Updated mock draft: 5th January 2015

January 5th, 2015 | Written by Rob Staton

Oklahoma’s Jordan Phillips could see his stock sky rocket

#1 Tampa Bay Buccaneers — Marcus Mariota (QB, Oregon)
This pick looks like a formality. A total no-brainer. The Buccs need to appoint a creative and open minded offensive coordinator who won’t try to turn Mariota into a pure pocket passer. He didn’t play particularly well in the Rose Bowl but he should flourish against Ohio State in the title game.

#2 Tennessee Titans — Randy Gregory (OLB, Nebraska)
The Titans appointed Ray Horton as defensive coordinator and handed him a unit devoid of any players that fit his scheme. Jameis Winston is not the man to lead this tired looking roster. Build the defense and invest in Horton. They have to become tougher to beat.

#3 Jacksonville Jaguars — Dante Fowler Jr (DE, Florida)
Fowler is a maestro. You can line him up anywhere — outside linebacker, defensive end — even inside on third down. He will make plays. A tremendous athlete and playmaker, he’d be a legit candidate to be defensive rookie of the year in 2015. Simply put — a fantastic talent.

#4 Oakland Raiders — Andrus Peat (T, Stanford)
Peat has no peer in this class in terms of pass protection. He’s a natural with ideal length. Technique-wise he can make improvements, but he has the upside to quickly establish himself as one of the premier tackles in the NFL. Oakland has a boat-load of needs but protecting Derek Carr for the duration of his career is a good place to start.

#5 Washington Redskins — Landon Collins (S, Alabama)
He impacts games and when he turns up at the combine, he’ll be one of the winners. At 6-0 and 212lbs expect a lightning performance. He covers well despite his build, he’s instinctive. Collins can be a tone-setter for a secondary that is badly lacking talent.

#6 New York Jets — Shane Ray (DE, Missouri)
They can ill-afford another gaffe at quarterback. They have a talented defense but lack a pure edge rusher and any kind of talent in the secondary. Jameis Winston playing in New York doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.

#7 Chicago Bears — Leonard Williams (DE, USC)
I’m not as crazy about Williams as some others. He sounds better than the tape suggests. He’s mastered the J.J. Watt ‘swat the ball’ act but he’s not a brilliant edge rusher. What is his position at the next level? Still, the upside is there. Someone will take a punt.

#8 Atlanta Falcons — Bud Dupree (OLB, Kentucky)
A leader who flies around the field — he can play defensive end or outside linebacker. The Falcons lack toughness, speed and playmakers on defense. Dupree ticks every box. Few players were more fun to watch in 2014. He makes plays in a variety of ways.

#9 New York Giants — Eddie Goldman (DT, Florida State)
He didn’t have an impact against Oregon but was he 100%? He has every opportunity to establish himself as a premier inside rusher and run stopper. Goldman looks every bit a former 5-star recruit in terms of size and athleticism. Overall he had a great 2014.

#10 St. Louis Rams — T.J. Clemmings (T, Pittsburgh)
The Rams are a quarterback away from relevance but I’m not sure even Jeff Fisher will be prepared to put his franchise in the hands of Jameis Winston. Look for them to give Sam Bradford one last shot on a modest salary and add a quarterback later on. Clemmings has a ton of upside — the type of player Les Snead and Fisher have gone after.

#11 Minnesota Vikings — Amari Cooper (WR, Alabama)
He’s shown he has the deep speed this year to make up for a lack of elite size. He’s the most naturally gifted receiver to enter the draft since A.J. Green. Very focused individual and not a diva. Pairing Cooper with Teddy Bridgewater seems like a smart move.

#12 Cleveland Browns — Jordan Phillips (DT, Oklahoma)
When Phillips rocks up at the combine and runs a 4.8-4.9 he’ll start to fly up the boards. He has better tape than Dontari Poe but has the same kind of rare size and speed. He’s had some injury history and that’ll need to be checked out. If he’s cleared — watch out for Phillips. He declared for a reason.

#13 New Orleans — La’el Collins (G, LSU)
The Saints rely so much on their guards to protect Drew Brees. It’s the way it’s always been in New Orleans with that quarterback. They’re likely to make some cost savings with the current starters and Collins is an absolute beast.

#14 Miami Dolphins — Malcolm Brown (DT, Texas)
A stud. Anyone who needed convincing just has to look at the way he took on Arkansas’ massive offensive line. He kept making plays. Another former 5-star recruit who appears destined for stardom. Like Goldman he should impress at the combine.

#15 San Francisco 49ers — Devante Parker (WR, Louisville)
I think he’ll measure out at 6-2/6-3 and around 205lbs which isn’t huge — but he plays big. The Niners should move on from Michael Crabtree and Anquan Boldin won’t last forever. They need more talent on offense, especially with the Frank Gore era drawing to a close.

#16 Houston Texans — Melvin Gordon (RB, Wisconsin)
It’s not their biggest need of course but Gordon isn’t going to last long in round one. Plenty of teams are going to fall for his combination of suddenness, a fluid running style and gym-rat mentality. It’s just a matter of how early he’ll go.

#17 San Diego Chargers — Ereck Flowers (T, Miami)
Having revealed D.J. Fluker will be switching to guard, San Diego desperately needs to add a quality tackle. Flowers looks the part and could be the next best pass protector after Andrus Peat. This franchise only goes as far as Philip Rivers allows, so they must protect him.

#18 Kansas City Chiefs — Kevin White (WR, West Virginia)
No touchdowns for a receiver all year only tells half the story. Look who they’re starting. It’s hardly a shock. Alex Smith is such a limited passing quarterback you need to put weapons around him. White will compete in the air, run after the catch and make plays downfield.

#19 Cleveland Browns — Vic Beasley (DE, Clemson)
A lack of size might be a hindrance although he should run a good forty time and ten yard split. Beasley has been ultra-productive at Clemson and could end up replacing key free agent Jabaal Sheard.

#20 Philadelphia Eagles — Jameis Winston (QB, Florida State)
Eventually someone will pull the trigger — and it’s likely to be an offensive mind that DNGAF. Chip Kelly clearly backs himself to fit any kind of quarterback into his scheme. The Eagles can afford to roll the dice — Kelly and not Winston would remain the focal identity. They also won 10 games with Foles/Sanchez, they wouldn’t be giving Winston the keys. This is the franchise that gave Michael Vick his second chance.

#21 Cincinnati Bengals — Cedric Ogbuehi (T, Texas A&M)
The Bengals regularly take a chance on players who just dip a little bit. Ogbuehi didn’t have a great 2014 but with the right guidance he can make it work. There are questions about his preparation and work ethic — Cincy are always willing to take on a lost-soul project.

#22 Pittsburgh Steelers — Brandon Scherff (T, Iowa)
The guy just looks like a Steeler — and it’s more than just the Iowa uniforms. Lunch-pail worker who drives people off the ball in the running game. Right tackle is a huge need for Pittsburgh and Scherff would be a day one starter.

#23 Detroit Lions — Cameron Erving (C, Florida State)
He looked good at tackle last season — and looked even better at center in 2014. The Lions would get a player who can start immediately at center and back up every other position on the O-line. He’s a defensive line convert with massive potential.

#24 Arizona Cardinals — Todd Gurley (RB, Georgia)
A likely top ten pick without his ACL injury setback, Gurley could still be a top-20 selection. If he falls, a good team will get lucky. The Cardinals need a feature runner with size and are good enough to let Gurley take his time, fully recover and explode in the NFL.

#25 Carolina Panthers — Trae Waynes (CB, Michigan State)
It’s a bad class of corners but even so — it’d be a shock to see none selected in the first round. Waynes is being touted to have a terrific combine performance and at 6-1/182lbs he could be the one and only cornerback taken in the first frame.

#26 Baltimore Ravens — Tevin Coleman (RB, Indiana)
As well as Justin Forsett has played, you’d have to expect the Ravens to draft a running back this year. Coleman might not work out at the combine due to injury, but he’s shown enough on tape to warrant a top-40 grade.

#27 Indianapolis Colts — Taylor Decker (T, Ohio State)
There’s talk he could declare against the odds. Indy can upgrade both tackle spots and Decker has the size and athleticism to work his way into round one. Keep an eye on this guy.

#28 Dallas Cowboys — Eli Harold (DE, Virginia)
Harold’s speed is a joy to behold at times, but he also has a lot of average tape to counter some of the hype. He’s a determined individual and should be a leader even early in his career. Dallas needs all the talent it can find on defense.

#29 Green Bay Packers — Bendarick McKinney (LB, Mississippi State)
Big, physical 3-4 inside linebacker who made Miss State’s defense tick. Could be the player Rolando McClain should’ve been. Very solid prospect for any club looking for a presence on defense. He’ll move around at his size.

#30 New England Patriots — Devin Smith (WR, Ohio State)
Sparky, athletic playmaker who makes chunk plays. Always competitive. Has a little Odell Beckham Jr to his game. He’d offer something the Patriots don’t have on offense and he’d be a great compliment to Gronk and co. Smith averages an incredible 27.7 YPC.

#31 Denver Broncos — Shaq Thompson (LB, Washington)
The last couple of Washington games I watched forced me to temper expectations for Thompson. He’s athletic, he has major upside potential. But linebackers like this haven’t traditionally gone in the top fifteen. He’s certainly not Ryan Shazier.

And that brings us to Seattle.

I hate putting the Seahawks at #32 and dodged it throughout last year. For the purpose of this mock, however, it seems perfectly acceptable. I won’t be making a single selection. I want to run through the remaining options and get your thoughts. And the best way to do that is to have no other team picking after Seattle.

Let’s group some of the remaining prospects by position and need (and yes, it’s way too early to have any clear idea on whether this is a remotely realistic looking first round). Some potential draft targets are already off the board.

Running back
If the Seahawks lose Marshawn Lynch this has to at least be considered as a possible early draft target. The top three prospects are off the board and I have a hard time imagining Seattle going after Alabama’s T.J. Yeldon. In fact, the increased opportunities for Robert Turbin and Christine Michael could even be a trial run for 2015. Let’s not forget, when Ian Rapoport was touting interest in Melvin Gordon, the Seahawks were 3-3 and staring at a possible mid-first round pick. Now they can’t pick any earlier than 28th in round one. Gordon and Todd Gurley (even with his injury) could be long gone. Are you ready for the Turbin & Michael era? There’s enough depth to add a third wheel later on if there’s no shot at the top two prospects.

Wide receiver
I’m not a huge fan of Arizona State’s Jaelen Strong and don’t see him as a first round prospect. I think he’ll measure smaller than expected, I think he’s a modest athlete and he’s best suited to a Terrance Williams-style role on a prolific passing offense. Sammie Coates has the difference making athleticism Seattle loves but he’s not had the consistent production they also appreciate. He’s had some tough games. For every downfield bomb there’s a drop. He’s had injuries. He has the upside that is definitely worth considering — just not necessarily in round one. The options aren’t great for Seattle when it comes to this position as a first round choice, especially with Duke Williams staying at Auburn.

