Thoughts on Ugo Amadi, Travis Homer and John Ursua

May 3rd, 2019 | Written by Rob Staton

I’m starting to look through the rookie class and here are some of the notes I made on three of Seattle’s day-three picks.

Ugo Amadi (S, Oregon)

It was a really pleasant surprise watching Amadi. His testing numbers were only OK. He ran a 4.51 at 5-9 and 199lbs plus a 4.19 short shuttle and a strangely poor 7.21 three cone. He only jumped a 32.5 inch vertical. That’s probably why he lasted as long as he did because on tape you don’t see any of this. He’s incredibly sudden and quick. You see genuine dynamism when he blitzes and he covers ground very quickly. He has an excellent feel for sitting in coverage then reading/reacting.

I came away believing he could play free safety. Initially you look at his make-up, projection and some of the tape and you assume nickel. There’s no doubt he has the capability to move closer to the LOS and play as a big nickel type. His tackling appeared fine overall with some room for improvement. He has some versatility.

Yet I came away really intrigued by his free safety potential. Look — he isn’t Earl Thomas. He’s not that rangy, cover-every-blade type of defensive back. You see his quickness on tape though and combined with his awareness and ability to cover ground quickly — it’ll be intriguing to see how he handles a more orthodox safety role.

Amadi is a bundle of energy on the field. He celebrates every hit, tackle or big play. He’ll energise his team mates if he plays with the same confidence you see at Oregon. He was voted a permanent team captain. Importantly he’s been able to make big plays — including 25 career PBU’s and nine interceptions with four touchdowns. The Seahawks need playmakers at the back end. Whether he’ll earn a starting role in 2019 remains to be seen but don’t be shocked if Amadi inserts himself as a long term feature in the secondary. I liked him a lot more than I expected and he has a lot of potential.

Travis Homer (RB, Miami)

He’s smaller than they usually draft at 5-10 and 201lbs but there’s absolutely no doubt Homer is a Seahawks style running back. He finishes, he runs people over and never volunteers to dip out of bounds. He brings physicality to the position but also has an excellent ability to cut-back against the grain to exploit holes and provide misdirection. He has a very fluid weaving style to find a crease and run into daylight. He’s tough to bring down and runs with a purpose.

His physical profile backs this up. He jumped a 39.5 inch vertical. Explosive traits are a lot more important than pure speed at the running back position. Although he ran a very decent 4.48 at the combine he doesn’t have a second gear when he breaks free and is often tackled from behind by a chasing defender.

As a pass protector he’s very good. Not Damien Harris level but not far off. That’ll help him compete for the third down back role. As a catcher there isn’t much to see on tape. Homer was mainly used on dump-offs and passes into the flat. His hands seem fine and he can chip away in the passing game even if he’s not an X-factor.

Strangely enough his running style is very similar to Doug Baldwin. Watch his body when he accelerates — they just have very similar body language as runners.

Pete Carroll said Homer was the top special teams player on their board and he’ll have a big role there and for that reason he has a legit shot to make the roster. He needs to improve his ball security though. He fumbled four times — once every 42 carries — at Miami. Even so I’m surprised he lasted into round six.

John Ursua (WR, Hawaii)

The thing I really like about Ursua is NO wasted movement. He gets into his routes quickly and gets on with the job. It’s why I never rated Andy Isabella (the now Cardinals receiver). Watching Isabella at times was akin to watching a break-dancing competition. Ursua is the complete opposite. The Hawaii offense asked him to line up in the slot and get into a route quickly then settle into a soft zone in the defense. He was very good at sensing the right place to be and he made it count with 1343 yards and 16 touchdowns in 2018 alone.

I really like the way he reads a secondary to find ways to get open. On multiple occasions he would read the two deep safeties and if they split to the outside in coverage he’d get beyond the linebacker and settle. If the safeties stayed home he’d break off to the sideline knowing it’d be very difficult for a bigger defender to stick. Hawaii did a very good job too of putting him in favourable coverage situations and he often gained decent mismatches against the LB or safety.

I like how he was able to keep on the move and uncover in the red zone. You can see why the Seahawks like him for a scrambling quarterback. Ursua isn’t a dynamic athlete but he’s savvy. He’s not Doug Baldwin physically. He only runs a 4.58 and his three-cone of 6.78 is about two tenths slower than Baldwin’s. I’d forget about any comparison to Baldwin. He’s a pure slot who gets open with no-nonsense routes and awareness. He is limited to the slot though with his size and the only real plays he made by the sideline were outs and wheel routes.

Ursua competes for the ball and he’s a reliable target. He’s competing with a very crowded receiver room and will need to make every opportunity count. His intelligence and ability to get open without relying on quickness and athleticism makes him an interesting test case for whether that translate to the next level.

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172 Responses to “Thoughts on Ugo Amadi, Travis Homer and John Ursua”

  1. Naks8 says:

    Totally agree about ursua. He knows how to get open. One big thing he has going for him is that he’s a totally different receiver than all the other guys they have. Metcalf/moore/turner/Scott are all “bigger” receivers that are more fast then quick. If ursua can carve out a role in the slot then he can be the next welker/Edelman/Beasley.

    • Rob Staton says:

      I’d just urge caution that the Seahawks don’t really use those Welker/Edelman types and they’re just as likely to challenge one of the other guys to simply take on some slot duties. We’ll see.

      • whit21 says:

        Watching Ursua’s highlights he does look surprisingly like doug baldwin. He shares the same frame and height with longer arms for his height. Rob Rang said he could statistically be the highest impact rookie of this class..

        • Rob Staton says:

          I didn’t see Doug Baldwin. As noted in the article, I don’t think it’s a comparison. Ursua is different.

          As for being the highest impact rookie… well… let’s see if he makes the team first.

          • GoHawksDani says:

            I think he’s different than Baldwin in some aspects, but also really similar in other aspects.
            Baldwin doesn’t win by superb athleticism or physique. He’s savvy, smart, good route runner, great catcher, body control and hands. Rob, you grabbed out 1-2 testing numbers where they were different, but in every other category they are really-really similar.
            Ursua won’t take off the top of the defense, and he won’t grab the ladder for jump balls, but as a trusted receiver in scramble drills, a good slot and also lining up some on the outside, he could be a pretty good addition. And as much the Hawks need a Metcalf/Lockett type of guy, who can break free for the deep ball, they also need a trustworthy guy who can be there if all hell breaks loose. They wouldn’t sacrifice next year’s pick just for fun. They traded back into the draft to get him. They intrigued by him, they like him. He might not make the roster, but I feel he has pretty good chance

            • Rob Staton says:

              Please don’t accuse me of basing an argument based on two testing numbers.

