on Frank Clark’s future — plus Jarran Reed and Bobby Wagner. They’ll have a lot more information at their disposal and may even be able to challenge Wilson with the addition of a new QB on the roster.

How badly do you want to be here long term because we’re willing to draft others?’

By saying that it doesn’t mean they intend to move on from Wilson. It’s a bargaining position. The type you need to gain any kind of foothold in talks.

If no deal is forthcoming before training camp — the 2020 franchise tag amount of $30.34m is not an issue. The only problem will be if they can’t negotiate new deals with Clark, Wagner and Reed before the end of 2019 and risk losing one of those players due to the limit of one franchise tag per team.

Essentially there’s no rush here. It’s going to take a long time. We’re going to see plenty more articles like this. ‘Still haven’t talked’ will be a phrase you read a lot. Then it’ll be ‘haven’t made any ground’. Then it could be ‘Seattle considering their options’. Then it might be ‘Seahawks draft quarterback’.

It’s going to be a saga. It’ll be a battle of business. And it could go either way.

Unfortunately you’re going to get a lot of non-information about a situation that isn’t that complex to understand or work out. It’s simply a difficult deal to do and it’ll take time to conclude.

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141 Responses to “The Russell Wilson no-news headlines begin”

  1. Volume12 says:

    5 years ago today.

    Y’all remember this feeling?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/NFLUK/status/959433941169123328

    • Sea Mode says:

      Of course. The craziest thing was that it was so unnecessary already by that point. Icing on the cake that was about all we got in return for many millions.

      But I remember explaining to a friend before the SB about how nobody was as fast as this guy we had traded for, and then Percy went and did that. What a weapon, really too bad how the rest went down.

  2. Ceasar says:

    I agree with your overall point. Russell Wilson will get paid. The only question is will it be the Seahawks. The Seahawks hope so.

    The best position for Seahawks to assume is to try and improve the team as much as possible. Not resigning Russell makes that even more important. I am sure Russell will evaluate the chances that this team has to compete for a SB but I do not think that is the only criteria for his signing. Guaranteed money and market are in the mix too.

    I am doubtful that JS/PC can build a top three defense in the next few years but they have the possibility of building a top three offense to compete in the playoffs. If they can also build a top 7 or 8 defense, it may be enough to put another ring on Russell’s finger. Doing so without LOB or Marshawn would elevate Russell’s QB status league wide.

    • Dale Roberts says:

      What makes you doubt PC/JC can build another top three scoring defense? They were 13th in 2018, the first year of a major rebuild both in players and coaches and with rookies and sophomores littering the starting line up. Who saw Tre Flowers, Shaquille Griffin, and Poona Ford emerging so quickly? Add an offense designed to eat up time of possession and I’d say based on their track record they have a better shot than most. I don’t see the evidence for why you’d bet against it.

    • Jeff M. says:

      We have all the ingredients for a top 3 offense but unfortunately we’ve put those ingredients in the hands of a chef who can’t even boil water…

      Fun example of what statisticians refer to as Simpson’s Paradox: we’re better both rushing *and* passing than either the Falcons or the Steelers but worse than both overall.

  3. SwissHawk says:

    I know it’s our newsworthy franchise QB that we’re talking about, and the resulting clickbait opportunities, but in reality I think the potential range of outcomes for Russ’s deal could be quite small. The franchise tag route gives Russ a max of $110m over 3yrs but with no security beyond 1 year. Money has a time value and while a longer contract gives Russ security, this can be matched with an insurance policy – I’m not sure on the exact numbers but the two must be worth $3m-$4m per year combined. That brings the contract ceiling down to c$33m per year fully guaranteed.

    Rodgers market leading deal is $134m/4yrs with $100m total guarantees, with Matt Ryan at $150m/5yr with $100m total guarantees – so the floor should be somewhere in between these two.

    Lots of numbers but this suggests we’ll end up with a 3year deal of $31m-$33m per year with a high level of guarantees (80%+) unless I’m missing something?

    • Rob Staton says:

      There is no security problem.

      Even if he got injured, the Seahawks wouldn’t a.) just let him become a free agent and b.) even if they did he’d be able to name his price to any interested party.

      Franchise QB’s don’t hit the market. Even one who’d missed an entire season with a neck injury who was older than Wilson is now got to name his price (Peyton).

      ‘Security’ is no leverage for Seattle.

      • RealRhino2 says:

        Don’t take offense, but I think you are underselling the value of security. Of course it’s leverage. There is no way you’d be willing to pay up front the whole three years of a guy’s max possible payout when you could pay in installments and keep an out for yourself in case of injury or poor performance.

        That doesn’t even get into the fact that counting that third option year is pointless, because we’d never pay it. Throwing it in there is a red herring that inflates the total number. If Russ’s agent says “You should pay close to $110 over three years because that’s what we’d make under the tag for those three years” you’d shut him down pretty quickly: “Look, Mark, we both know we are talking about $66 million over two and we’re never going to get to Year 3 on the tag, so let’s start over.”

        You’re operating as if significant (i.e., career-ending or significantly career-threatening) injury isn’t possible, as if the only kind of injury he could suffer would be a hamstring pull or something.

        I like Russ okay, but I’m okay with him walking. Peyton Manning won the SB playing like crap, Toim Brady just won one playing mediocre, Nick Foles won, etc.

        • Rob Staton says:

          1. I am not underselling security. If anyone really thinks that is a factor, I’m afraid you’re wrong. Franchise quarterbacks don’t hit the market. Even if Wilson receives a serious neck injury and misses a full season — as a free agent he’d still get to name his price. Peyton Manning did and he was older than Wilson. If he receives an ACL, an achilles, a broken leg — none of these things are going to stop a perennially crappy team saying — ‘We have a chance to sign Russell Wilson’ and just going for it. There is no scenario — none at all — where Wilson doesn’t get paid. Tag, re-signing, becoming a free agent. Fact.

          2. It’s not a red herring at all to include the third tag. That has to be included. Because it’s what he’s due. And while the first two tags are affordable that is the cut off point. It’s when a deal is done or he leaves. So of course Wilson would include it in his opening gambit. It’s a fact that he will do.