Tight end
There are a couple of intriguing players to monitor here. We’ve talked a lot about Maxx Williams — a player who blocks well, doesn’t have bad snaps and is as tough as they come at the position. He’s also shown a playmaking flash, he was Minnesota’s top receiving option in a run-based offense and crucially in terms of Seattle — he made the most of his limited targets. He could replace Zach Miller for the long haul and he only turns 21 at draft time. Would they go big on a Miller replacement? They did give him a five-year $34 million deal ($17 million guaranteed). At the time they also needed to bolster a weak roster and Miller understood Tom Cable’s system. I suspect Seattle will like Williams unless he’s a really mediocre athlete at the combine — but round one might be a bit rich for their tastes. We’ll see. The other player is Devin Funchess at Michigan. He has the size they badly lack in a receiver or tight end (6-5, 235lbs). The concern is he totally underwhelmed in college and needed pushing every step of the way. He turned it on for the Ohio State game at the end of the season — where was that type of performance earlier in the year? I’m not convinced he’s ‘Seahawky’ enough in terms of his attitude. But how can you not be intrigued by that size? Especially given Seattle’s redzone struggles. He wouldn’t be a blocker — he’d be a flex tight end/receiver.

Defensive line
A lot of the better options are gone here. I’m a huge fan of Missouri’s Markus Golden. He doesn’t have the length but he has the athleticism, attitude, competitive nature and production. I’d love to think he could be an option here, adding to the rotation for the next few years. I think it’d be too early for a prospect like Washington’s Hau’Oli Kikaha or Mississippi State’s Preston Smith. As noted earlier in the week — I think Danny Shelton is overrated and wouldn’t expect the Seahawks to show interest here. Locking up Cliff Avril was key and maybe limits the early round need here. Think of how well this D-line has played recently, then add a healthy Brandon Mebane and Cassius Marsh into the mix.

Offensive line
Seattle has already invested two first round picks, a second round pick and a third round pick on the O-line in the Carroll/Schneider era. I think if they were going to go down this route again it would mean James Carpenter departing and Justin Britt moving inside. I’m not totally convinced they’d want to move Britt after one year — but they did it to Carpenter. South Carolina’s Corey Robinson is a massive 6-7 and 335lbs with ideal length — but he’s said to have bad work habits. Oklahoma’s Daryl Williams has shown some skill as a run blocker and also has long arms to match a 6-5, 330lbs frame. I wasn’t blown away watching Colorado State’s Ty Sambrailo but he’s from an athletic family and has the size Seattle loves (6-7, 310lbs). I’m not sold on Oregon’s Jake Fisher as a first rounder — or Sambrailo for that matter — and this could be an area they wait on. Of course, they could just keep Britt at tackle, re-sign Carpenter or even start Alvin Bailey.

Remember, at the heart of everything is where can Seattle best upgrade their roster? That’s how they set up their draft board. The defense is remarkably well set for now and will be difficult to upgrade. On offense, they can make obvious improvements — especially if the likes of Lynch and Miller are no longer with the team. They’ve already lost Percy Harvin — their best X-factor playmaker at receiver. Then there’s the potential of changes to the offensive line.

Discussing possible draft picks for Seattle is about more than just SPARQ. It’s a combination of factors — including mainly film assessment, production, character and that all important roster upgrade. So you’re on the clock.

Who should we be talking about here?

208 Responses to “Updated mock draft: 5th January 2015”

  1. HACK6 says:

    Just interested as to why you think Amari Cooper will not be drafted till Number 11 rob? Most of the Media have him as a top-5 pick and wondering why you dont? Not that I am disputing it just enquiring

    • Rob Staton says:

      Lacks true #1 size. Not as explosive as Odell Beckham Jr last year who went at #11.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      One thing the media will often do, is to inflate the stock of players at a position that isn’t as strong. It’s not a weak year at WR, but in comparison to last year it’s much less deep and also lacks the first round punch (no big man dominaters like Mike Evans).

      Because of this it’s making Amari Cooper look pretty good in comparison to the rest of the field. I think he’ll go before pick #10 personally (assuming a good/fast combine), but most of that is because of looking at the teams in the top 10 and their needs. Lots of them could use a true #1 (I’m looking at you, Oakland Raiders!).

  2. rowdy says:

    I watched Devin smith in his bowl game after you talked about him and he looked good. Then I seen him throw up the Jonny football money sign now i wouldnt touch him lol. I see them trading down more then anything unless it’s oline. They always seem to reach for oline but I think we resign carp and don’t go that direction round 1. If I had to pick one at this point it would probably be DGB.

  3. Turp says:

    Have to think they would trade down at this point, but if not, I would go with Markus Golden. There is always room for a talented pass rusher. Maxx Williams would be a stretch but makes sense if you free up some cap space but cutting Miller.

    • Belgaron says:

      With 4 comp picks coming, you have to wonder if they’ll feel good enough on quantity to stand pat or even consider trading up (yes, I know they can’t trade comp picks but they could trade their regular picks). If Jets new GM keeps Harvin, they pick up a 4th, if not they essentially pick up a replacement 6th from the Jets for the one they sent to Indy for Burley.

      • Beanhawk says:

        And probably 25 picks higher than the Burley pick would have been.

      • TwistedChopper says:

        I really don’t see anybody on the board that they would be able to trade up to get without giving up too much other compensation. I can only envision them trading up if the guy they were targeting was only a few spots away (with no other good backup options) and the price was very reasonable (like moving up 2 spots in the 1st and only having to give up a 7 type of thing).

        • Belgaron says:

          Probably not in the high end of the draft. Last time they traded up was to draft both Jesse Williams and Tharold Simons in the 5th round. Maybe they would move up in the 4th or 3rd.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      I don’t think the Seahawks really think that way honestly. I think they are always thinking about it from a competition standpoint. If they believe that Maxx Williams could compete for a starting spot and win it from Zack Miller then they would draft him. If not, even the money savings would be enough reason to do it.

  4. brian says:

    Dorial Green-Beckham could be an option if he is still on the board. Top tier talent – but serious red flags and has been out of football (not eligible to play but at Oklahoma) for a year.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      I think it’s pretty unlikely that he is going to go pro. His stock has bottomed out at this point. If he comes back with a good year at Oklahoma he’d leap back into top prospect conversation. From a money standpoint (and basically any logical standpoint you can think of) DBG will do himself a lot of good going back to school for another year.

      • TwistedChopper says:

        Ok, I just now saw the tweet that he declared. Doesn’t seem that official, but I guess it’s the best we have to go off of. If he is coming out, there is absolutely no way I’d spend my 1st round pick on him. Yes there is lots of upside, but can we be sure that he’d even be able to make the 53 team roster his rookie year?

  5. dave crockett says:

    If the board falls the way you have it Seattle basically has to trade back.

    If he declares Seattle has to go Dorial Green-Beckham. I’d have thought it highly unlikely for him to declare, but it looks like some staff shakeups at OU will make it more likely. He’s probably not a year 1 upgrade.

  6. Rob Staton says:

    In this projection I didn’t have Dorial Green-Beckham declaring. To be honest, if the character checks out enough for Seattle to take him at the back end of round one, someone else will take him much earlier.

    • redzone086 says:

      What about trade options that upgrade the roster with only the 1st rd pick being used?

    • rowdy says:

      I thought that might be the case when I didn’t see him on the list

    • TwistedChopper says:

      Great point. He’s either a top 10 prospect or a day 3 prospect. Basically either you think his talent will make him a superstar or his character will make him never play a down in the NFL.

  7. bmasterson says:

    Based on who they are locking up now, I could definitely see them leaning offense. And yet there are arguments against them drafting at any major position other than RB.

    Everyone is going to jump on the idea of a offensive lineman, but people forget they have a lot invested there. Only Sweezy is lower than a second round player. Carpenter is on his last year, but I have a hard time seeing them invest in a first round guard replacement.

    Tight end doesn’t become a critical need until next year, when Miller, Helfet, and I think McCoy are all FAs. They might look for a project TE, but in what’s being called a poor draft class, do they want to possibly overpay for one?

    They still need to find a replacement for Harvin, but unless you actually count Harvin; Carroll/Schneider has yet to draft a WR in the first round. Certainly doesn’t mean that they won’t but Seattle is a run first team.

    This year looks to be as unpredictable as any. Should be a fun filled May.

    • Belgaron says:

      I would see any improvement to the O-line that would give Wilson more time/less hits as a big plus for the offense. Those three pro bowlers made a big difference for Dallas this year and if Okung, Unger, and Sweezy remain healthy next year, Seahawks could match that. But that is a big if at this point, they need backups for those guys that will be potential starters down the road. A big improvement in year two from Britt would be nice. Carp could be back and improve as well. I think they want to see what the market offers him before they make an offer, assuming they do. I could see him back and improving as well.

      I agree on the need for a young Miller-esque TE. Willson is great at Joker assuming he stops dropping catchable balls.

      I’m not convinced they need a “replacement” for Harvin. They’ll definitely bring in a few guys to compete, which always helps one way or another.

      • TwistedChopper says:

        I’m not sure I want a Miller-esque TE, well at least not with a high draft pick. Blocking TE’s can be found later in the draft. All the guys who go early are super athletes who are bigtime threats in the passing game and especially the red zone. Ebron was that guy last year and he’s still pretty unproven (had games where he was totally absent). Willson is somewhere in the middle as an above average athlete, moderate threat in the passing game and average blocker. I see the team looking for somebody whose really special in one area (not Maxx Williams) such as the next Julius Thomas (a guy they showed a lot of interest in).

        • Belgaron says:

          Agreed. Later for a blocking TE, maybe look to convert a tall WR, small OT, or defender to the role.

  8. LadyT says:

    Are there any OGs that grade out well worth taking at the end of the 1st? In past drafts some of the better OGs are there, just curious.

    • Rob Staton says:

      No — and to be honest I just can’t see this team drafting a pure guard in round one unless they were really special.

      • Belgaron says:

        Any Ts that could be converted to LG?

        • TwistedChopper says:

          I don’t think you draft T’s with the plan to convert them to LG. Tackles naturally get selected higher in the draft, so I’m not sure why you’d draft a worth tackle with the plan to covert him to a guard. A guy like Bitonio was a bit different because most saw him as undersized and not a good option at tackle in the league which really lowered his stock. However, he was athletic enough to be an option at basically any spot on the line which upped his draft stock.

          • Volume 12 says:

            Not so sure about that, twistedchopper.

            In Ron Wolf’s auto-biography, who GMs Ted Thompson, John Dorsey, and our very own John Schneider learned the ropes from, there’s an interesting philosophy regarding the drafting of OL. It says something like ‘always try to draft LTs and then worry about where you plug them in it, because they’re the most athletic of all the OL position’s.’