              I’ve watched Ursua now — multiple games as with the other two players in this article. Just because he’s a slot receiver doesn’t mean we get to compare him to Baldwin. Baldwin hasn’t even been a pure slot for Seattle. He’s been the nearest thing to a modern day #1 Wilson has had. He is incredibly dynamic and sudden, very capable of getting open with his release alone and he has speed and quickness to separate on deeper routes, the ability to progress to a second gear to gain final separation on a deep or fade. He is a majestic route runner.

              Ursua isn’t the same player, as I’ve noted in this piece. He was used almost exclusively in the slot and schemed two ways. To match up against linebackers and safeties where he was able to exploit 1v1 situations and to identify the soft spot in coverage and run to space. He doesn’t have that initial quickness on his release that matches to Baldwin, he isn’t juking anyone out of there cleats like Baldwin, he only runs to the sideline on wheel routes.

              Does he do a good job doing what Hawaii asked? Yes. Does he stay active to work openings in the red zone? Yes. Has he looked like a reliable target in college? Yes.

              He’s a seventh round flier who will have to win a role on the roster. We have no idea of knowing whether he’ll make it or not.

              I’ll keep fighting for perspective.

              • GoHawksDani says:

                I don’t think anyone saying he IS Baldwin. But he’s the closest thing to Baldwin on our roster based on most of their measurements and style. He’s nowhere near Baldwin, and 99,9999% no rookie will ever be exactly like Baldwin. He’s a pure slot now. But maybe he can be more when he has more exp in the NFL.

                He’s not as refined as a route runner and he’s not as quick as Baldwin. He does not have the experience Baldwin has and maybe had.

                BUT

                They’re have similar height, Baldwin was a bit heavier but not by a lot.
                Baldwin ran a faster 40, but only by 0.08
                10 yard split difference 0.04
                Same vertical, Baldwin jumped a little bit longer broad (3″)
                20 yard shuttle diff is 0.1
                3 cone was much better for Doug

                So Baldwin is the better athlete based on their pro day numbers.
                But not like one of them ran 4.3 forty the other 4.6
                Not like 34 vs 37 vert
                They are different but a bit similar.
                DK never be Baldwin that is for 10000% sure. Ursua is kind of similar. KIND OF. He’s probably more similar to Keenan Reynolds. But Ursua seems pretty smart and a solid route runner. Not as refined as Baldwin, and they schemed Ursua into success a bit. But he’s smart and has really good hands. He’s an underdog too. I don’t think he’ll be as angry as Doug, but I hope Ursua will also come hungry for success.

                People will want to compare new players to previous ones. Ton of people compare Metcalf to Megatron. I think it’s a worse comparison. DK already uber-hyped. Not sure how he’ll handle that much pressure to be something magical. They already saying 1000+ yard 10+ TD as a rookie. Too much pressure he might crumble. Ursua is a no name, 7th round guy. Maybe a bit hype for him won’t be that bad

      • Naks8 says:

        A lot of teams not named the patriots struggle to use a true slot receiver.

      • McZ says:

        The point is, that while maybe he will be never ever actively used and possibly not piling up numbers, a true slot receiver in Ursuas mold keeps the defense guessing.

        • Rob Staton says:

          If he’s never actively used or recording numbers then how is he keeping a defense guessing?!

          Otherwise you might as well put me or you in the slot. We won’t do anything but we’ll keep ‘em guessing.

          I liked Ursua’s tape but I’m trying very hard to manage expectations here. He’s a seventh round pick being compared to the best slot receivers ever to play the game, being compared to one of the best receivers to ever play in Seattle and the Seahawks barely use an orthodox slot. I hope it works out for him but let’s see.

          • Naks8 says:

            For sure. It’s how you use the players not just the skill set they bring. Imagine procise catching passes in the James white role. But unfortunately we hardly throw to our backs

            • jamho3 says:

              I think we do throw to our backs.

              It’s something I’ve been tracking and I expected us to throw it to our backs more in 2017 it didn’t happen but in 2018 I think we go to where we want to be.

          • McZ says:

            I think, we can agree that having a slot option to inherit from DB89 is better than not having one. And it’s not, that I’m fired up to Edelman superstar degree; excitement is the term I would use about that diverse group of receivers.

            We have drafted an unproven commodity, who had 16 TDs, surer hands than both of us, able to seperate and happy to work in the slot. If he is on the field and runs intermediate cross routes, you have to defend him, or he will be actively used. This opens possibilities.

          • Elmer says:

            Absolutely right, and it’s important to remember that the Hawks had about 8 WR’s on the roster before the draft. How realistic is it to count on 3 rookie draft choices and a rookie UDFA to ALL find places on the 53 man roster at the expense of veterans and practice squad guys from 2018.

            It’s great to be excited about the potential of the new additions to the team, but let’s remember and be excited that returning guys will be competing too.

        • Roadwalker says:

          Keep in mind that if he doesn’t initially make the roster, the Seahawks may lose him on waivers but he could also end up on their practice squad, where he could work more on his game and be called back up later if there is an injury or some other receiver underperforms and gets cut.

          Always a little risky given the waiver wire, but my prediction is that if he doesn’t make the opening day roster, you will see Ursua on the practice squad.

    • JC3 says:

      He reminds me of Paul Skansi.

      • JC3 says:

        A player not good enough to start but stick around for 8 years, but we knew the game is toasted when he is in the game.

  2. Bigten says:

    Thank you for continuing to bless us with content Rob!!
    Do you see any trade value in any of our wide receivers? For a late round like a 6th or 7th or player4player even? I’m very hopeful that all three of our drafted WRs make the roster. So With Lockett and those 3, leaves only room for one WR out of Moore/Brown/Darboh/Ferguson and any others. And that’s only if ADB does in fact retire. So we will have a handful of competent WRs that will be getting cut.

    • Rob Staton says:

      I don’t think there’s any trade value. At an absolute stretch maybe Jaron Brown for a 7th or something but Carroll has been talking him up.

      • Bigten says:

        Bummer. I was hoping that considering we gave up a 7th for a guy like hollister that has zero production, there would be some value in a guy like David Moore, who had production last year. I agree that PC seems to have Brown in his future plans, and maybe like you have said Ursua doesn’t make the team and Moore does. I just like all three of the wr draftees.

        • Rob Staton says:

          I mean… maybe there is a market for Moore. But later in the year teams know you have to cut players so unless you absolutely desperately have to have someone you wait for them to be released.

          Moore might be on this team though. Very easily. It’ll be a good competition this year.