          3. The last paragraph about letting him walk is staggering.

          • bigten says:

            I have to kind of agree about the security being factor. Otherwise, no QB would sign a deal and just force the franchise tag, over and over, sign a one year somewhere else, and force again, in a cycle. Im not saying it is obviously a HUGE factor, but it is a bargaining chip the seahawks can and will use. To your point about even if he suffers a major injury, still being able to name his price, i would like to humbly disagree. Russel isn’t a Luck or Manning, he isn’t a prototypical pocket passer, he is undersized and mobile. His best asset is the magic he can make outside the pocket with his feet, scrambling. He has never been a sit in the pocket and throw. And when he does have to do that, he isn’t in the top 5 for QBs. So i believe that if he were to get a major injury, lower body injury, that limited his ability to scramble and roll and create magic with his feet, his stock would be extremely hit, and he would not be in the position to “name his price”. Also, take for instance, Alex Smith’s injury this year, he might not even be able to play again, so career ending injuries for QBs happen. Now, the question is, is he in a position financially to be able to take that kind of gamble? I believe he is, and will reset the market. He has money, his wife has money, so he can risk the “security” for a bigger deal. But, i don’t think he will be able to use the 3rd tag as much as its being assumed. In that mind set, then he could also use the 4th year tag at like 50 mil as a tool. Its just not realistic in my opinion. And sure he can say it, and will maybe, but that doesn’t mean it is going to be a factor that persuades the hawks, they can easily say they won’t pay the 3rd tag, and that chip is used and gone. But, I don’t believe he will be asking, honestly asking, 40mil/yr. He is smart, and knows how much that would hamper his team. I also don’t think he is worth that, to the seahawks, or anyone else. But thats just my opinion.

            • Rob Staton says:

              Kirk Cousins has changed the game forever. We’ve not had enough time for that situation to play out long enough for people to realize this yet. Now, it doesn’t mean EVERY quarterback is going to play on the tag. Some, like Aaron Rodgers, will be happy to be paid the highest amount in the league and will accept that. Others will go the tag route because it’s an opportunity to earn mega, mega money and then still reach free agency. Kirk Cousins has guaranteed himself $140m within the space of three years using the cap. Wilson, from the same draft class, has guaranteed himself $65m in his entire career.

              Do people really think that hasn’t been noticed?

              And again, if Wilson gets injured it won’t matter. The Seahawks won’t just get rid after one injury. And even if they did, Wilson would be able to name his price on the open market.

              His future earnings are 100% secure.

        • Simo says:

          Wow, I can’t envision a single scenario where the Hawks just let RW walk, certainly not without exhausting every option to keep him. Russ would have to be dead set on going somewhere else, leaving Pete and John no option.

          I also can’t believe you’d be okay with Russ walking as a Hawks fan! Football has never/rarely been this exciting or good in Seattle, with a large part of that success because of RW.

          Rob is probably right in stating that this contract negotiation won’t be simple, but it should be! A four year deal with a slightly higher AAV and guarantee than Rodgers should get a deal done!! Russ feels well respected and even becomes the highest paid QB in the league, if only for a short while.

          Bottom line is that we can’t/shouldn’t walk away from our franchise QB, while he is still capable of several years of outstanding play. Last night’s (less than) Super Bowl gave us a great example. The experienced franchise QB led his team to victory, even if he didn’t play great. The much less experienced QB looked overwhelmed, unsteady, and scared all night long.

          • Rob Staton says:

            I’d go a step further than it won’t be simple. It’ll be migraine-inducing.

            I wish it was as simple as just give him a little bit more than Aaron Rodgers. But the tag and Kirk Cousins has messed up the system. As I’ve quoted a few times, Wilson can make $110m guaranteed by collecting tags between 2020-2022. So the motivation for him to agree a non-fully guaranteed contract worth, say, $34m a year isn’t there. Not yet anyway. He might get to that point in August. Or in 12 months. Or after two tags. But right now he’ll only cost himself money agreeing to a deal.

            And he can look at Cousins earning $140m guaranteed in a four year window and see his own $65m career earnings and think — this guy was in my draft class.

            The Seahawks will not walk away from Wilson unless they’re forced to. Even then it’d be a franchise and trade not a release. They will be desperate to get a deal done — just not any old deal. And both parties are going to be working and working to get the deal that is right for them. These things take a long time as we saw in 2015. It could take 1-2 years to get a deal done. And that’s what you prepare by considering drafting a QB early which is what JS has been doing already for two years.

            I think Wilson and Seahawks will find common ground. But I also think it will be a long, drawn out process and that the Seahawks, in the meantime, will prepare for a future without RW while they work to make sure that doesn’t happen.

            • Ross says:

              Honest question here and I would not say this about everybody, because I’m all for players getting as much as they can: Through my Seahawks/NFL fan optics, RW seems like the kind of player who would see the value in taking less than max dollars in order to help the team acquire/retain playmakers. It’d be his 3rd contract, so it’s not like he’s coming off a paltry rookie deal – he’s been getting paid. Without mentioning that he’s married to a successful musician, doesn’t this seem like the perfect storm for a player realizing the positive implications of taking less money for the good of the team? I know Tom Brady is a bad word everywhere but in New England, but his consistent team-friendly contract terms despite GOAT status is never talked about but deserves a lot of recognition.

              All that said, I would never fault RW for negotiating for as much as possible. He deserves it.

              • Rob Staton says:

                It’s impossible to say how RW would approach this but no — I don’t think he’ll do what Brady did. I have no idea why Brady even did what Brady did. I think the Patriots had his pants down personally. I guess the evil empire even have a way to manipulate their legendary QB.

                Wilson, IMO, will go for what he’s owed and can realistically expect. He clearly has plans way beyond football. I suspect he wants elite wealth. I don’t think he’ll be in a mood to take what’s there just to get a deal done. If he wouldn’t do it in 2015 he won’t do it now.

                • JohnH says:

                  The Pats funnel tons of money to Brady under the table via the “TB12” store in their glorified strip mall of a stadium.

                  And honestly, when you’re worth hundreds of millions (over a billion now?) as a couple and your wife rakes in over $100,000,000 a year, “taking a pay cut” is a bit different.

                • Ross says:

                  I, personally, don’t know what it’s like to have that kind of money, but perhaps when you’ve been making as much as Brady has for that many years, and have a wife that makes at least double what he makes, championships are perhaps more meaningful than money. If that’s true, taking a discount (if you trust the GM to use the money correctly) makes a ton of sense.

                  Anyways, I have hope. Not a lot, but I do. I don’t think this is the same situation as it was in 2015 when he was coming off a rookie contract. I think RW wants rings. If he wants to go down as one of the best of all time, rings are more important than anything else, fairly or not. Look at the last 10 super bowls – none of the winning QBs had a huge cap hit except for Peyton Manning in SB50 – and that was “only” 19MM. It’s fairly obvious that while good QB play is necessity to win in this league, once you back the money truck up to their house, your chances for a SB win decline.

                  If going down as one of the greats is important to RW, then he should look seriously at how his contract affects the team.