            • TwistedChopper says:

              I see what you are getting at, but the fact of the matter is LT is a premium position in the league and thus gets drafted really high. True LT’s are few and the legit ones go in the top 15.

              Carpenter, Moffitt, and Britt are all Definitely not “LT converts”, so it doesn’t really look like Tom Cable (who I’m sure has most of the say in OL, not Schneider) uses that Wolf mantra.

              If you want to covert a guy you can’t overdraft him because who knows how well they’ll do with a position change. So if we draft a guy a tackle to move them to the middle right away, you can bet that it’ll be a lesser known late round tackle who has decent SPARQ and iffy tape.

        • Rob Staton says:

          La’el Collins will surely switch to guard. Scherff could make the switch.

  9. bmasterson says:

    One thing I could see them doing is leveraging their extra compensatory picks and possibly trading up a few for a running back. I know its against the grain, because they value their picks so highly.

    And yet, especially if Marshawn decides to retire, they have to find a suitable replacement. Physically Marshawn does seem like he’s having more trouble playing a full game. If they win another Superbowl he might just decide to end on a good note.

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      I’d be ok with SEA reaching for Gurley, but not at too high a price.

      I think Rob is spot on (at least as much as one can be this far in advance) with ARI looking to fix their RB woes by taking Gurley. They might go WR if Fitz leaves and someone like Parker or White are still available. Otherwise, they need a running game in the worst way.

      Even with his injury, Gurley’s just too good a prospect to pass on. If there’s a reasonable shot at him, I hope SEA takes it.

      • Cameron says:

        It makes sense for us to sit back, and seeing how pathetic the Cards run game is, mock them a RB in the first round. Thing is, what makes us think Bruce Arians is going to have a coming to Jesus moment and realize he needs to invest in a RB? I don’t see it. Arians believes in passing the football, and when that doesn’t work passing it some more.

        They’ve mostly spent late round picks at that position, and I expect them to continue that trend, and good for us, because Gurley on any team in our division scares the living daylights out of me.

        On this same vein, has Bill Bilicheck ever spent a 1st rounder on a WR? I don’t think they have, and I would be shocked to see them start now.

        Devin Smith then might be available, and an option at 32.

        • bmasterson says:

          The thing with Gurley is you could end up with a Peterson like recovery or it could end up like Marcus Lattimore.

          • Drew says:

            Marcus Lattimore’s injury was much different. He completely tore his knee for the 2nd time. Gurley just tore his ACL only. Lattimore did come back to play after his first ACL injury and was playing at a high level again before he re-injured it.

        • Ho Lee Chit says:

          The standard recovery time for an ACL is 7-9 months. Gurley injured his in late November. That puts him at 8 months at the start of training camp in late July. His injury is not as severe as Lattimore’s, so I expect him to make a good recovery. Still the knee is usually stronger the second year and it is wise to give him a red shirt year in 2015. I doubt Arizona will do that since they need a RB badly and now. Seattle could red shirt him behind Lynch who still has one more contract year. Arizona could go for Ajayi in round two and feel good about it.

          • CHawk Talker Eric says:

            Latt tore ligaments in both knees.

            Cameron has a point about Arians’ focus on the passing game and history of leaving HB picks to the later rounds.

          • CD says:

            Seattle could red shift him behind Lynch who still has one more contract year…

            That is fine on paper, but I see a mess of a situation. Can you imagine the noise if Lynch is still on the roster and the Hawks take a RB at #1? Lynch will know that that means (no further contract with the Hawks after his last year) and I am guessing he won’t be too happy about it, nor will most of his teammates.

            If the Hawks take a RB in the 1st so late in Lynch’s career and contract, they need to deal him beforehand or else it will become a circus. I don’t see this (trading him) happening because the Hawks at 32 wouldn’t be assured their RB of choice would be there at the end of the 1st round (or within realistic reach with a trade up).

            If they do trade him (and deal with the outcry from fans), then I think they would go Turbo/CM next year with maybe a mid pick on a RB. Spending a 1st while still having Turbo/CM would seem like a lot of capital to invest when CM is still a bit of an unknown.

            Sure the Hawks got Harvin (with his proven NFL difference maker rep) in Tate’s final year, but the O didn’t revolve around Tate. While Tate was ‘one of their own’ and they didn’t take care of him, he wasn’t the heart and soul of the team/fan base.

            This a business so anything can happen, but to me a RB is not realistic for the 1st round.

            • Radman says:

              Especially not on a RB who can’t even play for the first year. I just can’t see it. Gurley is a nice prospect. But if they spend a first round pick on a RB who can’t even play for the first year (likely), I’ll be disappointed. We put up with a lot of terrible pass blocking for the sake of Cable’s system that, supposedly, can make a 1200 yard rusher out of a run of the mill RB. There’s no reason to invest a first round pick in an injured RB who has proven nothing in the NFL when we’ve already invested so heavily in a running system that should produce a lot on its own.

      • TwistedChopper says:

        Great point. I think something not mentioned a lot is how bad of a year Ellington was having BEFORE he got injured. All his big play ability seen in previous years was basically non existant. Hard to say where exactly to place this blame, but at 3.3 YPC (on 200 carries) is enough to say that he wasn’t efficient.

        I honestly have no idea how the Cards were 9-1 at one point this year. I think I read somewhere that they were statistically the luckiest team in the history (in terms of performance vs record) of the league 10 games in.

    • KyleT says:

      You cannot trade comp picks

      • Mark says:

        No, but trading the ‘normal’ picks would be less painful with a pocket full of comp picks. I think that’s what OP is implying.

    • Meat says:

      The compensatory picks cannot be utilized in a trade, but they could use the regular picks.
      I would like a trade up if it doesn’t cost them much because Gurley falls. Keep Lynch and redshirt Gurley.

      A trade down is plausible in this scenario too.

  10. JaviOsullivan says:

    Markus Golden, Nate Orchard, Jake Fisher, Ty Sambrailo, Arik Armstead, Lorenzo Mauldin may be interesting options at #32

  11. Ealafa says:

    If we stay put I would take DGB. If he declares. Otherwise I would drop into the second round and tried to ,target first; Sammie Coates .Then Maxx Williams than ,Markus Golden or Nate Orchard .

    second round target Jay Ajayi,

  12. Clayton says:

    I think Jalen Collins, CB, LSU should be considered, especially if Byron Maxwell gets picked up. Rumor is that he most consistently shut down Odell Beckham in practice. But in terms of making improvements to the roster, I think the offensive line is glaringly the team’s worst unit. The question is whether the eighth best OT (if the draft goes like this) will be a roster improvement.

  13. CHawk Talker Eric says:

    Ever since Rob highlighted Williams, I’ve have this niggling feeling that if Mad Maxx displays enough athleticism at the Combine, JSPC will trade down and take him in the bottom of R2.

    Consider this: Miller is (was?) an important enough part of the offense for SEA to tie up a significant amount of cap space in him. Imagine our offense with a healthy Miller in the line up every week. From strong run blocking (especially at the 2nd level) to sure hands, Miller did it all, maybe not the best in the League, but as good as this team needed. When he’s on the field, Miller is rock solid. Problem is, he can’t stay healthy and he costs a lot.

    The closer I look at Williams, the more I see Miller’s replacement. This kid is rock solid at every facet of his position, as well as a footballer in general. Imagine a 21 yo Williams developing with SEA’s offense over the course of the next 10 seasons.

    It’s way too early to read the tea leaves just yet, but I can’t shake this feeling.

    • redzone086 says:

      Me too.

    • Ben2 says:

      Yep. I reserve the right to discover more prospects as the process goes on, but I like Maxx Williams in this scenario too. We’ve missed Millers’s skillset… That clutch 3rd down catch….

    • TwistedChopper says:

      I think the amount of money we tied up in Miller on his first contract here was more out of desperation than his overall importance to the system and his overall skill. The 2009 Seahawks had just about the worst roster in football, and Pete Carroll and John Schnieder needed to flip that overnight. Part of this was to overpay to get some impact players that would instantly improve our team (Miller and Rice come to mind).

  14. Cameron says:

    Yup, I’d look to trade back and get more mid round picks, then package some of those to move back into round 2 a third time with the goal of drafting 3 times in the 40-64 range. Then target a TE, RB and best DT or DE.

  15. AlaskaHawk says:

    I don’t really get this trade back talk that goes on every year. We already got 11 picks. And when we say that someone isn’t worth a first round pick, if we don’t pick again till #64 then they are a second round pick. Last years move back wasn’t that helpful and probably landed us weaker players. Just pull the trigger and quite trying to pick up loose change.

    So where I see room for improvement, linebacker makes a lot of tackles and can fill in when another lb is injured. Defensive line, best player available. Offensive line, I don’t care how many first round players were picked they are still the worst part of the team, speedy /kick returner. We still need a big third down wide receiver or tight end. We should give a few mid to late round running backs a shot, especially if Lynch leaves.

    • redzone086 says:

      I agree. Really we are using the first pick in the second round. Just take who is on your board and stop with the value guesses. Cute leaves room.for.error.

      • rowdy says:

        They said last year prich would of been there pick, then they traded down twice and still got him

        • AlaskaHawk says:

          There were other choices like Bitonio as tackle that we could have made. Or a strong handed receiver for red zone instead of small and quick, which we have already.

          • Ben2 says:

            Yeah, there were other choices we COULD have made but PC & JS make the decision and they said they wanted PRich.

            • Coug1990 says:

              Yep. Richardson was the player that John and Pete said they wanted. Plus, at this point are we really questioning them?

              Acquiring more picks has worked for them. Why would anyone want them to change that?

              • TwistedChopper says:

                Exactly my point. I think something else that people need to realize is that not all players you draft will work out regardless of how good the Coach/GM combination is. Seahawks have missed pretty often lately it seems. However, one surefire way to improve your odds is to increase your number of tickets. If you have 13 draft picks, but only 8 “open” spots on the roster this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It means that there will be a great competition for those spots and the best players for your team will get those spots.

                Something the Seahawks desperately need as well is better depth (pretty apparently drop this year compared to last year although injuries played a role). Why not improve that depth with a whole bunch of young guys coming in and fighting for spots with other fringe vets.

                • AlaskaHawk says:

                  Statistically speaking the higher you pick the greater their chance of long term success. I do agree that having more picks helps too. But we got 11 so why trade down?

    • TwistedChopper says:

      Our punt return game has been atrocious this year. Well, basically our special teams in general have taken a big step back (Haushka probably being only a slight step back). Although I doubt we address this specifically in the the draft, I see any prospect who is a plus on special teams will get a bigger boost up the big board this year than in years past.