  3. Kenny Sloth says:

    I’ve been loving Phil Haynes’ tape.

    How do you view he and D. Christmas

    • CaptainJack says:

      Haynes is such a beast, seriously fun tape.

      • Cheese22 says:

        Haynes is huge, strong and nasty. A year or two behind Iupati and Fluker may be perfect time frame for his development. Excited to see what he contributes.

    • GoHawksDani says:

      Based on PCs comments I think they are both project players. Haynes did not played in 3 point stance previously and he’s pretty raw. Christmas will be probably camp body or PS candidate or depth guy

  4. GauxGaux says:

    Thanks, Rob!

    Feeling great about our depth (curious where McKissic fits) and excited to see these guys carve out roles in the preseason.

    I really like that we only have one (giant) hole that we can focus on… hopefully we can pick up a healthy McCoy/Ansah combo!

    Go Hawks

  5. Kenny Sloth says:

    Does anybody actually think DK is gonna be a 1000yd and 10td receiver in Seattle??

    Expectations a little high imo. We’ll be lucky if he matches college production imo

    • Whit21 says:

      It depends on his ability to catch.. the offense will give him chances to have 1 on 1 coverage.. if he can get consistently open and make catches, then he should be utilized enough for 1k season.. that breakdown of some of his tape on youtube compared him to calvin johnson pretty well.. its just a matter of getting open and catching what comes his way.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Probably not given Seattle barely ever has 1000 yard receivers.

      Can he develop into a big X-factor for this offense though? Yes.

    • CaptainJack says:

      Kenny,

      DK had underwhelming production in college for someone of his athletic profile.

      I fully suspect that he’ll improve on production in the pros. Will he get past the 1k mark rookie year? I don’t know, I doubt it, but I’m sure he’ll get there eventually working with Wilson.

      • kevin says:

        I could not be more excited that the seahawks drafted DK. I would have been just as glad if they picked him with their first pick instead of their third as I have been hoping for a big fast receiver every draft since RW became our starter.

        That said, I am expecting Martavis Bryant type of production here. 20-50 catches, 500 yards. He has little more than a season of college experience so expect his first year to be a bit rough. I am perfectly fine with that.

        Don’t underestimate his impact just because he does not get the numbers, he will make running the ball easier, he will make other receiver’s numbers better and we will win more games.

        • Pugs1 says:

          I watch a lot of Ole Miss football and in my opinion too much is being made of DK’s quote lack of productivity. He played two games as a freshman before hurting his foot and getting shut down for the year. He played a full season in 2017 39 receptions 646 yards and 7 TD’s with a offense who spread the ball around to multiple receivers. Last year before the neck injury DK had 26 catches for 569 yards and 5 TD’s playing with a juco QB. Never mind that OM has been on probation for two years and he had three different QB’s throwing to him. Two head coaches & three different OC’s over that time. Not he most stable environment in Oxford. With all that said I’m way more concerned about his injuries than his production and even then his injuries are things that happen on a football field not a bunch of soft tissue injuries.

          • Stregatto says:

            Thanks for the points on context here Pugs. I hadn’t looked closely at his OC or really QB situation in college..

    • Trevor says:

      I definitely see 10TD+ potential if he stays healthy. Not sure about the 1000 yds with the way the Hawks run their offense. I could see a stat line like 55 receptions /800 yds / 10TDs.

      I am anxious the see this Jazz Ferguson kid in pre season as well. I wonder could they use him as pass catching TE. At 6-5 240lbs he would not need to get a whole lot bigger.

      • CaptainJack says:

        I was wondering about Jazz Ferguson has a potential tight end convert.

        I hope he makes the roster somehow.

        • Rob Staton says:

          Based on Ferguson turning up at 240lbs having played in the 220’s it’s not a good start. And he looked really slow and sluggish running the WR drills in the clips published on Twitter today. There’s a long way to go but practise squad might be his future at best.

          • James says:

            Yes, Jazz is a clear candidate for the practice squad. Unless he explodes in the preseason games, it is unlikely a team would add a player to their 53 who is not ready to contribute, but he has the measurables to be a backup SE, and if he loses 20 lbs, his feet may catch up to his hops. But right now he is the classic example of the tall receiver who doesn’t have the quicks to shake a pro CB out of his shadow. He demonstrates, in contrast, why DK is so unique and special.

            • Roger Davis says:

              Rob and James

              I did not know he came in at 240. But that does explain what those drills showed. I was stunned by how plodding and slow he looked compared to all the others. He looked like a slow offensive guard or tackle running with the receivers for a lark. It was depressing.

              As to DK. My, oh my. I believe we have a keeper.

              I keep repeating to my self this quote of DK’s: “I love to block.” I AM SO looking forward to seeing the team take advantage of that. I can see Fant at TE outside of Brown with DK smashing down from wideout. Between them 880+ pounds of hell bent for leather looking to move mountains and rearrange the continents! OK – I get overly excited at times… but a guys gotta dream big!

          • Elmer says:

            Fat and slow is not a good combination in football. I hope he improves on his start.

            I noticed that two players from Florida were listed as rookie tryout players, one of them is Martez Ivey. He sounds like a big run blocking guy, do you think that he has a chance of being signed to the roster, joining the other UDFA’s?

      • Coleslaw says:

        I agree on that stat line. I think he could hit that this year if he can win some 50 50 balls in the end zone right away. Hes one of those freaks, they usually come in and dominate DBs right away, I’m betting on him getting at least 40 catches 500 yards and at least 6 TDs this year. I would not be surprised to see him get something like 50/650/8 this year.

        I really believe that him and Gary Jennings are gonna come in and contribute right away. Brown and Moore will play too, but I think they both have a realistic shot to become our #2 and #3 receivers. Jennings has great size and speed too, hes just in Metcalfs shadow. I think Wilson might love a guy like like Jennings, and I know Wilson loves big targets, Metcalf is his new Megatron (hopefully).

    • jamho3 says:

      1000 yards and 10 TD’s

      Not at all likely.

      For anyone that’s been watching our targets for the last 10 years. We RARELY get a WR to 100 targets. You’d have to project Lockett to get the lions share of targets I think he had 74 or so last year. I fully expect SEA to pass the ball MUCH more on 1st downs this year. None the less not sure what DK might do with 60-75 targets or so?

    • Jeff M. says:

      1000 yds + 10 TDs is actually pretty rare, even with the current passing explosion.

      This past season 4 WRs (Brown, Adams, Hill, Hopkins) plus one TE (Kelce) hit it.

      2017 Hopkins was the only guy in the league to do so.

      2016 it was Nelson, Brown, Evans, Beckham.