                  • Rob Staton says:

                    You’ve got to remember this though — unless you’re expecting Wilson to take $25m a year — him getting $32m or $36m a year isn’t making a jot of difference to ‘help the team’. This is the problem with this angle. What is $4m getting you? What if he took $30m? Is $4-6m a year the difference between Championships and not? Probably not.

                    It’s why I think expectations of discounts to ‘compete’ are rabbit holes. Wilson’s next deal or franchise tag will be massive. The only question is — how massive?

                    And I’ll say again, this is his peak earning contract. He never gets to be in this position again. Maybe when he’s 35 and looking at a fourth contract he’ll be willing to cede a little to be competitive. Not now. Now is his only chance to cash in.

              • Simo says:

                Its a good question you raise, and not sure how Rob would respond, but my sense is that despite his reputation as good guy and team player, and the fact RW has made significant coin during his second contract, and his wife’s considerable income, Russ’ desire will be to maximize his earnings this time around. Successful, well known players like Russ always seem to have big dreams after football and big dreams require big money!!

                I do wonder if its ever presented to them in contract negotiations though. “Hey Russ, if you agree to this slightly reduced, team friendly contract, we will be able to use the extra money to resign Fluker and Sweezy, or we agree to add such and such WR!!” And who knows if it has any impact on the actual negotiations?

                I suspect very little of these other issues have any real impact on Russ’ negotiations when it comes time to get a deal done. He likely wants to earn as much as possible, and be paid what he’s worth. As a player he most likely also supports Bobby, KJ, Frank, Fluker, and Sweezy getting handsomely paid. It’s not his problem to figure out how all that fits in the salary cap!

                • Rob Staton says:

                  One thing to remember here — this is likely to be Wilson’s most lucrative contract. It’s possible, aged 35, he receives another big deal. But it’s no guarantee. This is his one big opportunity to cash in.

                  If he were likely to be willing to do a ‘team friendly’ deal it’d be aged 35 chasing some more titles before the end. This time around, he knows very clearly that if he doesn’t get mega money now he’ll have missed his peak earning window. And the $60m in guarantees he received in 2015 is nothing compared to the $140m Kirk Cousins has earned on two franchise tags and then hitting the open market.

  4. Volume12 says:

    Hate changing the subject, but it’s disgusting to think about Seattle potentially taking a QB as anything more than a backup from this class.

    Texas A&M DL Kingsley Keke can flat out play. That’s a dude right there.

    Great length, can really tighten corners for a big guy, textbook bull rush, has a repretoire of rush moves. Gonna be a coveted day 3 guy.

    Kingsley Keke vs NC St. (2018):
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PF0mKKs32og

    • Rob Staton says:

      I don’t see it as disgusting at all to draft someone who you believe you can develop over the course of 2-3 years. And while it’s far from a good class of QB’s there are 2-3 guys who provide a skill set to work with.

    • DC says:

      Losing Russ = losing your job as GM/HC/VPOFO or whatever title you have, sooner or later that is assured.

      A better negotiating tactic than drafting some shmuck backup to “pressure” him would be to insure his protection and adding a good weapon or two that makes his job easier. It’s ‘goodfaith’ negotiating by setting him up for long term success. Considering our current famine in draft picks I will be pretty pissed if our top 2019 pick is a qb.

      There’s nothing I can do about it so if i’m losing sleep it will be from something else. I don’t have a problem with Russ holding the ‘highest paid player’ in the league title for the 12 months or less that he would have it. He’s the most important player this city has ever had in any sport.

      • Rob Staton says:

        It’s possible to add a development QB and weapons.

        We need to remember this.

        They don’t pick once in the draft.

      • Volume12 says:

        I wouldn’t either.

        I’m all for them taking a QB as a backup, but taking one in the 1st-early 2nd with this group and odds are your gonna be looking for another one very soon.

        • Rob Staton says:

          This is the wrong way to look at this.

          1. You don’t draft a QB purely to be a backup. It’s one of the reasons they’ve only drafted two.

          2. It’s very acceptable to draft a QB who you believe requires some coaching and refinement. And it[s very possible for QB’s to develop given time.

          3. It doesn’t matter if it doesn’t work out. The idea here isn’t to draft the ideal QB to be the ideal insurance. The idea is — you NEED to start planning now otherwise you’ll get caught out. If you wait for the perfect QB you’ll end up like the Cardinals. They need to start trying to develop a possible heir apparent just in case. And whatever anyone thinks about this QB class there ARE 2-3 players at least with some promise and a reason to believe they can be developed.

          I fear for the fan base if/when they draft a QB early this year. I hope people ‘get it’. Because it should be ‘got’.

          • Volume12 says:

            The reason they’ve only drafted 2 is because RW is so rare and you don’t/can’t change the structure of your offense for a backup. Finding a guy with a similar skill set ain’t easy.

            Doesn’t have to be perfect, but they ain’t gonna just plug anyone in there.

            • Rob Staton says:

              Having Wilson from 2012 has definitely had an impact on not drafting another QB until 2018. It’s not the only reason though. Schneider has said on multiple occasions they didn’t intend it to be this way. You don’t draft a backup QB. You draft players you believe you can develop into more. It hasn’t worked out for them so far where they’ve been able to add but that will change now.

              They don’t need to find a player with a similar skillset. Neither do they need to ‘just plug anyone in there’. It’s about identifying a player they believe they can develop to be a potential starter in a year or two because they might be needed. And there are players in this draft that fit that bill. This isn’t a great QB class because of the options at the top of round one. Not because of the developmental options outside of the top-10.

              • Simo says:

                Interesting discussion about QB’s going on here; draft a QB this year or not? Use a high pick or wait until the mid to late rounds?

                How come no discussion about continuing to develop the guy who was on our team last year as the backup? Why does a draft pick have a better chance to replace Russ than Brett Hundley?

                I can’t imagine Hundley is going to be expensive to resign, so why not get him under contract for the next three years and try to develop him? He’s only 26 years old. At least it wouldn’t cost us a draft pick in a year we have so few.

    • WALL UP says:

      It would seem that if the QB class is not the best this year, and there are a limited amount of draft picks, with definite needs at multiple positions (DE, DT, WR, LB, DB, TE), it just may be prudent to wait until next year when there are more picks and perhaps a greater QB class.

      Russ is not going anywhere. For now, it may be best to build around the franchise QB with the talent of this draft, on the defense, and continue to build on the running game.

      • Rob Staton says:

        They may not draft a QB early this year.

        But in no scenario is it prudent to push this into next year.

        People need to be prepared for the situation that is coming. I don’t think some of you truly recognise it.

        • WALL UP says:

          Drafting late, would only result in what they did last year. A competitive QB would have to go early, 1-4. Those resources may be available next year, not this year. They have too many holes to fill despite what positive Pete says.