  16. Donald says:

    I agree AlaskaHawk, don’t trade down. We have enough depth, what they need is an impact player that makes a difference. Especially if they are looking to replace Lynch. Trade up for Gurley, or use #32 for Funchess. Funchess will be better with time.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      Our depth actually isn’t that great (well, relatively compared to last years Seahawk team). There have been multiple points this year where we have had to sign guys off the street to fill in for injured players. More depth is never a bad thing, in fact it’s a great thing. It’s this great depth that lead to the next man up mentality for Hawk players that allowed guys like Richard Sherman to become super stars.

  17. David M2 says:

    Rob,

    I’m surprised that you only have one CB and one S going in the first round of this draft. Is this draft class really that week in regards to secondary options, or is there just that much depth of talent at other positions?

    • TwistedChopper says:

      Good question, I’d also be interested in hearing Rob’s take on this. What about “Seahawky” corners that are long and tall? Yes, they won’t run the 4.3 times, but last year it seemed teams were copycating a bit and moving the bigger corners up their board.

      • Volume 12 says:

        I’m not Rob by any means, but check out BYU CB Robertson Daniel, Miami, Ohio CB Quinton Rollins, , Texas A&M CB DeShazor Everett, Utah CB Eric Rowe, VA Tech S/CB Detrick Bonner, Ole Miss CB Senquez Gilson.

        My pick for Seattle’s yearly CB selection would be Georgia CB Damian Swann. And a sleeper to keep an eye on is Texas CB Sheroid Evans. Great length and former national track star.

  18. Ho Lee Chit says:

    I will agree AlaskaHawk. On this mock we probably need to move up to #22. I would target Gurley or Erving. We could probably swing a deal with Pittsburg for our #1, 3 and 4 for number 22. If we stay put I would roll the dice on Danny Shelton. We should get compensation picks at the end of rounds 3 and 4 so we would still have picks in those rounds. Pittsburgh would have no problem finding another RT to fit their needs.

    That is a lot of draft capital to give up for Gurley if he cannot play this season. And it’s probably too much for a backup O Linemen, as well. Drafting Gurley may force Marshawn into immediate retirement. Then we could be screwed. If Marshawn plays how motivated would he be? He would want a contract extension before training camp. Taking the injured RB might be a bad move. If he is healthy then … okay. I think we have to plan on playing Gurley if we trade up and draft him.

    • Drew says:

      We would not have to plan on playing Gurley right away even if we don’t have Marshawn. I think that a combination of Turbo and Michael would be able to get the job done for one year if we had to. I’ve been very impressed with how much Turbo has progressed this year.

    • CD says:

      I don’t think Tate will get us a 3rd rounder as it seems draft compensation is based more on the value of the contract signed and not production. His deal (5 yr $31m) wasn’t that big compared to others G Jennings (5 yr at $47m) and M Wallace (5 yr at $60m) who brought in 3rd round comp picks 2 years ago.

      Based on performance, Wallace and Jennings had ”an average year” their first year with Miami and the Vikings, Wallace at 73 rec, 930 yards and 5 TD, Jennings at 68 rec, 804 yards and 4 TD’s.. I said ‘average’ as Wallace finished at 28 in terms of WR yardage in the NFL (2nd on his team), Jennings finished in the 40’s, but again, their former teams received the highest possible comp pick in round 3. No one knows for sure how comp picks are given, but it seems it based more on the value of the deals they signed and not production.

      I hope I am wrong.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      Danny Shelton? Do you watch UW games?

      No offense, but he seems like to opposite of a Seahawk to me. First off he doesn’t really fit into any position on our defensive scheme. At least not unless he lost a ton of weight to where we could move him to like the 5-tech. But why would we want to draft a 5-tech type guy so early? To me I wouldn’t draft him until at least round 4. I just can’t envision him having much positive impact on this team.

  19. Ross says:

    I think it could be anybody, really. With Richardson, the young backs and Norwood on the offensive side, and Marsh, Simon and Hill on the defensive side, plus Avril’s contract and a decent amount of cap space, I don’t see any glaring future problems. Core players are locked up.

    Maybe defensive line? JS can find decent run stuffers in the later rounds or in free agency but how great would it be to lock up a young star like Fowler or Williams and have him learn from maestros like Banger and Bennett. Pass rush is by no means a weakness but it certainly could be stronger. Do I even need to suggest a big receiving target?

    I’m not going to suggest there’s no value in accumulating as many picks as possible, even in a draft where the picks could hit double digits, but the roster is reaching a point of saturation where there’s an increasingly small chance of the late round picks developing fast enough to stick.

    So, why not put them to good use? Go up and get the guys at the top of the board. That might mean the difference between three Super Bowls or two Super Bowls and an early playoff exit.

    • JeffC says:

      Even though Marsh will be coming back, I’d like to see another pass rusher. If Avril got injured, then things get real dicey. There seems to be a backlash against the running/escape qb’s, since everyone is seeing that RW is special and you can’t find guys with his scrambling ability. Heard an analysis on the radio that GM’s are going back to pocket passers, so bring on more pass rushers.

      • Drew says:

        The reason why they’re going for pocket passers is because there are so few accurate QBs that have the scrambling ability like Russell or a few of the other QBs that can move around.

        • peter says:

          And because every scrambling QB insists on diving head first except Russ…..even Cam against Az would be in the clear on a few runs and then extend forward instead of sliding or going out.

    • Matt says:

      I’m not going to suggest there’s no value in accumulating as many picks as possible, even in a draft where the picks could hit double digits, but the roster is reaching a point of saturation where there’s an increasingly small chance of the late round picks developing fast enough to stick.

      Ross- Completely agree. How many players can we “red shirt”? I think we’re going to orchestrate this draft a little differently than in years past, trading down, yes, but also trading up. In this mock Brett Hundley is still available, so we’d do just what we did last year with Bridgewater being there, and JS trades down into the 2nd round. I’d like to see us use our extra capitol to move up in rounds 2-5 and get higher rated prospects. Before the combine I’m not going to guess on who we take early, but some players I like are: WR-Montgomery, Godley, Devante Davis. TE: Williams. RB- Josh Robinson, Artis-Payne, Ajayi. DL-Orchard, Kikaha, Flowers, Armstead, Gabe Wright, Golden OL-Grasu LB-McKinney QB-Petty. CB/WR-Lippet. KR/PR-Lockett.

  20. Steve Nelsen says:

    I love the defensive line depth in this draft and hope the Hawks pick up at least one tackle and one LEO to add to the rotation.

    I’m OK with trading back. The stats show you have a better chance of getting an impact player using more picks than by trading up for an earlier pick. That is the strategy JS has used to build a championship roster so stick with it!

    If the Jets keep Harvin, that gets us another 4th. And I think we are more likely to get 4 comp picks than 3. I also like our chances of getting at least a 4th round comp pick for Golden Tate.

  21. KyleT says:

    With this board, I do think its likely we either draft a OT prospect that will move inside to LG initially, but can compete with Baily to move to left Tackle after Okung’s contract expires. Or we plan to keep Okung around but not extend Irvin which would mean us taking advantage of the deep Edge draft and taking a Leo/SAM prospect. I don’t think there’s a way where we pay both in 2016, assuming we extend Wagner and Wilson. I’ve studied the hell out of the cap and these projections to come to this conclusion based on what is known right now.

    Depending on how prospects grade post combine we may trade down slightly before making our first pick, but it could be a tackle like Donovan Smith/Ty Sambrailo or a Leo/SAM like Hau’oli Kikaha/Nate Orchard.

    I think they would prefer to get an impact full DT if Brown dropped, but there is likely no way that happens. Maxx Williams is certainly an option, but it depends on the combine and if they see him as maybe solving their red zone issues.

    I don’t see them going WR in round 1 or even round 2.

    • Drew says:

      I don’t think it’ll be possible for us to trade down. We were fortunate to trade back last year, I don’t see it happening again this year.

      • Steve Nelsen says:

        Teams used to spurn the idea of trading for the 32nd because you had to pay 1st round rookie money. But, the 5th year option and the rookie salary scale now create some value for that pick – especially if you plan to use it for a project QB.

  22. Ho Lee Chit says:

    Brett Hundley will go in the first round. There are just too many teams in need of a QB and QB’s are the coin of the realm in the NFL . Hundley flashed his running skills in the bowl game against K State. Passing accuracy continues to be a concern but NFL coaching will fix that. He has better off the field leadership skills than Winston. Suitors could include the Jets, Rams, Eagles and Niners. They will not gamble he lasts until their pick in round 2. If he is still on the board at 32, Seattle is in position again to trade back.

    • CC says:

      I could see Hundley going to Philly if Jameis is off the board.

    • JeffC says:

      You can take the Rams and Niners off your list as trade partners. I doubt seattle’s FO will do something to help those teams acquire someone they want.

      Although if they wanted to pay a heavy price for Hundley, I would love to see that, because I think he’s terrible.

      • Ho Lee Chit says:

        How true. The NIners and Rams probably have to bite on Hundley with their pick in round one if they want him. If he falls to 32, Seattle will work a deal to ensure he is off their board when their 2nd round pick comes up.

    • Drew says:

      I doubt he goes in the 1st. Prime examples of picks like that are Geno Smith and EJ Manuel. Only a desperate GM would pull that trigger.

  23. CC says:

    I guess I’d like to hedge my bets today – how does the offense look in the playoffs? I think we know we need some more players that “tilt the field.” Also – do we lose any coaches?

    The good news for the Seahawks is that they have done well drafting defensive guys on day 2 and 3. Last year they arguably were looking at Easley until the Pats took him and so they dropped down and took PRich. We seemed to have a few guys on D that basically redshirted this year.

    A WR at 32 doesn’t seem to fit the Seahawks – DBG is a problem child, and based on the Percy experiment, I doubt he’s the pick. I think they’ll draft a WR in the lower rounds and let them fight it out with Norwood/Lockette/and others.

    OL – as much as I would like to see an OT guy here – again, we have the Carp averageness, Britt averageness – unlikely that OT is in the first round.

    So to me – who could tilt the field for the Seahawks on offense? I’m going with a 6’5″ TE/WR who’ll be 21 around the draft – DEVIN FUNCHESS. While a Zach clone sounds great – I think they have a poor man’s version of that already and they just don’t build Zach type TEs anymore. Seahawks will want to get speed and Funchess allegedly ran a 4.33 40 time – let’s say he runs 4.4 – if NE doesn’t take him – with the 32nd pick, the Super Bowl Champions select Michigan (WR/TE) Devin Funchess.

    • CC says:

      21 years old – in May 2015

      • Cysco says:

        The thing with Funchess is he doesn’t have the production to back up the athleticism. Seattle looks for athleticism but they equally value production. They already have an athletic TE with not the greatest hands. I don’t think Funchess is much, if any, of an upgrade over Wilson.

        If Seattle is going to go TE in round one, I would think they’d go for more of a blocking TE like Maxx.

        • CC says:

          Exactly – I don’t think they need a TE who is a blocker – they need a game changer. I doubt he runs a 4.3 too – but if it is a 4.4 or 4.5 – and has an upside – he’s worth the pick at 32.