      2015 did have 9 WRs (plus Gronk) hit it, but most of the time “had 1000+ yds and 10+ TDs” === “was an all pro” and “is a 1000+ yd/10+ TD receiver” (meaning doing it consistently) === “is a hall of famer.”

  6. CaptainJack says:

    Rob,

    After the draft, I comped Ursua to Wes Welker. I agree, I don’t see doug baldwin.

    Ursua pumped out an insane 17 reps on the bench press.

    What do you think of that comp?

    • Rob Staton says:

      The problem with the comp is… every slot receiver is comp’d to Welker or Edelman. Two of the best, if not the best, slot receivers ever. And 99.9% of the players compared to Welker and Edelman aint Welker or Edelman. And they’re not playing in New England with Brady. So for me, John Ursua is John Ursua. I’ve listed some of his skill set here.

      • CaptainJack says:

        Fair enough,
        I’m still pretty high on Ursua.

      • Trevor says:

        I think the Hawks brought Ursua in because he is a pure Slot guy. I agree Rob it will be interesting to see how the Hawks use a guy like that in thier scheme. With his savvy in the middle of the feild and the crazy speed the Hawks have outside at WR I could see him getting a lot of mismatches and openings undereneath.

  7. CaptainJack says:

    While I love the draft, I’m not liking Christmas’s tape. Not a lot of power and slow reaction times. He seems to be a big body and not much more.

  8. charlietheunicorn says:

    Seahawks twitter put out the guys invited to rookie mini camp.
    Holy cow, that is a long list.

    • Trevor says:

      Pete always seems positive about the rookies but I have never heard him sound as excited about a player as he did today talking about Metcalf after Day #1. Pretty clear they think they have something special.

      • charlietheunicorn says:

        He actually was excited about Jazz Ferguson. He said several nice things.. how he really had great body control and worked the boundary well. I don’t think that he came in a bit heavy worried him at the least. He almost talked about him like a move TE, more than a WR, to my ear.

        He lit up like a Christmas tree when talked about the 2 drafted LBs. Both very instinctive and picked up the scheme and made line calls / defense calls throughout practice. Said they both showed smarts and leadership from day #1.

        Very encouraging.

  9. charlietheunicorn says:

    Pete Carroll is going to be on at 1820 (6:20PM) local on KJR950.
    I think it is a live radio interview with Softie.

  10. Coleslaw says:

    Jazz Ferguson looks like he should just get up to 250-260 and play TE. Teach him to block and you could have something there.

    • charlietheunicorn says:

      He ran close to a 4.40 in a pro day I think.
      If he had stayed 1 more year, he would be a top 2 round draft pick according to Dane/Don Bugler (or w/e that one scout analyst guy name is). Just raw in overall skill, but picks up stuff very fast.

    • Rob Staton says:

      I’m not buying this TE talk.

      He’s a X receiver.

  11. Dale Roberts says:

    You mentioned Homer as a YAC Seahawk style running back which brings me to a question about Rashad Penny. He reminded me more of Shaun Alexander after he got paid than a Lynch or Carson because I rarely saw him gain yards after contact. Was I simply seeing the wrong plays? I can’t imagine PC drafting a first round running back who goes down on the first hit. Do you expect that aspect of his game to improve in his second year?

    • Bnebs says:

      He led FBS with broken tackles and had a excellent medical profile. I believe that was a large part of the attraction for the Hawks. I agree though, wanted to see more broken tackles last year, hope he improves on that this year.

    • Saxon says:

      I believe PFF had Penny as the #1 player in yards after contact and one of the tops for broken tackles during his final college season. I was disappointed he broke so few tackles as a rookie, but there was an injury issue and he still performed fairly well overall. The Shaun Alexander comp is definitely valid, but I expect him to be more physical in 2019.

      It would be interesting to see Rashaad get 20+ carries in a game. I think he might put up better overall numbers than Carson, but I doubt he’ll ever punish the defensive players the way Carson can. That violent element is prized by Pete.

      • LLLOGOSSS says:

        Can we all please take just a sec to recognize that Rashaad Penny would be one of the best RB’s of the decade if he became Shaun Alexander.

        I did not see the tackle-breaking last year, true, and I think the ”yards after contact” stat was more him breaking several *really* long runs after a failed arm tackle at the LOS.

        But if you want to talk about special traits, he was drafted because people that big are not supposed to be that fast and nimble. He’ll never be Chris Carson running between the hashes, but he has a chance to be a very good player.

    • Rob Staton says:

      It’s year one

    • AlaskaHawk says:

      I think we fans sometimes get caught up in a notion of what a Seahawks player should be based on the great players of the past. I keep thinking of powerful runners like Lynch. In 2018 there were some more powerful running backs but the Seahawks went for a running back with a more smooth running style that was breaking some tackles in college. It shocked a lot of the fans. However Carson is fulfilling the power running back role at this time. And the reality is that it isn’t hard to find running backs in this market. It’s just hard to find backs who stay healthy. Davis looked really good with stats better than Lynch until he busted his ankle. Anyway- let’s see how Penny does this year.

    • jamho3 says:

      Remember Shaun Alexander wasn’t Shaun in his first year. I absolutely saw what you were talking about Penny looked tentative no matter how I’d sliced it.

      Watching Penny run last year he didn’t have “clean” holes to hit where he could build his speed or make his glide cuts at speed. Similar to how he ran in college. None the less. Running in “dirty” holes or small spaces is what the NFL requires. Which also dictates that a team needs more than 1 starting quality RB. Which is WHY picking the guy we wanted in 2018 wasn’t a WASTED pick just because Carson happened to run much better. #thankfully.

      Players improve as they go I expect Penny to improve. Both he and Carson did a nice job catching and pass blocking last year. Davis was better in my estimation but that’s how it goes.

      I think the competition at RB is going to be very thrilling in 2019. Mckissic deserved more touches, and Prosise is fighting for millions of dollars.

      We ought to do fine.

  12. Saxon says:

    Rob, as much as I love your evaluations pre-draft I’m even more hyped to read your thoughts about the guys we picked. Thanks, as always, for your insight!

    I’m extremely excited about this class! Looking forward to your evals of the Utes. We passed on some pretty nice players for those kids.

  13. Hawkin says:

    Pete Carroll said something today that reminded me of what he said prior to the draft. He was talking about taking Poona ford. He said, “we look for guys that are just rare and hard to come by. You’ve never seen a guy built quite like Poona.”

    Pete, talking about Metcalf, said today “there’s never been a guy at the combine who could run that fast at that size”

    Looking forward to identifying and discussing those players next year!