          The available defensive components are there to round out the defense, Go For It! This is too strong of a defensive class to pass on, for a backup QB

          • Rob Staton says:

            You’re not alone in this but you’re getting too hung up on the idea that one pick spent (wisely) on a developmental quarterback somehow prevents the Seahawks from doing anything to help other areas of the team.

            I’m already sensing a really unenjoyable summer if the Seahawks do indeed take a QB early. Because a lot of fans are not going to understand the thought process and the necessary planning that is needed. They’re going to be caught up on ‘why didn’t they draft this big name defensive player I wanted!’ instead of recognising the situation.

            The Seahawks are going to be able to add defensive quality in this draft even if they spend their first or second pick on a QB. It’s that type of class. It’s not either/or at QB or defense. And they might take a defensive player with their first pick. But it could be a QB. It really could.

            • C-Dog says:

              Who was the most impactful rookie Seahawks defender in 2018? Was it Rasheem Green that was touted as an absolute steel in R3? Nope. It was a college safety that was drafted in R5 that converted to their starting RCB.

              Who was their second most impactful rookie defender? Was it Rasheem Green that many thought before the draft might sneak into R1? Nope. It a undrafted undersized defensive tackle from Texas.

              Did they use their first pick on a starter in 2017? Nope. They used a first round pick on a backup running back in 2017.

              Does that mean that the said backup running back won’t eventually become a starter? Nope. Not at all.

              If Seattle trades back and drafts Will Grier or Daniel Jones, it no where means that they won’t find other players that will make on impact right away. I think it just means that they will take a player of some need at the point of the draft that it makes sense to take him because he likely won’t be available later, and with a draft as deep as it is on the defensive side, they can find their other guys later, if this is in fact the direction that they are going to go.

              Seattle could look at this class and say “Okay, there is no Wentz here, but this guy could be a bit like Cousins or Carr. We can work with that guy.”

              • Wall Up says:

                I’m glad you mentioned that. This has been their staple in finding gems in later Rds, in order to build and tweak their formidable defense. They will do that again this year. But, picking up a Clark, a Reed, Wagner or Thomas caliber type player, in addition to those late Rd finds, is at their disposal, from this years draft.

                Rob was correct in wanting to plan ahead. Last offseason they started that process by moving on from significant players on their defense. We all know that Pete’s philosophy is to run the ball and have a great defense. They did achieve one aspect by being the #1 running team, while drafting Penny in a deep running back class, even though his contributions are yet in the future. But, there defense is not to Pete’s liking.

                They have a chance this year refurbish the defense to Pete’s liking, with the addition of (4) core players on defense. And as we witnessed today, having a good QB, and a good defense, does win championships. It’s hard to imagine JS & PC not looking at replenishing their defense with the talent in this year’s draft.

                As I mentioned in an earlier comment session, pass rush does not always have to come from the edges. As we witnessed today, pushing the pocket up the middle is essential in moving the QB off his spot. Saunders will help in doing this, and perhaps another UDFA gem will be there as well. But, to miss out on a Wren, or Hanks, who could be BWag’s new security blanket, with the lose of KJ, for a future QB, appears one draft too early.

                They have their franchise QB. Russ is not going anywhere, despite future negotiations, or the lack thereof. They are (4) core players away from being a dominant defense again. They can achieve that from this year’s draft.

                2. (40) Hanks LB or Wren DT
                3. (74) Saunders DT
                3. (85) Bryant or Collier DE
                4.(109) Mr. Williams WR
                4.(124) Peters CB
                5.(144) Edoga RT
                5.(148) Autry LG
                6.(195) Ingold FB

                All of these picks could become starters, if not now, the a year or two. With these players, in addition to the usual few UDFAs, and FA they acquires, this just may be the added impetus they need to get to where Russ has been prompting this entire off season, the SB. For this off season, the goal should be, to fill in those missing pieces that enables them to do so. JS can load his chamber next year, when it is more favorable.

                • Rob Staton says:

                  1. Spending one pick on a quarterback does not prevent you from adding defensive talent in the draft. You yourself have them spending three of their next four picks after the first selection on defense.

                  2. Are we seriously considering Terrill Hanks or Renell Wren to be so good that the prospect of spending that pick on an investment in the future at QB to be such an issue? I think that’s a very poor example to illustrate your point. It’s not like you have them taking Christian Wilkins after all. Or even Montez Sweat. God forbid we miss out on a linebacker nobody knew about until the Senior Bowl or a highly erratic and inconsistent, albeit athletic, defensive lineman.

                  3. You can keep saying ‘Russell isn’t going anywhere’ as many times as you like. And it may be true that he indeed signs an extension. I think that is more likely than not. But it doesn’t change the situation at all that the Seahawks are facing. There are certainly no guarantees. There is a very real prospect that they part ways. That’s why good teams plan ahead. The Seahawks are a good team and will plan ahead.

                • Wall Up says:

                  If Grier were available in 5th Rd, then I could see JS filling his chamber. I would not risk losing Hanks, or Wren.

                  It would send the wrong message in the locker room to have your 1st pick a QB. These guys are hungry! They want to win right now! I think Clark, Reed, Wagner and Russ can sense how close they are, and would be willing to sacrifice for the better good to help make things happen. They just need more KEY players on defense, and keep running the ball.

                  • Rob Staton says:

                    No, it won’t send the wrong message to the locker room at all. ‘Sending a message to the locker room’ is not a concern. Being left without an answer at QB is.

                    No, Will Grier won’t last to R5. And no, the Seahawks are not only going to consider a QB on day three.

                    And no, Hanks or Wren are still not good examples to illustrate your point.

                  • Wall Up says:

                    That’s the same thing said about Bwag when he was the 47th pick in the 2nd Rd. Don’t sell Terrill too lightly. I can’t wait to see his results from the combine.

                    Wren was playing out of position @ NT 3-4 front facing constant double teams, because he was the strongest player on their team. His natural position is 3T and 5T. He was best suited for A or B gap penetrations rather than filling up a 2 gap NT position. Pete would place him in the best place for him to succeed, and fully utilize his unique skills of speed and power.

                    Unfortunately, I think both will be drafted in that mid 40 range and can only get one.

                    I see that you are fully vested in taking a QB of the future this year, and not next year, which is where they may have more flexibility. I get that. What’s wrong with waiting just one more year, when they have the luxury use a 2nd Rd pick on a QB?

                    A lot people thought they should have taken Andy Dalton in the 2nd Rd in 2011, rather than sticking with Tarvaris Jackson. But, JS was planning ahead for Russell, the following year.

                    If he chooses to select a QB with their 1st pick, I will be surprised, but understand that’ll be part of his plan. But, he hasn’t adequately refilled those Pro Bowl positions that they’ve chosen to moved on from. Building that this year may be a greater priority than the next QB. We shall see.