          • Volume 12 says:

            They already have a Devin Funnchess on the roster. TE Luke Willson. Same type of guy. Willson is more competitive though.

            • TwistedChopper says:

              I don’t think the comparison between Luke Willson and Devin Funchess is as close as you guys are playing it up to be. Luke did run a 40 time of 4.54 and the have simliar measurables, but just watch the tape of Funchess play. He will actually try to make guys miss in the open field and on occasion go way up to high point a ball.

              Honestly these are traits I’ve never really seen in Willson. He’s a straight line runner and he’s not the type of guy you’d ever run a fade route with (Funchess you would though).

    • Ho Lee Chit says:

      I don’t know where you heard he runs a 4.33. The reports I have read put him at 4.65. That is slower than Luke Willson. Funchess would project to Willson’s spot on the roster not Zack Miller. Reports are he struggles with the deep ball and the easy pass. He is not a strong inline blocker.

  24. Cysco says:

    Regarding trading back, I just can’t see it. There’s a lot of value in that #32 spot because of the extra year of control teams get for 1st round picks. If there’s a player the team likes in the early/mid second, they’d just pull the trigger at the end of the 1st.

    More picks is pretty much the last thing the Seahawks need at this point. They’re looking at 11 picks already? There’s just not enough room for 11 rookies on this roster. Why would they try to get even more picks?

    If anything, this could be the year we see them move up a bit.

    We all know that Seattle drafts/grades based on their team. I have a hard time figuring out who could be upgraded on the defense. (first world problems!)

    On offense, RB is likely the place where a rookie could make an automatic contribution. (I’m assuming Lynch is gone) WR perhaps for the right guy. TE if only there were better options.

    My vote would be to trade our 1st, 3rd and a 5th to move up to #23 and grab their pick of Gurley or Gordon. If not that, I don’t see anyone at 32 who can create an instant impact so I’d go best available and probably look at D-Line. Or I suppose maybe reach and get Maxx Williams.

    • David says:

      Well K-will, McDaniel can be cut to open up cap space for other players to resign, not sure about Dobbs, Jeron Johnson could leave Via FA i believe. It will be interesting how the hawks work this draft but i have feeling they will keep building for the future/present.

      More d-line depth
      another O-line swingman
      CB
      RB possibly
      Safety
      LB’s

      Alot of people are saying they will go WR in the draft early but im not sure. i found it odd they picked two last year ill find it weirder if they pick one this year. i am honestly being pulled two ways haha

    • j says:

      If you trade down, you don’t have to keep the picks. Trade down to the second, and use those picks plus some of our natural ones to trade back into the second round, (i.e. for a third second rounder). If there is no one to love at 32, why not? With our comp. picks we could be looking at multiple picks in each of rounds two through five – JS can do some good work there.

  25. rowdy says:

    Rob, only way Only way I see them going oline would be for a replacement for okung, probably won’t be able to afford him after next year. Who would be the best option to replace him after a redshirt year behind him?

    • Cysco says:

      It appears that Alvin Bailey is being groomed for that role.

      • rowdy says:

        I think that’s out of necessity not preference, Carroll hasn’t sounded to pleased about him either. I was only looking for o linemen to draft under robs mock.

        • Coug1990 says:

          It is the weight. Both Alvin Bailey and Michael Bowie came into fall camp severely overweight and out-of-shape. Bowie being out-of-shape contributed to his season ending injury.

          If you notice, Pete talks about Bailey needing to lose weight. The talent is there. However, does Bailey want it enough to get into shape? The Seahawks like players that love to play football and compete. So far, Bailey has not put himself into the position to compete for a full-time starting (back-up yes, starting no) job.

  26. DJ says:

    Hi Rob, What do you suppose Sam Bradford’s trade value is if the Rams wanted to move up?

    • rowdy says:

      Very low. Injuries, contract and uneven play make him not a factor to move up in the first I believe. But you didn’t ask me haha

    • David says:

      I know you’re asking Rob but i have been kind of curious of this too. i cant imagine its much considering his injury proneness and when he has played he hasn’t been as great of a QB. but i could be wrong. usually am haha.

      • DJ says:

        Yes, expensive, mediocre, two ACL tears. But still, Alex Smith was traded for a 2nd and given a $45 million deal. He had the mediocrity if not the injuries.

        Let me ask this: what’s the price for Mariota that TB could extract?

    • Rob Staton says:

      Minimal given his injury history.

  27. UK Hawk David says:

    Hi all, still new to the whole draft concept but this site seems full of reasonable Seahawk fans with good insight so it feels like a safe place to post!

    To me it feels like there’s very little difference between the players projected to be pick 16ish and 50ish for the positions we would be most interested in (OL, WR, DL, TE, RB). If this is the case, what do you think about the seahawks trading the late 1st pick for a mid-2nd and mid-4th, then trading our late 4th (knowing comp picks are coming) and late 2nd for another mid-2nd? With the Harvin deal likely to earn a high 6th, I wonder if we could then package late round picks for a low 2nd/high 3rd.

    This might be completely unrealistic but I wonder if we could then get a WR (Coates/Smith/DGB), OL (Sambrailo/Cann/Fisher), and TE Williams or RB Coleman/Ajayi.

    • rowdy says:

      That’s what I feel will happen and exactly what they did last year without the trading up part. I would like to see them trade for picks next year as well. With all the comp pics will get this year I think it would be smart to stock up for next year.

    • Drew says:

      Harvin will probably net us a 4th. He has too much talent and a roster that doesn’t have much of it. The new GM will need him next year as they won’t be able to load up on enough talent through the draft and free agency to be competitive next year if they let him go.

    • James P says:

      Welcome! Where in the UK?

      • UK Hawk David says:

        I’m from Watford just outside of London but I live in California now, flying the flag for the Seahawks in Orange County!

        • James P says:

          Too bad, I’m trying to find other UK Hawk fans in the North West (of the UK).

          Re: your post, I think there is a really good chance of a trade up this year. Totally against JS’s DNA, but the compensatory pick position makes this such a good option. I’m not sure they’d consider trading up in the 1st (perhaps a couple of spots, nothing more) – but a move like you’re suggesting, trading down then up and maximising 2nd/3rd round picks could be a real possibility.

          You’re right about the site, really good place for sensible discussion!

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      Interesting scenario.

      There’s more than enough depth in this draft to take 2 impact players in the middle of R2.

  28. kigenzun says:

    Michael Bennett, Defensive Tackle, Ohio State.

    To bolster the interior pass rush.

    The key to our defense lately has been the pass rush going to town on 3rd downs. Personally, I have no confidence in Cassius Marsh’s ability to stay healthy, and I don’t want to see a major drop off in production again if Brandon Mebane &/or Jordan Hill gets hurt again.

    (Plus, we have seen what we can do with one Michael Bennett on the field… imagine what we could do with 2!)

  29. Volume 12 says:

    Couple thoughts here. Well, actually more than a couple.

    1. No way in hell would I touch DGB with a 10 foot pole. He’s a complete dumpster fire. There’s no way I believe at only age 20, that he has matured that much. Just don’t see it.

    2. I fully expect Seattle to trade back right around the same spot as they did last year. If that’s the case I would take Mizzou DE-LEO Markus Golden, Oregon DL Arik Armistead, or Arizona St DL Marcus Hardison. Golden has everything Seattle looks for in a LEO prospect, Armistead has freakish size, athleticism, and a connection to PC, and Hardison is a truly unique DL. He’s going to rise. Got some Darnell Docket to his game. As Rob says, keep an eye on this guy.

    3. The only OL who is unique for me personally in the 1st is Florida St OL Cameron Erving. Man, what a prospect! He could back up Okung, Unger, Sweezy, and Britt, and then pencil him in at LG or wherever. But, I still don’t see Seattle taking an OL that early. By the way Rob, love me some Ohio St OL Taylor Decker. Fantastic!

    4. I’d expect Seattle to target a couple mid round WRs. Georgia Tech WR Darren Waller-6,5, 235 lb., 4.5 40. Yeah, he’s got great size, but he’s a project and somewhat raw. Not a great route runner, somewhat of a ‘plodder,’ but man what an athlete. Unselfish, competitive, has attitude, and makes the most of his targets. Definition of a red zone weapon and a ‘go up and get it’ up guy. Even if his stock does rise, I’d still take him.

    5. As a sleeper, check out Central Arkansas WR Dezmin Lewis-6’4, 210 lb. Great build, extremely long arms, a hands catcher. I suspect Seattle knows about him, as well as the senior bowl since he’s playing in it, but Seattle took UDFA TE Chase Dixon out of the same school. They’ll get their KR/PR probably later in the draft, if they take a big WR at all that is.

    • Volume 12 says:

      Oh, forgot to mention Houston WR Deonaty Greenberry-6’3,208 lbs., 4.4 40. Again a bit raw, need’s some work, but this kid has swag and confidence in abundance. Someone on the blog pointed him out a few days ago and said he looked like WR Sidney Rice. That’s a great comp, because he really does have a Sidney Rice vibe about him. More of a 3rd or 4th round guy. Could end up as a steal like WR Martavis Bryant.

      • peter says:

        There’s actually a really interesting group of WR’s in the above size frame…All you mentioned above plus Mayle out of WSU, Davis out of UnLV, and Cam Worthy out of ECU….

        Though to peoples chagrin I wouldn’t be surprised if from a pure upgrade and positional value pick Seattle didn’t consider one of either Justin Hardy out of Ecu current fbs receptions leader and a walk on. I’ve go a lot of love for what coach Ruff has done done at ECU with his Seahawky next man up meets walk on heaven and I think you could put Hardy on the field day one and he’d be better at routes, production, and scramble drills then Kearse. Plus he’s an actual PR so there’s that. the other prospect I love is Antwan Goodley out of Baylor with a tick thicker frame then Tate but national track meet speed and solid production that climbed every year to go with KR duties and both of the above were on watch lists for biletnikoff at the beginning of the season.

    • KyleT says:

      This is my favorite comment on the blog today. Though I don’t think they spring for a guy like Armstead early. If they go DL that early it has to be a guy that can rush the QB. I also think they spring for a Leo/SAM 2 position player over a guy like Golden. There should be many such players available when we pick. I like the idea of Hardison if he’s available

  30. Dumbquestions says:

    Oh, just shoot me – given this mock, I say trade up to jump ahead of Denver, take Shaq Thompson and turn him into Marshawn’s successor. If it doesn’t work, you’ve still got a freak athlete. At least one scout told the Seattle Times he’s a viable option at RB:

    http://blogs.seattletimes.com/huskyfootball/2015/01/05/nfl-scouts-weigh-in-on-questions-surrounding-shaq-thompsons-pro-potential/

    In three games at RB, he averaged 7.5 YPC. He’s got soft hands. He’s 6-2, 230 – know who else had those measurements? Jim Brown.