  14. EranUngar says:

    When talking about D.K. potential 1,000 yards rookie season – Even the great Megatron playing for a pass happy offense did not break the 1,000 yards barrier in his rookie season.

    Another interesting point – According to PFF, pass rush efficiency does no correlate with winning football games, coverage does. I am as high as you can possibly be about Flowers 2nd year. I also believe that part of the reason Griffin did not show enough improvement in his 2nd year had to do with his off season preparation. You can read a lot about how much he was helping his brother making the transition to the NFL. It had to effect how much he was doing to get himself ready for the season. If i’m right about it, having his brother to prepare together this year should make up for it.

    As for Baldwin retirement – PC repeated the “wait & see” status quo. However, he did mention that he talked to Doug yesterday when they met in the weight room. I am beginning to feel that Doug’s retirement is much like Earl’s after is surgery. Both are too committed to the game to call it quits on their own. They express their frustration from not being able to do it while they rehab but once his body gets right he’ll fight to play again.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Ah yes. The whole ‘coverage more important than pass rush’ angle.

      AKA the new ‘running game doesn’t matter’ from the analytics mob.

      Can’t wait to hear this argument rammed down our throats for the next year.

    • CaptainJack says:

      Metcalf is different than Megatron.

      Different players.

      Let’s see what Metcalf can do. I’m not saying he’s going to be spectacular rookie year, but I’m not rooting against him like others here seem to be doing.

      Let’s just wait and see. He’s a special special talent.

  15. Awsi Dooger says:

    Good point regarding not much variety in the Canes passing attempts to running backs. Under Richt it was always screens or underneath crossers, the type of stuff Ohio State likes to do.

    The only semi-downfield throw to Homer I can think of was 2017 against Georgia Tech. That play happened smack in front of where I sit at the Miami games. That’s why I remember it. Homer darted toward the left pile on and Rosier hit him with a dart that was maybe 10 yards downfield. Homer barely got into the end zone.

    That was actually one of Homer’s best games period, especially since the weather and playing conditions changed dramatically as the game went on but Homer adjusted and was one of the key factors in the late comeback drive.

  16. H says:

    I think the plan will be for Lockett to take over primary slot duties, with DK, Moore and Jennings competing to be the outside guys in 3 receiver sets. I do really like the look of Ursua though, seems like a high character guy as well. I hope he makes the roster.

    I do wonder though, if Lockett assume Doug’s role as wr1 do we finally need to take him off kick/punt return duties? and if so who is the favourite, Penny, McKissick, Amadi, someone else?

  17. H says:

    The most important part of the off-season… Rookie jersey numbers

    95 – DE L.J. Collier

    27 – SS Marquise Blair

    14 – WR DK Metcalf

    57 – LB Cody Barton

    11 – WR Gary Jennings

    60 – G Phil Haynes

    28 – FS Ugo Amadi

    55 – LB Ben Burr-Kirven

    25 – RB Travis Homer

    67 – DT Demarcus Christmas

    15 – WR John Ursua

    Travis Homer taking over Sherm’s jersey is a little controversial.

  18. ChrisClem says:

    I get that we should not compair Ursua to Doug Baldwin and that he is an entirely different player. I would definitely say he has the potential to be great in the slot though. His 3-cone may not be as fast as Dougs, but at 6.77 he would tie for first at the combine. Also, you did not mention his short shuttle. At 4.08 seconds he would tie for third at the combine. Actually even better than Doug, who ran a 4.26 ss.

    Other than that, great read as always. Looking forward ro reading the rest of your break downs.

    • Gaeleck says:

      Regarding Ursua’s times, it should be mentioned that he suffered a hamstring injury(partial tear) that caused him to miss Hawaii’s bowl game and reportedly hampered him throughout the pre-draft process. In fact, it caused him to sit out yesterday. If we are to analyze this kid based upon those numbers, I feel it only fair that the injury should be considered.

      As for his highlights on YouTube, I was impressed with his feel for space. From what I saw, he has an advanced understanding of not only finding the soft spots of zones, but he is very adept at getting off of the line quickly and into the defender’s personal space before planting and accelerating past the off balance DB or LB. He seems very skilled at using his teammates on rub routes to quickly find the sweet spot while he gets his eyes back to the QB.

      I enjoyed the maturity that came across in his interviews. I’m excited by this player. I have high hopes. I don’t see big numbers in his immediate future, but I smile at the thought of him carving out a roster spot through special teams and then building into a year 2 or 3 surprise. Outside of injury concerns, I see this pick as a part of what could go down as the 2nd best draft class of the PCJS era. Or, who knows…

      I think players from the 2 previous draft classes better be ready to compete. These 11 dudes are looking to take jobs. That doesn’t even count the UDFA’s…

    • HawkfaninMT says:

      Since we like comps…

      How about Jamison Crowder for Ursua… JC came in about 8 lbs heavier, both with some ST experience. Mainly slot, win with route running and quickness. Combine numbers a strikingly similar

      • ChrisClem says:

        The same 40-time, same vertical and similar broad jump. Ursua was far better in the 3-come and the short shuttle (and the bench press). They might be similar though, I just feel we are sleeping on his short area quickness, which is elite.

  19. Ashish says:

    Pete mentioned Amadi will play free safety to start with and nickel. Rob nice observation I think Amadi will good fit at Nickel with some blitz options.

  20. Volume12 says:

    Hope everyone has their sh** together today. Because I didn’t and I wish someone woulda told me. You’ll thank me later.

  21. James says:

    In ten years, only twice have I seen the naturally-irrepressable Pete unable to constrain his amazement and enthusiasm over a rookie after day one of mini camp, and those two were Russell Wilson and DK Metcalf. It may sound crazy, but when I watch the workouts and a select few of his college plays (in an inept and neanderthal Ole Miss offense) DK honestly looks like a R1#1 rare talent. I don’t know how all the other teams talked themselves out of selecting him, but their loss is our gain.

  22. Nano says:

    Thanks, Rob. I really appreciate these quick takes on the players. I’m pleasantly surprised by your conclusions on Amadi. The Hawks seem to know how to get value in the secondary.

    I watched some Davante Davis highlight tape, and, man, does he look like a Seahawks cornerback. (I know, highlight tape . . . ) But the dude is physical and imposing.

  23. charlietheunicorn says:

    Does anyone think they might play more 2 high safety, like PC did back in the USC days, since they have so many safety prospects with good speed? Less single high safety, since you do not have ET playing FS anymore and might need to guard the back of the defense more against all these high flying offenses (Cardinals / Rams / 49ers).

    • Kenny Sloth says:

      I definitely don’t. And even if it’s two safeties high I think it’ll still be a cover 3 shell.