                    So, I respectfully agree to disagree with you on this Rob. We can revisit this after the draft.

                    I was surprised that they selected Ifedi, although the jury is still out on his outcome, and his feet. Hopefully, it will be a good outcome in whomever they do select, and Ifedi learns a few dance 💃 steps. 😊

                  • Rob Staton says:

                    I projected Wagner as a R1 pick in my mocks. It wasn’t the same as Hanks having a good Senior Bowl.

                    I am not fully invested in taking a QB of the future. I am projecting a scenario that is a distinct possibility. This isn’t a preference of mine. It’s a review of the situation.

                    I think rather than respectfully disagreeing you should simply accept what I’m suggesting is plausible and say you’d rather them do something else.

                  • WALL UP says:

                    Hey! I’m sorry you took it that way. I thought that is what I was stating by mentioning Ifedi. With JS & Pete, anything is possible when it comes to the draft. Like I said, “If he chooses to select a QB with their 1st pick, I will be surprised, but understand that’ll be part of his plan.” That’s stating that it is possible to happen.

                    You’re very astute in presenting so many variables to consider. That’s why so many of us are enthralled with this blog. We couldn’t do without your work Rob!

                    I hope their preference, for now, is to build a formidable, top 5, in the run & pass defense, and continue being the #1 running team in the NFL. Running the ball and playing great defense does win championships. Also, throwing in a freakish big threat like Mr. Williams, occasionally, won’t hurt one bit.

                    I just couldn’t resist mentioning that possibility Rob.

                    But seriously, thanks for your tireless work that you’re doing. You’re the best!

                  • Whit21 says:

                    Im with Rob.. Does anybody remember who the seahawks signed before drafting Russell Wilson? Matt Flynn was signed and started camp at the QB1..it wasnt until his arm showed that he couldnt do QB1 reps and RW got those reps and impressed them enough to go with him in preseason. Matt Flynn could have been impressive and pro bowl worthy and had a 3rd round pick sitting on bench. Flynn didnt work out and RW took the job..

                    Anybody that says theres no way you can let him go or JS will get fired if he doesnt resign him is waaaaay too much a RW fan and doesn’t understand how important the salary cap is.

                    Thats the narrative with the Patriots winning the SuperBowl. They had to pro bowlers and 1 all pro.. stephon gilmore.. Tom Brady is never near the top of the list for money made.. hes at the top for SB rings. If Russell wants to be at the top of the money made list.. then there needs to be a backup option.

                    Im pretty confident that with a complete team, they could still be very competitive with another option at QB, like a WIll Grier. RW is not the end all be all.

  5. Aaron says:

    We’re also a combine and draft away from the constant non articles, speculation taken as fact, and lists, lists, and more lists of top 10 or 5 of everything. This includes the totally trendy and makes no difference NFL top 100 players. The title of Adam Schefter’s article made me think it was actual news for a second, so I posted it in the previous comment thread. Then I actually read it and it’s really just fluff and no news. Thank you Rob for being one of the few sports sources I go to that not only calls out this “journalism” but brings real concrete and substantive information to the table.

  6. RWIII says:

    In regards to the long-term deals of Frank Clark, Bobby Wagner and Jarran Reed. I hope John Schneider & Co. signs these players to team friendly long-term deals.

    However, let’s just take a look at what Bill Belichick is doing in New England. After the 2015 season Belichick traded Chandler Jones to Arizona for a 1st round draft. After the 2016 season Belichick traded Jaime Collins to the Cleveland Browns for a first round draft pick. After the 2017 season Belichick traded Brandin Cooks to the Rams for a first round pick. Jones and Collins were two of their top defensive players. Brandin Cook was the top wide receiver for Brady during the 2017 season. Despite trading away these KEY players the Patriots have not MISSED a beat.

    By trading these key players this enables the Patriots to stay out of salary cap hell. This gives Bill Belicheck flexibility. These gives Belichick the flexibility to snag free agents whenever he want to. It also enables the Patriots stay younger. Younger players tend to stay healthy longer than older players.

    Belichick knows how to think “outside the box.”

    • Rob Staton says:

      Belichick can do this because he is the best coach in NFL history competing with the best QB in NFL history. That’s why they win, not because they made a rather bonehead move to practically give away one of the best pass rushers in the NFL to Arizona.

      Let’s put it this way. If Seattle trades away Frank Clarke for a late R2 this off-season, nobody will approve of that and the Seahawks will likely be severely impacted by it.

      • RWIII says:

        Rob: So trading away Chandler Jones was a bone head trade. Maybe! The Patriots have played in three straight Super Bowls since they traded Jones away. By the way who said anything about trading away Frank Clark?

        The Arizona Cardenals record since they traded for Jones is 18-29-1. The year before the Cardinals traded for Jones they went to the N F.C Championship.

        • Rob Staton says:

          There’s no maybe about it. A late second rounder for Chandler Jones was not a good trade for the Patriots.

          I didn’t suggest you’d said they would trade Clark. I said that if the Seahawks pulled a move like the Jones trade with Clark, everyone would say it was dumb.

          The problem with your argument RWIII is as simple as this — the Pats have Brady and Belichick. Nobody else does. There’s no copying the Pats. They’re the best because of their coach and QB.

          • RWIII says:

            Rob: The Patroits had four sacks in the Super Bowl. Looks like they really missed Chandler.

            • Rob Staton says:

              FYI — Snarky comments like this are not cool on here.

              You’re also completely missing the point, which is frustrating given it’s so easy to get the point. Trading Chandler Jones for a late second rounder was not a good move by the Pats. Fact. Nobody can dispute that. Just because the Pats are good doesn’t mean we have to re-write their mistakes as success stories.

            • JohnH says:

              The Percy Harvin trade was objectively terrible. The fact we won a SB afterwards doesn’t mean it was a good idea.

    • Dale Roberts says:

      I absolutely agree with you about Belichick’s ability to adjust and innovate. Replicating his personnel decision making process may not yield the same benefit for lesser coaches/systems. The deals that Belichick avoids are the second, “sentimental” contracts for “team leaders” or players who are really good but don’t represent a weekly advantage (field tilters). Clark and Reed are entering their prime. Wagner is still young and a $12 million a year would be a relative bargain for what he means to this defense. I think these are deals that need to be made. It’s the next contract that you have to worry about.

    • DC says:

      It’s spilt milk but in Seattle’s case those players would have been Sherman & Thomas. There was smoke but no fire. BB certainly has an incredible sense on when to ‘sell high’.

      To trade Clark or Reed entering their primes as seemingly real pros with essentially no one to replace them doesn’t strike me as the way to build a champ.