    • TwistedChopper says:

      There’s been plenty of players in this league that are 6-2 and 230. However, only one of them is Jim Brown (literally and figuratively).

  31. Jeff M. says:

    For the purposes of this mock, do you have Ronnie Stanley (OT from ND) declaring? He might be a year away from contributing, which isn’t generally what you’re looking for in a 1st rounder, but you have to think with his youth/size/upside that Cable would have a good chance at molding him into a hell of a player. And while I generally agree with Rob that OT isn’t a big need in 2015 it probably is one in 2016–Okung may leave at the end of his contract, Britt may not figure it out/put it all together in his second year, or both. We could start Okung and Britt with Stanley backing up both next year and then have him ready to step in for either the year after (Sambrailo would be a similar sort of pick in terms of body type/ability/development, but Stanley is a full two years younger).

  32. Drew says:

    I don’t see us re-signing Carpenter, if they do it’ll be because there wasn’t much interest on the market for him. If we don’t, I say move Britt to LG and draft a OT to play RT, but can swing if needed.

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      I used to think so as well. But Carp performed well enough in December that if he’s willing to play for the same salary, they’ll resign him.

      I say this because I just don’t think he’ll get a better offer elsewhere.

      Regarding Britt, first a disclaimer. I like him. He’s one of the best run blocking RTs in the League, and probably the most athletic. Accept it.

      His pass pro is pretty awful, but it’s not the worst. Did anyone notice Bobby Massie getting abused by Charles Johnson? Ryan Lindley sure did. What about Eric Winston repeatedly getting blown up by Cory Redding? And he’s supposed to be a pass pro oriented RT.

      I think Britt gets another season at RT to claim the position.

      • TwistedChopper says:

        Good points, although maybe a bit exaggerated in Britts favor…

      • Ho Lee Chit says:

        RT’s always get blown up by speed rushers. That is why the TE is usually on that side to help out. If it wasn’t an occasional problem Britt would be a LT. I think PC/JS are more than satisfied with the performance of the rookie RT this past season. For the most part he handled it well even without Zack Miller. Breno got beat a few times, also. Next year Britt will be better.

        Unlike many on this board, I feel our OL performed fairly well. The sacks are caused by RW holding the ball too long. No offensive line can restrain the D Line for more than 3 seconds. Peyton gets the ball out in 2.4 seconds. RW averages 3.2 seconds and occasionally runs around for 7 seconds before throwing the ball. My main concern is with the injuries and price paid for Okung. When he is injured Bailey fills in well. Bailey makes $500K. Okung makes $11M. This draft has many LT prospects. Furthermore, there is a drop off when Unger is out. JeanPierre appears to be replaced by Patrick Lewis. Still I see them both being walked back into the QB. There is a need for better quality in our backup OL talent.

  33. AlaskaHawk says:

    Who would be PCs first pick. Well he just signed a defensive tackle as the 53 man on the roster, so I would guess that next draft the first pick will be defensive line. Maybe he will move up this year and get an impact player!

    • Volume 12 says:

      Totally agree Alaska.

      Now it isn’t going to just be a big bodied, run stuffing DT. Waste of resources and draft capital. But, IMO Seattle is still looking for that big/unique DL. They wanted Easley, had ALOT of interest in DL Datone Jones 2 years ago, tried to sign Henry Melton. I know they have DT Jordan Hill, o.k., but what happens if he goes down? If you take a look around the league, ALOT of teams are deploying these type of DL.

      They keep signing DL, trying to find ‘that’ guy. Someone said it was to keep Kevin Williams fresh. That may be the case, but what looking ahead and in the next couple of years when K-Will and Tony McD aren’t here?

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      Signing a DT now is primarily a response to injuries. Specifically, it’s a hedge bet against Jordan Hill’s knee. Generally, it’s because Mebane, Smith, Scruggs and Marsh are all on IR (not to mention Dobbs’ injury).

      No doubt DL is high on the list of priorities, but I don’t think signing Landon Cohen means SEA will go DT with their first pick.

      • CHawk Talker Eric says:

        And it’s a good thing they signed Cohen since I just read Hill is OUT against CAR.

        • Volume 12 says:

          There ya go, Right it’s a response to injuries. They know they need 1 more interior rusher for that reason right there. I’m not sure DT will be their first pick either. But taking a DL who can play all up and down the line and the 5-tech is highly intriguing. It won’t be a Danny Shelton type DL either, I’m talking pure uniqueness.

          How do Dobbs, Scruggs, or D. Smith upgrade anything? That’s my thinking behind the reason. That’s one spot they can definitely upgrade when they set up their draft board.

  34. OZ says:

    My favorite player for the Hawks is Irving. I also like Edwards DT/DE Florida St. Oregon ran at him once then away from him for the rest of the game. A great fit for the Hawks. There are plenty of tall receivers to be had after the 1st round. I also like Lippitt from MSU. Built like Sherman and plays some corner. Greenberry is a sleeper. I also like Montgomery as a second day pick.

  35. Alaska Norm says:

    Along the lines of a big reciever. Pen State TE Jesse James declared yesterday. 6’7″ 260 ish. Would fit the big target description for sure. Might be a mid to late round option if Seattle goes D line, running back, O line the first few rounds.

    • Volume 12 says:

      Penn St TE Jesse James is a FREAK! 6’7, 255 lb., mid 4.5 40, put up over 30 reps on the bench press, had over a 35 in. vert., can lift 400 lb., squats like 500 or something. Potential, Potential, Potential. He didn’t have a great year re diving wise, but Penn St QB Christian Hackenberg really struggled this year. He’s a great run blocker, good character, highly competitive, and a freak athlete. Really like this kid as well.

      • Alaska Norm says:

        Rob, any thoughts on where he might go? I’ve read 3-4 rd. If he tests well at the combine I would look hard at the 2nd for Seattle, he may not be around at the end of the third.

  36. Phil says:

    Wow – great reading. I don’t think there has ever been less consensus on this blog regarding what the Seahawks should do with their first pick. I guess this shows how good our current roster is.

    To restate the obvious, what happens with Marshawn has got to be the key to what the front office decides to do in the draft. A couple of weeks ago, I placed some weight on the idea that PC/JS had had enough of Lynch and that they had decided he wasn’t going to be on the roster next year. Now, I think that PC has changed his thinking and would like to get another year out of Lynch — but not at the cost of a new/renegotiated contract. But, at the same time, I’m beginning to think that Lynch is having second thoughts about his future. I think he will base his decision regarding his future with the Seahawks on whether or not he can get some additional $$ to make it worth another year of sacrificing his already beaten-up body for the team.

    So, is there some point where the two sides sit down to a heart-to-heart discussion, and –if they do — what might be the result?

    I’ve suspected that Lynch would like to close out his career in Oakland. I think he’d like to return to his roots in the Bay Area. If so, what are the chances that the Seahawks could trade him to Oakland? First, I think the Seahawks would probably have to sign him to a new contract, adding at least another another year to the one he has left on his current contract. Then, the Seahawks could package him and some of their 2015 draft picks to Oakland, and get ??? in return?

    If Marshawn leaves under any circumstances, I’m not yet convinced that CMike and Turbin can’t carry the load. But, PC loves competition, so I think if Marshawn is out, another RB will be drafted to add to the competition. Gordon would be my choice — but I don’t think there is any way he will last to us at #32 without us mortgaging the farm.

    Anyway you look at it, the Seahawks have to face the reality of an aging RB whose playing days as a Seahawk are sadly coming to an end — either after this season or the next. The decisions the FO makes in response to this reality are likely to shape the future of the team for the foreseeable future.

    • Stewart says:

      I can see Lynch going one of three ways here. One, he pulls a Jim Brown and retires. Two, he agrees to a short-term extension with Seattle, which wants him back (as the heart and soul of the team), and Marshawn accepts a short-term deal because the environment he plays in (a winning franchise that lets him be himself) is more important than the dollars. Three, we cut ties because he gets a longer-term deal from someone else and Seattle won’t go there. In this last case, the dollars are more important than the environment.

      Lynch is 28. And it’s a hard 28, seeking out contact. He’s like the anti-Franco Harris. How much longer can he play like this before the little niggling injuries become major injuries? PC and JS don’t strike me as guys who will give out cap-killing contracts as a lifetime achievement award. What I have zero insight into is what is most important to Lynch. If I had to guess, I’d say he retires, walks away – hopefully – a two-time SB champion.

      I would like it if Gurley fell to us. If he drops into the 20s, maybe we can swing a trade up for him. Whether or not Lynch stays. If we sign Gurley to a standard 4-yr deal with an option on a 5th, then we’ll be halfway through that contract by the time Lynch hits 30. We’re already on the precipice of peak RB performance, in terms of age. Assuming Gordon is already gone, and assuming another team in the 20s would be willing to take Gurley, there’s no one else out there with his ability at RB in the draft. We have 11 picks in the draft, including what could be a high 3rd rd pick for Harvin.

      CMike has had little to no impact in two years. Turbo is a nice guy to spell Lynch, but I don’t think that he’s a 20-carries-a-game sort of player. I’m not optimistic on this duo being able to maintain the identity of the offense.

      • Drew says:

        The pick for Harvin will either be a 4th or 6th.

      • CHawk Talker Eric says:

        CMike has an impressive 5.1 ypc. Turbin toughened up his running in December. Nobody would mistake either for Lynch, but CMike has only 34 carries all season. It’s too soon to declare him a bust.

        Regardless, either Lynch already played his last season in Seattle, or 2015 will be his last. Replacing him must be at the forefront of JSPC’s strategic planning.

        Phil brings up a potential x-factor with Lynch’s purported desire to close out his career as a Raider. If there’s truth to that, then it raises a host of trade possibilities.

        IMO there are only 2 RBs in this draft that merit a R1 pick. Gordon is simply a fantastic athlete with dedication to match, but he would cost too much to get. Besides, as good as he is, I think Gurley will be better. I said it before and I’ll say it again, Gurley is Herschel Walker 2.0.

        I’m in favor of reaching for him.

        • CD says:

          Put me in the camp that doesn’t believe Lynch will retire after this year and will try to stay in the NFL as long as he can. The guy likes money, drives a Lamborghinie, moneylynch is his tag line. He’s not going to be a RB coach, not going to be a TV guy, he has to earn his money now.

          Saying he might retire is the only leverage he has. How else can he get more money then to bluff that he might retire? Hell, didn’t even J Allen use that last year, then signed for 4 years?

        • AlaskaHawk says:

          I think Lynch stays another year. I don’t think CMike or Turbin have shown anything exceptional. This will sound pretty cold but I would draft a mid to late round running back each year. Eventually we will find one that shines. I don’t see a need to go first round for anyone unless Elliot with Ohio State declares.