      • Kenny Sloth says:

        /cover 1

        • charlietheunicorn says:

          Could they start going to more quarters coverage?

          The single high safety coverage was susceptible to the “in” cutting routes and slants….

          but they also have mentioned several years in a row trying to go to a big nickel type of coverage with 3 safeties on the field at once…. and if they have the talent on the roster at safety, this is the year. They have 7 or so legit prospects now. Even Millen mentioned he though BKK might be played more as a safety than a traditional LB due to his size and instincts. So I guess they have 8?

      • Volume12 says:

        This. Some cloud coverages as well.

        They didn’t draft those 2 LBs just to play teams and run/chase. Those 2 dudes along with Amadi will allow Seattle to show multiple looks and confuse offenses post snap.

    • Aaron says:

      Don’t know if they’ll play more Cover 2. I definitely think they have the options to play more coverages. They can disguise more pre snap and may have the ability to play man to man more now.

  24. Volume12 says:

    I am fired up about Metcalf and Blair.

  25. charlietheunicorn says:

    WR Roulette
    Lets say they keep 6 guys (even if a rumor was floated they might keep 7)
    Injuries could upset the apple cart, but for grits and shiggles here is a way to early list.

    In Focus
    16 – WR Tyler Lockett
    14 – WR DK Metcalf
    11 – WR Gary Jennings
    15 – WR John Ursua

    The Dreaded Bubble (2 out of 3)
    83 – WR David Moore
    18 – WR Jaron Brown
    87 – WR Jazz Ferguson

    Outside Looking In
    82 – WR Amarah Darboh
    19 – WR Keenan Reynolds
    21 – WR/RB J.D. McKissic**
    22 – WR/RB CJ Prosise**

    Retired
    89 – Doug Baldwin

    • HawkfaninMT says:

      I think Ursua would be in the bubble group along with Keenan Reynolds… and it would expand to 3 of 6

      • Hawktalker#1 says:

        Same thought here. Good call

      • Hawktalker#1 says:

        Almost annoying seeing Darboh’s name continuing to appear. Seems like his time should have expired on showing something worth getting in the mix. Don’t think we’ve seen enough and he should be gone. I have a little more time allotted to CJ, but not much. Pretty much I. The same boat. However, I’d love nothing more than to see them show out, become impact players and make the team. Seems they have the potential, now just need to see the production.

      • charlietheunicorn says:

        This has to be the most competitive group on the Seahawks roster this spring/summer.
        There are plenty of options at each position or type of WR. Darboh has not been a contributor in any real sense, while I have seen McKissic, Brown and Moore contribute on ST as well as the regular offense. I guess it is splitting hairs right now, because if any one guy balls out during TC, they might carve themselves out a niche on the 53 man roster.

        There were perhaps 3-4 more additional WRs in the rookie mini camp, but I’m not expecting any of them to sniff the 53 man roster, so I didn’t include them in this list. Perhaps, in honor of Baldwin (and his journey into the NFL) I should have included them.

    • CaptainJack says:

      I’d think they’d like to keep Brown.

      You don’t want to end up with a situation where Lockett is the most experienced of the group.

    • Coleslaw says:

      I think Ursua should be moved to the bubble. And I think Brown should be moved to the top tier with an asterisk because Pete Carroll has said that Brown will get a lot of looks early on this year and that hes going to be a big part of the plan. However, if one or 2 of the rookies or Moore/Darboh step up, then Brown could be a salary cap cut.

    • I am hoping for your top 4(In Focus) listed plus Jazz Ferguson.

    • GoHawksDani says:

      What we agree on: Lockett, DK, Jennings. Most likely these three will be the starting WRs
      As for depth/rotational/situational guys:
      Moore I think was not that bad, but needs to compete much more, and be better. But I think he’ll stay. He has the most experience and best stats.
      DK, Jennings, Moore all bigger receivers to some extent.
      I feel they’ll want smaller, shifty guys too, so I think Ursua and Reynolds will battle for the slot-kinda-WR spot.
      If they roll with 6, I feel you can pencil in McKissic too. He’ll line up as RB, but he will utilized 90+% as a WR.
      But because he’s a half-WR-half-RB, I think they might roll with 7. The last spot will be battled out between Brown and Darboh. Prosise will most likely go.

      Just as pure assumptions these are my 6+1 WRs:
      #1 Lockett, the true nr1, he’ll see most snaps and have the most targets
      #2 DK, most likely nr2 based on upside and PC really hypes him up. If he can truly be a complete WR, he’ll be easily WR2
      #3 Jennings. He can line up in the slot or outside. If DK drops the ball he might become WR2, but as for now he’s WR3

      #4 (slot, situational guy) Ursua – Reynolds had his shot and I don’t feel he delivered. Keenan might have an athletic upside and spent more time in the NFL, but Ursua is a more pro-ready WR in my opinion
      #5 (depth guy or maybe Jennings can be pushed from the WR3) Moore – He was OK last year, sometimes even good, but need to be more consistent and better
      #6 (depth, special teams) Darboh – Cutting Brown would mean almost +3m CAP space. Brown is a better WR, but Darboh miight be a better special teamer, and not like Brown flashed as a WR. Had a couple of TDs but not many catches. But this position is up for grabs between these two.

      +1 McKissic – He’ll be a missmatch as a WR lining up as an RB. If they wanna roll with 6 WR, he’d be in and Darboh/Brown out. I think he’s even before Ursua/Reynolds and Moore on the depth chart.

  26. King_Rajesh says:

    https://twitter.com/OmarDRuiz/status/1124756366961209345

    Omar Ruiz @OmarDRuiz

    #Seahawks LB Bobby Wagner said he & the team haven’t yet started talks on a new deal. His contract expires after the 2019 season, and he’ll be handling negotiations himself, “I want to retire a Seahawk, but I understand it’s a business.”

    I’m preparing like this is my last year as a Seahawk. If it is, I want to make sure I go out with a bang and make sure I give the city something to remember,” #Seahawks LB Bobby Wagner told me during a charity event at his high school alma mater in Ontario, CA.

    ——

    Does Bobby get done before they start the next phase of Free Agency? Could free up around $5m of Cap Space just in case we need to bust out the checkbook for a couple dudes and to extend Reed.

    I can’t imagine this is a hard contract to do. Bobby is on a HoF track and shows no sign of falling from his elite level of play. LBs can retain their elite form until around 35. Just give him a bump over the C.J. Mosley contract. Keep Russell and Bobby on the same calendar year tracks so the 2012 class sticks together until Bobby can’t play anymore.

    • Rob Staton says:

      If they get Jarran Reed done first they can just franchise tag Wagner.