      • Whit21 says:

        you could say BB won the first 3 SBs on Bill Parcell’s personnel more that his own. He hasn’t made huge picks in the draft. Cliff Avril and jason puck had a good interview with rob ninkovich during SB week where he explained why patriots culture was good for him because it was less fun and more about the work.. Blue collar type of environment. Just like PC wants certain guys for his system, its more about size, athleticism, passion.. In the end you just need guys that will do their job, which is very import in Belicheck’s system.. Offense and defense.

        PC system just allows for a little more star power to develop. where as BB would rather get draft picks and less money on the cap to 1 pass rusher. He can get a lot out of scheming against a particular offense than having stars on the D Line or other areas of the team.

  7. smitty1547 says:

    I’m going on the record now and saying after watching The Murray interview with Dan Patrick, should he fall. The Hawks will take a hard pass. John/Pete like guys with a passion and commitment for football. This guy just does not show it.

    • Rob Staton says:

      You can’t make that judgement based on one 90 second snippet of one interview.

      Perspective people. Perspective.

      • smitty1547 says:

        Have we ever seen 90 seconds of Wilson looking like that EVER? Even when he was young? I’m not saying he won’t be good, I’m not saying he won’t get drafted in the first round or even first overall. I just think he became a hard pass for us.

        • Rob Staton says:

          We haven’t seen Jared Goff act remotely like Russell either and he’s playing in the SB today.

          If you’re going to judge him on that I think that’s incredibly unfair. I won’t be judging him on that. No way at all.

    • cha says:

      I dearly hope NFL teams have that view too.

      Too small, no passion, divided between baseball and football.

      Let him drop to the Hawks. Yes please.

  8. smitty1547 says:

    RW111, I’m right with you there, I love all 3 of these guys, however I like healthy hungry and cap flexibility more. The Belichick way works for me, especially since i have confidence in are group to work the draft for the right guys.

  9. AndrewP says:

    Rob- Semi OT, but it has to do with finances, so…

    I asked Chad Forbes on Twitter if he thought Barr would be a second wave guy, and he scoffed, saying Anthony Barr would be a top-10 FA and would therefore go quickly. How much stock do you put into a Chad Forbes prediction?

    • Rob Staton says:

      He could easily be right.

      I suspect he possibly felt the same way about Bennett & Avril in 2013 though. So we’ll see.

      • AndrewP says:

        I guess it was a question to the community, too… ‘How connected is Chad Forbes?’

        I don’t follow nearly as closely as others, do, I honestly don’t know how much to take his word as gospel.

  10. RWIII says:

    One point I forgot to mention is the fact that whenever Belichick signs a player long-term it is almost always team- friendly and below market value.

    • Rob Staton says:

      He’s also Bill Belichick.

      You can’t copy the Pats. They’re unique. Loads of teams have tried to be them and it never works.

    • lil'stink says:

      It’s not so much about team friendly, below market contracts. It’s about finding guys on the proverbial scrap heap and then coaching them up to play a key role. Brown and Van Noy are perfect examples.

  11. All I see is 12s says:

    Rob, I really appreciate your article and your perspective on the subject. I’ve been reading a number of the articles relating to the subject and the more I think about it the more I think you’re onto something. Personally, I think it is a great advantage for the next three years, if the Seahawks choose to go the franchise route. we can have Wilson at an affordable rate.I mean, three years is a long time. Who knows what could happen in three years. We already saw our hawks go from Peak LOB to a bruding aging team in 3 years. Why not have Wilson essentially on a three-year contract with a team option every year? Seems like Seattle has total advantage in this scenario and Wilson would be happy because he’s getting paid.
    I think it would be one of the fun drafts of all fun drafts If they found a way to draft Murray while still trading down.
    I understand that it would be nice to add on to the team for this coming year especially on defense, but it will be even nicer couple years down the road to trade an emerging quarterback to a team for a wealth of pics or if worst-case and scenario happens, they move on from Wilson for for even greater cache of pics. I didn’t like what you were saying at first about drafting a quarterback early in this draft, but now I’m with you Rob. I think it makes total sense for the long range success of the Seahawks.

    • Rob Staton says:

      The other thing that helps here — the DL depth in this draft. If a guy like L.J. Collier or Khalen Saunders really is available in R3, I’m not worrying too much about needing to go DL with the first pick.

  12. jdk says:

    Am I mistaken or doesn’t getting a deal done this offseason allow Seattle more flexibility in stretching the new money over more years and likely lowering the APY?

    I would think both parties would feel a sense of urgency to get something done this offseason because it gives Seattle more cap flexibility to build a better roster around their best player.

    • Rob Staton says:

      There’s no urgency for Wilson to get anything done this off-season.

      • jdk says:

        Hypothesize that Wilson does eventually extend with Seattle for x dollars.

        If he does it this year, the team has far more flexibility for structuring his deal and lowering the APY.

        Your contention is that Wilson wouldn’t care one way or another about making it easier to build a roster?

        • Rob Staton says:

          Aaron Rodgers’ cap hits per year on his new deal:

          2020 — $32.6m
          2021 — $33.5m
          2022 — $37m
          2023 — $25.5m

          There’s no ability to gain any meaningful saving on APY by getting a deal done. A new deal for Wilson would pay him at least this per year. Currently on the tag he’d be taking up cap hits of $30.34m in 2020 and $36.41m in 2021. By that point he either has a long term deal or he’s leaving Seattle because a $43m hit in 2022 is unlikely.

          My contention isn’t that Wilson doesn’t care about making it easier to build a roster. My contention is it doesn’t make any difference whether he’s extended or tagged. There’s no saving.

  13. Volume12 says:

    Terry McLaurin is gonna be a better, much better, receiving version of Matthew Slater.

  14. Donovan says:

    Partway thru 2nd qtr – where is Gurley? He’s gotta behiding an injury. Otherwise this is just bizarre.

  15. Volume12 says:

    This game is trash, boring AF, and going exactly the way the Pats want it too.

  16. Volume12 says:

    Outkast!!!

    Thank god. Something entertaining.

  17. All I see is 12s says:

    Sooooooo I am very happy to announce, but the Seahawks were the last team from the NFC West to win a Super Bowl.
    Rams fans, I am thirsty. feel free to cry in a cup.

    • All I see is 12s says:

      I enjoyed watching the Rams lose way too much. I need to go to Church now…
      On the other hand… Watching those great defenses silence the pass-only analytics crowd of seahawks Twitter was a bit of a cherry on top.

  18. Rob Staton says:

    10-3 Super Bowl

    155 rushing yards vs 62

    No passing TD’s.

    Sean McVay’s offense — 220 total yards and three points.