    • Ho Lee Chit says:

      Lynch has played 120 games during his career. There are about 40 RB’s that have played more. Emmitt Smith leads the list with 226 starts in the NFL. By that measure Lynch has a lot of tread left on the tires. He is arguably coming off his second best season. He has not missed a start in the last three years. Granted the average RB only lasts 3 years but that is no reason to assume Lynch is done. As long as he stays injury free, there is little reason to believe he should be replaced. I think the fan base is writing him off just because he is approaching the 30 year old mark. Gurley on the other hand, has a serious injury that kept him from playing this last season and may impact his performance next year. For all of the draft hype, let’s remember Gurlley has done nothing in the NFL. Gurley may never approach Lynch’s accomplishments in the NFL and may retire before Lynch does.

  37. Stewart says:

    I’d like to see the 1st rounder go to more pass rush. What about DE Nate Orchard from Utah?

  38. fountaindale says:

    The Hawks do have a lot invested in the O-line which exactly why they should draft an left tackle to replace Okung. When an NFL QB has time to throw even Rob could be an impact WR. You build depth and quality by moving before you have a gun to your head. Even though Okung is an elite tackle his penalties and fragility don’t match his cap hit. Ideally I’d trade up to snag Andrus Peat in the first with Maxx Williams as a coveted second round selection. Britt moves to guard, the first round tackle slides in at RT, and Carpenter goes bye-bye unless he wants to sign for cheap. With Okung gone in 2016 we have a young, talented, relatively inexpensive O-line.
    Other possibilities for LT are Spencer Drango, Baylor, and Sean Hickey, Syracuse, and as Rob said Corey Robinson, South Carolina.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Okung’s cap hit in 2015 is a modest $7m.

      • fountaindale says:

        The 10th pick’s the first year cap hit is only about 2.5 million dollars and the total value of the contract wouldn’t exceed 15 million. You’d save a minimum of 4.5 million in cap space in year one. What happens in 2016 when you have to pony up huge dollars to keep Okung or find a replacement on the free agent market (and you’re hopefully still drafting at 32)? We have some flexibility now because of compensatory picks… make the move now.

        • Rob Staton says:

          I’d caution be careful what you wish for. There’s a reason the good O-liners go in the top ten. They aren’t easy to find — or replace. I would happily re-sign Okung on $8-9m and not worry about the blindside. He has missed games, but not as many as people think. He’s a key figure in the locker room. Worth keeping around IMO.

  39. peter says:

    If the Seahawks draft any olinemen early to me it would be a center. clean pickets and blindsided aside having to filter through line adjustments every few games plus lack of continuity on the inside is what I think kills Wilson. The lt/rt needs to be strong in run blocking and due in part to scheme almost never line up against “their” man….instead they need to react to all of the scrambling variables…mean while I for one wonder what the long term health of Unger will be after multiple seasons with injuries.

    For the sake of Rob’s thought experiment if all of these players are off the board as above then I’d actually consider Max Williams in the second and a Center ( Which I’ll start to look into) in the second using a convoluted trade down and a package of late picks to move back into the second. boring but for the growth of the team…getting consistent in the form of a young all around TE and a center that could grow with Wilson ala Jeff Saturday et al…would be the way I’d go.

    • Drew says:

      From what I’ve seen this year from all of our centers, I don’t think there’s any need to draft a center in the 1st round. Remember, your first round pick should be a pro-bowler and day 1 starter. When healthy Unger is that pro-bowler (yes I know, WHEN he is healthy). But look at what the line has done the last 4-6 weeks or however long Unger has been out. Lem Jean-Pierre is a great back up and I could see him as a starter and Patrick Lewis has been a surprise coming off the practice squad. I don’t think there’s any need to spend a pick that high on a center. If you’re going to spend a 1st round pick on the OL, it needs to a a tackle.

  40. JO says:

    Rob,

    Have been an consistent reader but never posted. Looking at your mock, a rb has not been selected in the first round the last two years and you have three going in round one? Impossible to know but that would be a complete 180 of previous years drafts and where the league has been going.

    I know the nfl is a copy cat league so teams see SEATTLE and how a physical running game with a strong defense can win games but still. If 3 rb’s go in round one it is clearly a down year for the draft at many other positions.

    I think it is a bad year at the qb and wr positions. But every year a qb that no one thought would or should go high always does. Teams always reach at the position. Jameis Winston is going to go top 5. I don’t think he should. I wouldn’t want him. But some team is going to justify it. Watch.

    • Rob Staton says:

      It’s about the talent available really. In 2012 we saw three running backs go in the first round and that was considered a pretty solid draft class in round one. This year Gordon and Gurley should be first round locks — I can see another slipping into the equation.

  41. hawkfaninMT says:

    It seems to me that this could be generational type draft at RB, similar to the 2008 draft…. i sure would hate to miss out on something like that just because it may not have been a “need”

  42. Jim B. says:

    What about a center.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Not for me, as much as I like Erving. Carroll was only discussing the advantage with Unger today — his experience and knowledge in the system is key. I doubt they give that up.

  43. Ed says:

    DGB declared for draft.

    If the draft fell this way (and no Stanley), I would say:

    1st Funchess/Williams/DGB
    2nd Sambraillo/Fisher
    3rd Grasu/Gallick

    As Rob points out, we have high picks on the oline. However, it has been and continues to be our weak link (injuries and poor performance). Especially if Lynch retires, it would be easier to improve our line then find another Lynch (impossible). Let Michael and Turbin not get hit at the line of scrimmage, and ypc could still be similar to Lynch.

    Get a weapon for Russ, then protect Russ. Our D will continue to be our biggest asset and it is set for a few more years (Avril/Bennett/Hill/Sherman/Thomas/Chancellor/Wright) and Wagner and Irvin should get done this year (as well as Wilson).

    • Cysco says:

      heh, sorry Ed, didn’t see your mention of the DGB news.

      Regarding your comment that the o-line is our “weak link”. I’d have to disagree with you there. The seahawks led the league in rushing by a massive margin. How can the league’s best rushing o-line be considered the weak link?

      If you’re referring to poor pass protection, OK i’ll give you that they’re probably below average in pass protection. But if you want to to improve that, you need to keep the line together and not introduce more rookies onto it. Experience and cohesion is the best way Seattle can improve the pass protection. That, and find a big bodied possession receiver.

      You’re not going to improve this line by adding a rookie taken at #32.

      • Ed says:

        Would you not agree rushing is #1 because of Wilson (900 yards rushing) and our philosophy (most attempts in the league). On top of that, look at Lynch yac. How many times does he get four yards after getting hit at the line. Looking at our entire team, our oline has been the weak link since 2006 (receiving core a close 2nd). Don’t let the stats deceive you.

        1st Get a weapon
        2nd Improve oline (I don’t think Okung and Unger last past 2015)
        3rd Improve oline or dline

        • Cysco says:

          I would say that the o-line is built for the scheme the seahawks use. That scheme is all about being the best scrambling team in the league. That includes blocking for the RB and QB. Our o-line is the best at what they are supposed to do.

          This o-line would not be put together if our QB wasn’t mobile. They were put together because of their ability to run block. They do that incredibly well. Regardless of who is carrying the ball. Turbin, Lynch, Michael. They all have similar stats behind this line.

          I’m not saying they can’t improve at pass blocking, but I don’t think the answer is to start replacing members of the best rushing o-line in the league. You don’t run for 400yds more than any other team by accident. You shouldn’t discount what this o-line is really good at.

          • Volume 12 says:

            So if Seattle were to get rid of Okung and Unger then what? You roll the dice on the 2 most important positions on the OL? Just because your drafting or replacing those 2 OL, you’d better hope to shit that they pan out. If they don’t, then the OL is even weaker. In this scenario, your kind of creating un-necessary holes that then have to be filled.

            Yeah, there rushing numbers are like that because of RW ability to scramble and pick up yards with his leg. I don’t see that as problem though. Makes him more difficult to game plan for and gives Seattle’s offense another wrinkle. When RW starts to age and lose some of that mobility and athleticism, then it becomes worrisome, but until then you utilize your best players strengths and what makes them unique.

          • Ed C. says:

            When your QB for 900 yds you do. That’s probably 700 yds more than the average QB.

            Agree to disagree. What do you think the weak link on this team is then?

            • Cysco says:

              weak link on the seahawks? that’s easy.

              The receiving core, and more specifically the lack of any/a big-bodied receiver(s)

              If you look at the way the offense runs, it’s all about running the ball and getting the QB out in space to make plays. I think the biggest issue with the offense s that there isn’t a big receiver who can mirror Wilson and be that big target when he gets outside the pocket.

              This, IMO is also why the team has struggled in the redzone at times this year. When the field is shortened that much, Seattle’s smaller receivers get covered up easily. There’s no guy who can block out a defender and go up and high-point the ball. That close to the end zone, speed is neutralized and size and physicality win out. We don’t have a receiver who can win in that situation.

              There’s a reason why the team has been searching for that big receiver for the last few years.

            • Volume 12 says:

              I don’t know if it’s a ‘weak link,’ but either a unique/3-4 type interior DL and another pass rusher at the LEO. Strengthen a strength so to speak. Keep making this D as dominant and potentially historical as you can.

              Depth on the OL would probably come in 2nd. I’m not saying they don’t need backups for Okung and Unger, because they do. Not in the first three round’s though. Although, Patrick Lewis and LJP are pretty serviceable. Maybe Seattle should take a page out of New Orleans’s book and get RW a dominate LG. Carp has the potential and may get better over time.

              This OL is set up the way it is for a reason. They’re never going to be a dominate pass protecting unit, because RW isn’t a pocket passer. They have to play to RW strength’s. That means moving the pocket, not necessarily knowing where he is at all times as an OL. He’s notoriously difficult to pass block for.

              You can win a SB or be a regularly dominant team without having a great OL. Multiple teams have shown that. Not every position group can be a strength. You have to sacrifice somewhere and I think with a mobile QB you don’t have to have the best OL in the league.

              • Ed says:

                Agreed. And Cysco, I agree also. I had their 1st pick as Funchess/DGB/Williams.

                Our back 7 is set. We drafted 2 receivers in the first 4 rounds last year. Avril/Bennett just go resigned. Our biggest needs would be a TE/hybrid and OL. Maybe another rotational DL since Williams may be gone and Mebane out, but we need talent on OL. Unger/Okung always hurt and Carpenter probably won’t get resigned. In two years, center to left tackle could be gone. Can’t wait until they are gone then try and replace, especially when those 2 miss at least 4 games per year each.

                Could see

                1st TE/hybrid
                2nd DL
                3rd OL
                3rd OL

          • AlaskaHawk says:

            When Seattle can consistently run the ball for TDs in the red zone then I will agree that the OL is good. But every season they are plagued with injuries and have lost games because they couldn’t even gain a yard when they needed to. So I just don’t agree that the line is anything more then average. Production is from Lynch and Wilson. Let’s hope for a repeat where the line led by Unger peaks in the Super Bowl.