      • D-OZ says:

        Yea, that’s what i’m thinking. I don’t care what Frank claims, Bobby has always been the leader of that defense. Hmm, interesting footnote there. Dealing away more controversy maybe? Don’t get too damn big for your britches son. IMO… That was kind of a blind-sided swipe I know, butt that is the way the hammer fall’s… Team first brother.Tap out man!!!!

      • King_Rajesh says:

        Why franchise tag Wagner if you don’t have to? He’s been a leader and is the key to the defense. He’s earned a pay raise.

        I would rather the Seahawks not have to use the tag because it always leads to drama (e.g., Frank saying he would play under the tag and then not signing it). Great teams don’t have to use the tag because they plan ahead. Belicheck’s used the tag once in the last 7 years.

        • Rob Staton says:

          Because you might have to.

          Wagner deserves a pay rise but the Jets have screwed the market. So if he wants $19m a year the option to keep him for $15m on the tag is an obvious and understandable situation.

          ‘Great teams don’t have to use the tag’ is just white noise.

          • Hawkmonkey says:

            Nailed it, Rob.

          • King_Rajesh says:

            Why cheap out on our best defensive player? If he wants something reasonable like 18m, the difference between that and 15m isn’t worth fighting over. 3m barely gets you a veteran depth backup. We can always cut a scrub like Mingo and use a rookie there to make up for the difference.

            Keep Bobby happy and the defense will flourish.

            • Rob Staton says:

              It’s not cheaping out.

              It’s called running a football team.

              • King_Rajesh says:

                3m isn’t anything worthwhile. It’s a bit more than half of a fat Eddie Lacy contract and less than half they paid Luke Joeckel to get surgery and ride the bench.

                It’s not worth ruining your relationship with your best defensive player. We just saw how disgruntled Frank got when the Seahawks didn’t pay him. We’ve seen players turn cancerous when they don’t feel like the team is willing to pay them what they’re worth.

                We just got rid of all of that garbage, let’s not start it up again with Bobby, who has been the consummate team player. Pay him his 18m. If this means you cut Mingo or force Baldwin to retire, so be it. Wagner can be with us for maybe 5 more years if he can channel his Ray Lewis. Let’s not ruin the future over some chump change.

                • Rob Staton says:

                  Funny that, because they just traded Frank Clark because while they were happy to franchise him at $17m they weren’t willing to pay him $20m a year.

                  So I guess $3m IS worthwhile.

                  Anyone who thinks the Seahawks relationship with Wagner would be ‘damaged’ because they guarantee him $15.4m in 2020 and then even more in 2021… Players are franchised all the time. It’s called the National Football League.

                  The only people starting any garbage here are the people who think Bobby Wagner’s contract situation is a thing worth discussing. It isn’t. Just forget about it. It’s not even a problem. One way or another it’ll get sorted.

                • Kenny Sloth says:

                  >force Baldwin to retire

                  Jfc

    • Aaron says:

      I definitely see Bobby staying long term unless one of these rookie LBs really REALLY impresses or trade value for Bobby is a lot.

    • line_hawk says:

      They just drafted Barton in 3rd round who plays MLB. I think there is a significant chance they move on from Wagner. They will at least let him test free agency. They will likely get a 3rd comp. they have lately shown unwillingness to give a large 3rd contract & Wagner might get that in free agency.

      • Rob Staton says:

        They won’t move on from Wagner. Absolute worst case scenario is the tag the next two years and three more seasons.

        They’ve needed LB depth for years and that’s why they added Barton and BBK.

        • line_hawk says:

          In 10 years, they have tagged (or 5th yr optioned) 1 player, a kicker. They probably don’t want to pay the market rate for Wagner. And as a vet, I don’t think they want to squeeze him by using the tag. Locker room leaders don’t want to play Year to year. I think they will let him test free agency & if his market is cold, will resign him. But, they won’t tag him & force him to play here for less than his FA worth.

          Barton is a hedge against Wagner leaving. Otherwise, selecting a backup LB over dline in R3 doesn’t make much sense.

          • King_Rajesh says:

            Is it crazy town in here today? Bobby wouldn’t have a cold market, he’s a hall of fame level player. He’d make more than 20m in free agency APY.

            • Kenny Sloth says:

              I mean…. Maybe?

              Von Miller makes 19 and is head and shoulders above any other LB.

              Not that crazy imo

          • Rob Staton says:

            Barton is not a hedge. They know full well they can tag Wagner for two years and thus keep him for three.

            They’ve needed LB depth for years. Carroll stated two years ago they needed to help BW and KJ. And this is the first time since that Seahawks’ style LB’s were available in the draft. So they took them.

            No hedge. Just much needed depth.

  27. D-OZ says:

    It’s a bought that time… Nighty-night everyone…. See ya about 3am Rob. Just an old retired guy. 🙂

    • Shady_Hawkster says:

      *Hush sleepy old guy, you can dream
      of Baldwin and Tate catchin darts in the seam,

      and if Zach bulldozes some holes
      Marshawn gonna go into full beast mode,

      and when Clemons and Big Red take a rest
      Bennet and Avril are here to wreck,

      and when that front seven pins their ears
      The LOB feasts on opponent’s fears,

      but when he wakes up from his nap,
      he get to watch the dawn of another paaack*

  28. Rob , who do you like more comming out of college:

    1. Thompson vs Amadi @FS
    2. Hill vs Blair @SS

    It is interesting that we took 2 FS and 2 SS in 3 years span. Pete will find his DB’s and make them best unit in the league once again.

  29. Cheese22 says:

    I’m a believer that Seattle overlooked the importance of the kicking game the last couple years, or thought they had addressed the position with an old, often injured, washed up leg. Every good team has very good to great kickers. Going after a punter in round 5 last year makes me think they are making moves to solidify a couple of those spots that never seem to be priorities in the draft.
    Another of those non-priority but very important positions is FB, IMO. So, my question is: will they keep Dimel? They’ve used below average blocking fullbacks and TE’s recently. Dimel looks like the type of guy every good running team needs. Does he stick or is it that they are satisfied with continuing the trend of having a cheap lead blocker instead of a true FB?

  30. With the way Seattle drafted on offense and defense, I have come to a conclusion JS/PC drafted not only leaders like Rob and others have pointed out on the board, but also key contributors. I mean if the running game is not working they now have the means to run intermediate and over the top routes to find other ways to control and win games. Maybe we will continue to be run dominate but now there are definitely other options to change the game when one aspect is not working. As far as the defense goes, I think Seattle will be increasing their blitzes, whether that comes from the LB’s, S.Griffen in certain instances or from the CB’s and Safeties. Naz Jones, R. Green and others need to step up until we develop a pass rush. It could definitely be exciting.