    But we’ll still hear all about Pete Carroll’s ‘out of date style’ from fans.

    There are multiple ways to win. You’ll always be kept guessing.

    • charlietheunicorn says:

      QB poise and playmaking ability. Goff was not up to the task. I can’t say the play calling helped him….. but the real mystery is how the hell Gurley goes from being #1 piece in the offense to irrelevant in the playoffs. I suspect he was injured and the true extent was never disclosed. Back to Goff, there were plays to be made, but he flat out missed guys or didn’t make the right read or on at least 1 deep pass, decided pre snap he was going up the sideline deep with a pass when a guy was wide open in the middle of the field.

    • H says:

      Can’t wait to see how analytics twitter spins this one.

  19. RWIII says:

    Rob: Who said anything about copying Belichick. I just said he thinks outside the box. One point I want to make is: You can’t copy the Patriots but you can STEAL an idea or two.

    BTW: I would be drafting a pass rusher nearly every year. Especially in the early rounds. If the Hawks can sign Micheal Kendricks (not a sure thing) and then add another pass rusher. There defense will improve. In addition to finding a pass rusher in the draft there is a good chance they will find a linebacker and another defensive in the draft.

  20. Nathan W. says:

    Worst super bowl ever??

    • Aaron says:

      Not if your name is Pete Carroll. He was probably fired up the entire game with that defensive back and forth. Also, the team that ran more effectively and more times won, so he must have been jacked about that.

    • Volume12 says:

      One of. Boring would be the word I’d describe it as. Louis Riddick is probab!y still yelling at the sky about defensive performance as if anyone gives a sh**. People want to be entertained. 5 yard slants and 7 yard outs is just bad football.

      Could you imagine paying all that $ if your weren’t a fan of either team to basically see Michigan vs Rutgers?

  21. DC says:

    Well at least the Rams didn’t win… That’s something

    • Volume12 says:

      Yeah, I’m so happy for Boston. That city has been starved of a championship forever now.

      • Kenny Sloth says:

        Tom Brady wore a MAGA hat in his locker and proclaimed his “friend” Trump would make a “great president”.

        I never cared who won but I was going to revel in eithers sorrow FOR SURE

        And now at least we won’t have to hear “Defending Champs” applied to LA all year

      • Group Captain Mandrake says:

        I’ll be honest, I was rooting for the Patriots strictly because of the rivalry with the Rams. And it did not feel right. This was probably the least interested I’ve ever been in a Super Bowl. And I stupidly watched the whole game.

        • downtownjewelrybryan says:

          i know what you mean. i’ve never simultaneously cheered and dry heaved in my life as i did after some of those edelman receptions.

  22. EP says:

    Not to be bias but I’m going to be bias, we could have won that, we’re not far off it. Bring on 2019

    • Aaron says:

      Hawks are very close indeed. But they need a 1 or 2 seed to have a chance. In fact it’s almost impossible nowadays to get to the Super Bowl without a first round bye. Calling it right now that the Rams are going to overthink this offseason and be flat next year. Not saying they’re going to be bad, probably 11-5ish, but they have expensive vets, an aging o line, and a scheme on offense that over this season was figured out. The Hawks have a great shot at the division. Go Hawks!!!

    • Volume12 says:

      Let us never forget that a PC team put up 40 pts on a Sean McVay team that only scored 3 yesterday.

  23. Largent80 says:

    That halftime show was exactly like the game, a steaming pile of Hank. As Bugs Bunny would say….What an Ultra Maroon 5.

    And by the way, The Rams went all in for this year and now they will have to pay the piper.

    • Rob Staton says:

      The Rams aren’t going anywhere in 2019. They have $32m in free cap space. They can save another $8-9m by cutting Mark Barron alone. And their only significant 2019 FA’s are Ndamukong Suh, LaMarcus Joyner, Roger Saffold and Dante Fowler Jr. So they can retain all of those four if needs be, or replace them (maybe even upgrade them). But after 2019 they will have issues because that’s when they need to make a call on Goff (and will presumably pay him) and some of their second tier players will be moving on. It’ll put a lot of strain on their ability to win while paying Donald, Goff and Gurley major money.

      • AndrewP says:

        I look at it this way… I’m sure a locker room led by Gosseling lookalike, and containing Peters/Talib/Suh will handle a day like yesterday just fine!

        And, man… it’s almost like without this immense talent in Gurley at full strength, McVay wasn’t actually reinventing the wheel…

      • RWIII says:

        Rams vs. Seahawks 2019. I am not saying that the Seahawks will beat out the Rams. But I do think the Seahawks have a legitimate shot. Seattle’s defense will be better. The Rams will still be good. But they will not be as good as last year. Seattle’s last game was Jan. 5th. The Seahawks compared to the Rams will have an extra month off to recuperate. Bill Walsh said when a team goes to the Super Bowl there is enormous wear and team on a football team. The Patroits are the exception to the rule.

        I understand that Gurley was not 100%. In fact he was no where even close to being 100%. The Rams also played w/o Cooper Kupp. So the Rams played w/o two of their three best offensive players. But I do think the Patroits gave the Seahawks a blueprint in how to at least slow down the Rams offense.

        The Rams took two games from the Seahawks this year. I don’t see that happening next year. To lose the Super Bowl the way the Rams did has to be devastating. Goff was horrible(not all his fault). It is really hard to go this far and then lose the big game. Especially in the NFC. Where there are SO MANY good teams. The players can say they will put this game behind them. Well good luck on that.

        Despite the fact that Cooper Kupp did not play and Todd Gurley was a none factor. Pete Carroll and Co. can take away lot from this game.

        BTW: Pete Carroll does not like to Blitz. Will the Patroits were blitzing all day long. Hopefully Carroll was taking notes.

        • Rob Staton says:

          I agree the Seahawks have a shot to top the Rams. They lost both games in 2018 but nearly won both. So they’re not miles away.

          I didn’t notice a heavy dose of blitzing though last night. I saw a front four with two further athletic defenders holding the edge to take away a lot of the RB passes and sweep-stuff. They dared the Rams to focus on an inside-running attack and backed themselves to defend it. They took away their ability to stretch the field and played superbly in the secondary when needing to match-up. I didn’t see blitzes. I saw a fantastically orchestrated game-plan to nullify a lot of what LA does well. Classic BB.

          • RWIII says:

            Dave Wyman said that the Patroits were blitzing 85% of the time. I was just going by what he said.
            I do think the Seahawks need to blitz more. They also need to throw more passes to their running backs. Those 6, 7, 8 yard completions MOVE THE CHAINS. Seattle has way to many 3 & Outs. What is interesting with the Seahawk offense is: It seems like once they get a first down then they get into a rhythm. Things start to click. It’s just getting that first down. Brock Huard would like to see more screen passes. I agree. Screen passes will slow down the pass rush. James White makes big bucks by catching passes out of the backfire. I would LOVE to see Chris Carson and Raashad Penny catching passes out of backfield in the open field.