  44. Cysco says:

    It’s official, Dorial Green-Beckham is entering the draft.

    So where would you slot him in your mock Rob?

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/01/06/dorial-green-beckham-big-time-talent-with-risks-enters-the-draft/

    • Belgaron says:

      Rob Rang has him going to 49ers at pick 15. Dane Brugler has him going 31 to the NFL franchise in Washington state.

  45. Cysco says:

    Good God I’d hate to see him go to the 49ers.

    I know we can talk personality, off field issues and risk forever, but damn,, looking at just the player, he’s the kind of receiver this offense really needs. He’s a beast with the ball in his hands.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92iWBH62N6o

    If his head stays on straight, he can be a star imo. Seattle would probably be a good organization for him.

    • Volume 12 says:

      God I hop Seattle doesn’t take this kid! It would be Percy Harvin all over again. If he had kept his nose clean and not pushed his girlfriend down a flight of stairs, maybe, but this guy is going to demand the ball and if he goes in the first he’ll never change. He’ll have this concept that he can get away with doing stupid shit for the rest of his life. No way this kid h’s matured enough in only a year and especially at age 20 or 21. Look at T.O., dude has just NOW started to mature, Dez is a knucklehead and needed a god damn baby sitter.

      Just because a WR is big doesn’t automatically mean he’s a good fit.

      I get that people deserve 2nd chances, honestly in my opinion, sometimes people deserve 3rd chances. But Harvin created a mutiny in the locker room and almost derailed a potential dynasty here in Seattle.

      ‘Just because it’s shiny, doesn’t mean it’s a diamond.’

      • Cysco says:

        I don’t think any of us know anything about how he is as a teammate so I think it’s probably a bit unfair to say he’s going to be Percy Harvin all over again. Actually, from what I’ve read about his time at OU, he’s matured a lot and has been a great teammate.

        Now, if you want to focus on the domestic violence aspect of it, then we can discuss whether the seahawks should be willing to take on a kid who has that baggage. But if you think that the Seahawks shouldn’t employ someone who has reports of violence against women,, then we should be lobbying for the the the team to fire Tom Cable.

        The talent is undeniable. Without risk of off field crap, he’d probably be a top-15 pick. I can’t see a rookie coming in and destroying the locker room. This isn’t some veteran receiver making 10m a year.

        • Volume 12 says:

          Fair point as to how he is as a teammate. Maybe I was a bit harsh. Of course his coaches are going to say that about him though. HC Bob Stoops doesn’t strike me as a Jim Harbaugh type.

          Wasn’t Tom Cable’s incident isolated? DGB has a track record. That’s what worries me.

          Again your right, in that he isn’t a vet making 10m a year. As a rookie, it’s almost a ‘buyer beware’ type thing. Is he going to check out when he does get that ‘big’ money? I know it’s a what ‘if’ scenario, but he just strikes me a as Josh Gordon kind of WR. I’m just not sure if this kid could hang or constantly go at the LOB every day in practice.

          • Cysco says:

            yah, really my only point is that at face value, the seahawks are probably going to be interested. That said, if they dig in and talk to coaches, teammates, friends etc and there’s fire? I trust they’ll take him off their board.

            For whatever reason, WR seems to be a position that draws out the “knuckleheads.” Sometimes those guys are worth it. (Dez Bryant) Sometimes they are not (Harvin/Gordon) the difference seems to be that some are good teammates and love playing football. They’re just immature and struggle with life off the field. Others are just punks and are selfish on and off the field.

            I don’t know which kind of guy DGB is, but I’d be lying if I said I don’t get excited about what DGB the football player could do for this team.

    • CD says:

      Could SC actually pick him after the comment York made about the 9’ers needing more off the field accountability?

      Adding a guy with DGB background sure could test that statement for the new coach. If they are serious, they will probably deal A Smith for next to nothing.

      • Arias says:

        Yeah I can’t see York allowing a pick like that after making such a big deal about personal accountability after firing Harbaugh and wanting to ensure future players meet the 49er standard whatever that is.

  46. Volume 12 says:

    This relates to ‘who should Seattle take with their 1st round or 1st pick in general.’ Hear me out here guys. Sorry for the length of this, but I’m just shedding some light on this prospect.

    Rob pointed this guy out in May, I think. I wasn’t that big a fan of him at first, but after watching him this season, his highlight tape, the bowl game, and checking out his back-story, I am starting to develop a ‘man crush’ on this guy. He’s my pick for Seattle’s first round or first overall pick right now. Know who I’m talking about?….

    Mizzou DE-LEO Markus Golden-6’3, 260 lbs. 2014 season totals (includes bowl game): 78 total tackles, 20 TFL!, 12 QB hurries, 10 QB sacks, 3 FF, 2 PBU, 1 Def. TD. Citrus Bowl MVP, won the Dan Farout most inspirational player award, voted on by his teammates. Love, love this guy. He is the definition of a LEO/SAM backer. But if you draft this guy, you take him to put his hand down in the dirt.

    He transcends the traditional DE role. Hell, he may even transcend the LEO role. IMO it may be fair to say that he’s a mix of Dante fowler, Jr., Cliff Avail, and Elvis Dumervil all rolled into one.

    He’s tenacious, a great hand fighter, understand’s leverage and angles, he’s a speed rusher, but bull rushes very well. Can turn speed into power, big timer athlete (former HB and LB), explosive, has LB type quicks, high motor, great character, and extremely mature. He shows up ‘under the bright lights’/in the big games. Also was one of, if not THE team leader.

    Golden has a HUGE personality, tons of attitude and swag, big time trash talker, and he also plays angry. I’ve used this phrase before, but he really does have that WR Doug Baldwin ‘pissed off for greatness’ vibe about him. He would hands down fit right into this locker room.

    Has a fantastic back-story too. Him and his mom have that special relationship like Marshawn, Sherm, Kam, Okung and their moms have. Is it just coincidental? Or something PC/JS like in potential prospects? Comes from an awful, awful part of St. Louis, which is right now one of the toughest cities in America to be from or grow up in.

    I couldn’t post the link to his highlight tape or the link to his back-story, it’d be pretty cool if somebody could. Anyways, the link to his story is http://www.columbiatribune.com/sports/mu_football/golden-living-the-dream-for-himself-older-brother-at-mu. The site is for those that are interested. He’s my current pick for Seattle’s 1st selection. Did I mention how much I love this bad-ass DE-LEO?

    • Rob Staton says:

      I fell for Golden the day I watched him outplay Ju’Wuan James in 2013. No other D-end (I watched every Tennessee game by the end of it) got close to troubling James. Nobody should’ve been surprised to see Ju’Wuan James go in the first round last year. He was and is awesome. Markus Golden is the only guy who ever gave him fits.

      Golden would be a fantastic pick for the Seahawks. It’d almost be unfair.

      • AlaskaHawk says:

        I would pick him in the first. Fits with our defensive scheme. to be a good defensive end a player has to be like a hungry junk yard dog. Smash them down and they just keep coming all game long.

  47. peter says:

    Golden would be my choice by far….but…. And I am not joking about this in the slightest but Rob has an amazing eye for Dline and even Oline talent but more importantly has a crazy knack for pinpointing gamers at the next level for almost the entire Afc North…shazier, Jones, Upshaw, shears, bitonio…there’s more point is I honestly expect the hear “with the 24th pick the Pittsburg Steelers select Markus Golden…

    Personally if his 3cone is as fast as I think it’ll be id be stoked to see Gokden with our first pick.

    • Volume 12 says:

      Peter, nice to hear you like Golden too. Can you imagine Avril, Irvin, Bennett, Hill, and possibly Golden rotating in Seattle’s ‘NASCAR’ package in 2015?!

      I think Pittsburgh may have more pressing needs on the O-line and at DB. It’s notoriously hard for OLBs to learn Dick LeBeau’s 3-4 scheme. Don’t know if Pittsburgh can afford to go into next season with that DB and O-line group they have, all the while spending a 1st round pick on a guy who may take 2-3 years to learn the scheme. Just my opinion.

      Rob has an amazing eye for talent PERIOD.

      • peter says:

        No doubt they absolutely can not go into next season with their woes..and pick a olb/de!

        But Seattle on the other hand…i am all about making the d young and awesome for as long as possible

        • Volume 12 says:

          Me too, regarding the D in Seattle. There’s no way in IMO that with PC sitting in that draft room that they don’t take a handful of exciting young talent to add to the D.

    • CHawk Talker Eric says:

      This is exactly the justification for UK Hawk David’s scenario of SEA trading down from R1 for a mid R2 + R7 ala last year, then trading back back up into mid R2 such that they have 2 mid R2 picks.

      Golden is worth a high R2 pick, but he could very well be there in the middle of the round.

      Williams most likely will be.

      Can you imagine a draft where SEA walks away with Golden and Williams?

  48. Ross says:

    I don’t remember who it was, could have been PC in a presser, but someone was talking about Bruce Irvin’s new role as a swing linebacker and pass rusher and I really got the vibe that the team is looking into expanding that position in some way. It’s worked out great for Irvin who doesn’t have the same bulk and power to stand up against the run like Clemons, but has alien speed.

    Marcus Golden might fit into that sort of role with his athleticism. I don’t know if he could be regular starter at defensive end. Undersized college players seem to have trouble translating their game without that extra leverage or weight. Rob would know far more about the specifics of Golden’s game than I though.

    Otherwise, Mario Edwards or Preston Smith could be options in the second. If I remember correctly, both can play inside and out, which I think is what the defense really needs. We’re down to journeymen like Dobbs with Hill on the IR. We need someone who can rush the interior and a backup/partner for Avril and Irvin on the edge would be useful.

    • Volume 12 says:

      That’s what I mean. DE-LEO Markus Golden would be Avril’s backup and partner in crime.

      As for undersized pass rushers, your kidding right? Bruce Irvin is undersized, Cliff Avril is undersized, Justin Houston is undersized, Elvis Dumervil is undersized, Jerry Hughes is undersized, Robert Mathis and Dwight Freely are undersized, Von Miller is undersized, Chris Clemons is undersized Dante fowler, Jr. and Shane Ray are undersized. Shall I go on?

      Florida St DL Mario Edwards does have exciting potential, but he’s so underwhelming.

  49. Carl says:

    My favorite Seahawky player in this draft (so far) is Maxx Williams. Loves blocking, good size, makes the most out of his targets. I’d love to see them trade a few spots down, picking up an extra selection, and taking Williams at the top of the second round.

  50. Jae says:

    Tennessee taking a DT? Eagles taking Winston? Danny Shelton “overrated”?

    Wow. We all have our opinions, but yours are not very good. Do you watch football? I am being dead serious here.

    • Rob Staton says:

      Thanks for the telling counter argument. When we disagree in this community, we tend to offer more than “your opinion disagrees with mine, therefore it isn’t very good.”

      Poor.