  31. cha says:

    Rob general thought on the depth of this draft?

    It may have only had the traditional 15-20 first tier guys and really great depth into the second tier, but unless I’m overly excited about the Hawks’ picks this seemed like a draft that had exceptional depth in the mid to late rounds. Seemed like the late rounds weren’t just toolsy unpolished picks but guys who have legitimate business being on an NFL roster. Which makes the Hawks’ ability to come away with 11 players after starting with 4 draft picks all the more impressive.

    Agree or am I looking at it with blue and green glasses?

    • Rob Staton says:

      I think it had good depth. Day two was strong looking throughout and plenty of good players lasted into day three.

    • RWIII says:

      Cha: What John Schneider did in this draft was.fantastic. Just look at the players Schneider picked on day three. He picked. Gary Jennings, Phil Haynes and Ugo Amadi in round 4. .B.B.K. in round 5. Travis Homer/DeMarcus Christmas in round 6 and John Ursua in the 7th round. This had got to be the greatest Seahawk draft in the JS/PC era. This 2019 draft will definitely top the 2012 class. The Seahawks have added three receivers in this draft. I think there is an excellent chance all three will make the team. Rumor has it that Russell Russell is still given every one high fives. Especially with all his new toys to play with. The key is going to be: can we keep these guys healthy?

  32. charlietheunicorn says:

    “While DK Metcalf was the clear standout of Seahawks rookie minicamp, other receivers also made strong impressions. UDFA Terry Wright (Purdue) plus tryout guys Floyd Allen (Ole Miss) and Nyqwan Murray (Florida State) were among them. Allen, a college teammate of Metcalf, hauled in a deep ball for a touchdown Sunday and celebrated with a somersault-backflip (he stuck the landing).”
    ~ Brady Henderson (ESPN)

    Have any of you guys worked up the 3 guys mentioned specifically by PC today?

    • WALL UP says:

      Keep an eye on Wright. Formerly, he was just running track, with limited experience playing the slot and wideout as a receiver. But you can’t coach 4.3 speed. You either have it, or you don’t. He does. He’s just learning to be a receiver.

    • GoHawksDani says:

      Ohh yeah, I like Allen based on this video:
      https://twitter.com/BradyHenderson/status/1124488216604581888
      Second guy in the drill. Obviously smaller guy than others, but all the other WRs seem like doing the drill in slow-mo compared to him.
      Height: 5-9 3/4
      Weight: 204
      Bench: 15
      Vert: 34.5
      Broad: 9-9
      40: 4.52
      3cone: 7.69
      20 yard: 4.27
      60 yard: 11.82

      Didn’t played much so a long shot and the 3cone is a bit slow. He’s pretty similar to Ursua

  33. millhouse-serbia says:

    Jim Nagy praised a lot Juan Thornhill on twitter so I aksed him why seahawks liked Blair over him…and here is his answer:

    “Marquise plays faster and he will light you up. Seahawks defense is predicated on playing fast and physical and Blair does both those thing at high level. Hard to find those guys.”

  34. charlietheunicorn says:

    RB Travis Homer

    He caught the ball well out of the backfield during rookie camp. This is not something he was asked to do in CFB, but appeared to move well and understand where he needed to go based on the defense he was going against. He understood pass blocking assignments that he was given and looked good according to PC. I’m pretty much saying CJ Prosise is going to get replaced by this guy.

    There are 7 RBs on the roster right now (no FB listed however):
    1st: Carson / 2nd: Penny / 3rd: Scarbrough / 4th: Homer / 5th McKissic**
    Outside looking in:
    1st Prosise / 2nd Choice

  35. GoHawksDani says:

    Worth checking this video about DK:
    https://twitter.com/DrKJMurray/status/1124663843924447232

    Pretty solid movement imo. He won’t be as quick as Lockett, because of his build, but he’s not slow or anti-agile either

    • cha says:

      Nice article on Metcalf’s off-season training

      https://www.thenewstribune.com/sports/nfl/seattle-seahawks/article230060124.html

      Money quote:

      “At one point during Friday’s drills rookie tryout cornerback Dejuan Neal, four inches shorter and 40 pounds lighter, lined up man to man directly across the line from Metcalf. Neal was so concerned about getting burned deep by Metcalf he turned his shoulders left, began running back toward his own goal line and went from head up to 4 yards ahead of Metcalf.

      That all happened before the ball was even snapped. And Metcalf still beat the bailing cornerback, plus the safety, on a deep post route. He blew by them like they were fence posts, splitting both of them 50 yards down the field.”

      Yes, yes, rookie practice, no tackling, blah blah blah. All the same I’m excited!

      • Rob Staton says:

        Be excited. Metcalf has incredible potential. This is the time to be excited — months before the season begins.

      • GoHawksDani says:

        Be excited, but keep your expectations at check. I think DK is a unique physical specimen, but I fear his drops were not because his hands, but because there is too much pressure on him (by father, media, team, coaches, etc), so he wants to stand up to it, and that is why he has concentration drops. It’s just a theory, but because he can make special catches and has all the tools I guess it’s a mental thing for him. As a rookie with a ton of added pressure (media, PC, fans) I fear he might have a ton of those in his first year. Once he settled I think he’ll do really good tho

  36. Logan Lynch says:

    I’m very excited for most of this draft class in a way I haven’t been since the 2012 era. Watched all of the rookie pressers…I think they got a few BAMFs in this draft with Collier, Blair, Metcalf leading the charge there for me. Amadi has a great personality, I could see him becoming a fan favorite. Really enjoyed Barton’s interview too. Seems like a very smart, cerebral player…I can see why they liked him. Same with BBK.

    I think back on JS talking about narrowing their board and not making excuses for players. That seems to really shine through this year. It’s easy to see why they picked each of these guys and they all seem like “Seahawks” at first glance.

  37. Volume12 says:

    Let’s see how long the XFL lasts on ESPN/ABC and FOX.

    ‘Reimagine Football’

    Should reimagine your fed first and foremost.

    • charlietheunicorn says:

      The AAF should have stayed on free TV. It would have been fine, but instead they had a convoluted schedule and made it very difficult to follow….. I mean, what else is there to watch during the winter/spring. Hockey and Basketball.

  38. Kyle says:

    Floyd Allen, from ol miss who was at rookie camp has an incredible backstory. Watch this video on him. I’m now rooting for him big time. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7FJvJYun-I4

  39. ivotuk says:

    Brandon Stokley type maybe? He was great at find the open spot.