            One other point. Everyone says that Russell Wilson holds onto the football too long. So that is one reason why he has soo many sacks. It’s not all on the lineman. I agree. But he also makes big plays. I am just as guilty as anyone for complaining when he gets a sack for holding onto the football too long. But he also makes a TON of big plays. You can’t have it both ways.

            • Rob Staton says:

              I haven’t studied the game and maybe Dave has but I didn’t see much blitzing. He might be interpreting their six man front and gameplan as a blitz but I wouldn’t agree with that description.

              Pete Carroll’s defense is not blitz heavy and never has been. I wouldn’t expect a big change there.

    • Georgia Hawk says:

      They’ll have a few decisions to make this year, but I think they have a good shot next year to get back. I think the really big thing to watch with them is the O Line, its collective age and the possibility of retirements or digressing play that could derail an awful lot for them. Wonder how Gurley does without the red sea parting in front of him every play…

    • cha says:

      2020 is when they have to pay the piper.

      Goff, Brockers, Talib, Peters, Sullivan are their big FA’s. Whitworth too but he’ll probably have retired by then.

    • Largent80 says:

      Another part of what I mean by “paying the piper” is that very real super bowl hangover. All of that hard work poofed into a fart in the wind in an hours worth of playing time. Now they have to do it all over again, and statistics say that most teams that lose that game don’t return to it.

  24. clbradley17 says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9qLGZfYe20

    3 of our possible draftees from WVU in this these highlights against OK looking very good. Grier at QB maybe we can pick up in the 2nd after a poor Senior Bowl week, along with most of the QBs there. He was 32 of 49 (65.3%) for 539 yards and 4 TDs and threw the long ball very well. WR Jenning could be a mid-round target, 6’1″ 213, consistently got separation better than the other WRs including his more acclaimed teammate David Sills, had 225 yards with a 32.1 avg. for 2 TDs on 7 of 10 targets. Also had a TD and another 54 yard rec. in the Senior Bowl and was able to get separation all week.

    And check out #88 TE/FB Trevon Wesco, had 49 yards on 4 of 5 targets, blocked for the RB on many plays as a FB, and blocked as an extra OL several times ala George Fant, although usually on the left side. Was praised consistently at the Senior Bowl practices for his ability to get open and for his route running and blocking, was Tony Pauline’s partner on his podcasts’ offensive player of the day for the south team on day 3 as I recall. He’s slightly shorter than Sample, just under 6’3 1/2″ to just over 6’4 1/2 for Sample, but also a great blocker, route runner and gets open, rated a couple rounds later than Sample by Tony Pauline after the Senior Bowl, could be drafted later day 3 in rd. 6 according to him. Longer arms/wingspan than Sample – 34 5/8 and 81 1/4 for Wesco to 33 1/2 and 79 1/8 for Sample, and weighs 20 lbs more – 270 for Wesco to 250 for Sample. Reminds me a lot of Dissly at about the same size with the ablility to get open/find the seam and a very good blocker. It would be great to get another TE with Uncle Will’s attributes a couple rounds later.

  25. UKAlex6674 says:

    Enjoyed that! Great show of defense on both parts and the tactical battle between the coaches. Not sure why anyone would class it as a dull Superbowl! Just backs up the old adage defense wins championships. x

    • Aaron says:

      Totally agree. In a year where that old adage of “defense wins championships” seemed to be going the way of the dodo bird. The new shiny toy finally lost its luster. This was totally Wade Philips vs. Bill Belichick. They showed Wade and Bill more than they showed McVay. The longest they did show McVay and his “what the heck happened” face was at the very end when the clock hit 0:00, loved that!

    • JohnH says:

      It seemed to me much less “amazing defense” and much more “inept offense.”

      • Aaron says:

        Rams offense was inept for sure. The Pats offense was not great but was doing just enough of what they wanted to do. They had almost double the number of first downs, more yards per play, per pass, and per run. More rushing yards and plus 8 minutes TOP. Wade Philips was fantastic and kept the Rams in this game until the end by holding the Pats to 3/12 on third down. Without that then the Pats would’ve easily won by 20 or more.

        Essentially it took the Pats until that TD drive in the fourth to get to around 60 plays (where defenses start to slow down with fatigue) and they ended up with 21 completions plus 32 runs. That’s 53, and Pete always says if you hit 50 you win 80% of the time. Rams were inept on offense but you gotta give credit to Bill Belichick and his defensive team for that masterfully executed gameplan against the Rams offense.

  26. millhouse-serbia says:

    Tony Pauline has Brian Burns at 21 for seahawks in his two round mock.

  27. McZ says:

    Same crap as every year. Belichick studies the QB, and plays to his weaknesses. Did it to Rivers, did it to Wilson… Goff is not able to make a second read and takes garbage decisions. PC knows it, so does BB… dang dang.

    After having slept a couple of nights over this RW thing, I completely stopped worrying. RW will play 2019, they can franchise him 2020, maybe even 2021. This aligns with PCs new contract. We are three complete seasons away from knowing, what 40m are worth in 2022s money.

    What I would want to know is, if another player can step up his game to be a viable injury replacement, optionally successor, before this date. Will Grier is just one prospect, but one that is considerably undervalued. Can he play like Dak Prescott? He surely can.

    So, we basically can concentrate on real problems…

    The main problem is our FA gap. Only half of the team is under franchise control, we only have a few picks and are under pressure to trade.

    And… btw, AAF starts next Saturday. Could be fun and shorten our annual pro football dearth.

  28. Volume12 says:

    Seattle wouldn’t take LSU CB Greedy Williams with their first overall selection would they? I mean, a 6’2-6-3 raw corner with speed ain’t easy to find.

    I know it’s been mentioned here but Seattle really is in a position to go BPA this year.

  29. RWIII says:

    One of my core priniciples is draft a pass rusher early in the draft. Next to QB these players are gold. If you don’t believe me just look what these guys are making in free agency. This is the Hawks biggest need (and most difficult to find) need to find an interior pass rusher. Someone to pair up with Jarran Reed. I thought Naz Jones might have been a possibility but he did the Houdini act and disappeared. Don’t know what happened to Naz Jones. Sounds like he might play the 5 technique next year. Rasheem Green might be someone they can kick inside in passing situations. Don’t know. But I did some checking. Rasheen Green’s had better numbers in the 10 yard dash, 20 yard dash and 40 yard dash.